Big K.R.I.T Wants Collaborative J. Cole Project; Talks Mixtape With Yelawolf


Tray Hova | October 22, 2010 - 7:17 pm

It doesn’t take a certified country boy to respect the talent of Mississippi MC, Big K.R.I.T. Still collecting shine off his mixtape—or album as he’d like to call it—K.R.I.T Was Here, the 24-year-old is focused on what 2011 has in store. And thus far fans can expect some special team-ups.

“A lot of people been asking when that collab with J. Cole going to happen. I’m definitely down for it,” K.R.I.T says about Roc Nation’s starting rhymer. “[But] I really enjoy the organic aspect of being in the same studio as someone. So I just haven’t had the chance to meet up with him, but we’re going to get up by the end of this year or early next definitely.”

Although K.R.I.T explains that he’s always been a fan of the North Carolina rapper, it was Cole’s “Bun B For President” that really made K.R.I.T give up the cool points. “I respect his production aspect and his lyrical content. Hell yeah I’d do [a mixtape] with Cole! It would be crazy if we both co-produced it. That would be something new.”

But before that can happen, K.R.I.T’s on the path to finishing his anticipated mixtape with Yelawolf entitled The Country Cousins: Trunk Muzik Wuz Here. “Man that mixtape is going to be crazy. The people just gotta be a tad patient because we’re both on tour now, but we’re going to finish up real soon.”

K.R.I.T also went on to say that idea to collaborate on a mixtape with Yelawolf happened the same day they met for the first time. “Yela was working on his album near me and I brought some beats on deck to holla at him with. That was the first time I met him. We just vibe and were throwing the whole country cousins saying around. Shit, just felt right.”

Yela revealed to MTV that the two had worked on a song called “Happy Birthday Hip-Hop” that K.R.I.T produced himself. “The drum pattern and beat itself are mad soulful, just old school,” says K.R.I.T. “We’re celebrating the fact that we’re from two places in the south where people don’t expect us to be able to spit. But the industry respects our content and we’re here now. And our time is now.”—Tracy Garraud