See The Rock Cry, Plus 4 More Reasons To See ‘Faster’


RI Reeves | November 26, 2010 - 6:17 am

Reason 3:  Dwayne not only did his research to play a prisoner, he also worked harder than ever to make sure his ex-con physique was just right. And his body is bigger than ever in Faster. 

Dwayne Johnson: “Bigger is always better. I worked my butt off for this movie—three and a half of months of training and I gained 10 to 12 pounds. I was playing someone who was incarcerated for 10 years and 9 1/2 of those years were in solitary confinement. In the prison the type of training that do is very unsophisticated and it’s a raw type of training. I was able to train like that for the role.  We also sat down with individuals who served a lot of time in maximum security prisons for a variety of crimes including murder, getting into their psyche and their thought process and their perspective on what it’s like to take another man’s life.”


Reason 2: Even though Johnson’s character Driver is a Terminator-like killer who literally blows people away one by one, he’s still a sweet guy you can relate to.

Johnson: “I didn’t think of him as hero nor a cold-blooded killer I thought of him as man who was tortured who had a lot of turmoil going on. The notion of you took something from me something that I loved the only thing that I loved— my family [in the movie it’s Driver’s brother.] Personally, I would go to the ends of the earth to protect my family. I think we all would. So that was something that resonated with me, and  I looked at him as a man I felt connected to.”


Reason 1:  Despite the fact Faster is an action film, another man actually made Dwayne cry real tears during the shoot.

Johnson: “It’s my favorite scene in the movie [a showdown scene between he and Lost’s Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje that takes place on the beach] and it’s really special when you can have scenes like that. It was an emotional day for all of us and I was pretty moved by the emotion that was conjured up. Adewale is such a great actor and he’s very commanding presence. When he got down on his knees and started singing I was moved and the tears were real.”—As told to Ronke Idowu Reeves