Return To Sender: 6 Epic Responses To Homeboy Sandman’s ‘Black People Are Cowards’ Op-Ed


| May 1, 2014 - 5:34 pm

Homeboy Sandman had everyone reacting with his Monday morning troll of an editorial “Black People Are Cowards,” which was published on Gawker and quickly circulated in Facebook statuses and around the web (even here). While Sandman’s sentiments seem to be in the right place, there were plenty of faulty points, starting from the inflammatory title right on down to the indictment of all Blacks as a homogenous community of heartless complacents.

More than a few writers clickety-clapped back on their keyboards, questioning Homeboy Sandman’s intentions and logic. Here are some of the best counterpoints, all essentials in your bookmark bar. —John Kennedy

F**k You, Gawker! If Black People Are Cowards, What Are White People?, by Tanya Steele
Cotdamn. Tanya focuses her disgust on Gawker and other White publications that benefit (yes, benefit) from Black anguish by publishing click-bait sensationalism.
Excerpt: “Whoever sits in front of the camera or gets to pen a piece is chosen by the same cowardly muthafuckas who could give two shits about Blackness unless it brings ratings. Or, unless some racesplainin’ needs to happen to help White people understand why people are acting so crazy when it comes to race.”

Excuse Me If I Don’t Drink Homeboy Sandman’s ‘Black People Are Cowards’ Kool-Aid, by David D.
TSS basically ethers Sandman, and hammers home the point that it’s not fully the responsibility of the oppressed to right the oppressor’s wrongs.
Excerpt: “I’m just not impressed or moved by 2,000 words on how sh*tty I am as a Black person, and how I’m not doing enough to change the world – as if the solutions to all of our plight would be solved if we just read a Gawker article by Homeboy Sandman. I watched my dad and his fellow Freedom Fighters – some of the most amazing people I’ve ever met – still struggle with wondering if they made the right decisions with every sacrifice. They’ve wondered what they could have done better, how they could have avoided so much bloodshed or, if given the opportunity, could they go back and do it all again.”

Clippers Controversy and Black Blaming, Again, by Jamilah Lemieux
This Ebony editorial criticizes Sandman’s shaming of the Clippers and all Black people, particularly for a publication owned, run and read by Whites.
Excerpt: “’I want to reach Black people. I must go to Gawker,’ said no one ever.” and “Is there anything more cowardly than attempting to hold up a mirror to Black people about their flaws and using White hands to prop your arm up?…”

Who’s the Coward?: The Flawed Logic of Faux Revolutionaries, by Kimberly Foster
Title says it all. Kimberly accuses Sandman of “peddling Black pathology,” of which she is absolutely correct.
Excerpt: “We could all do more. Everyone thinks they’re a revolutionary until it’s time to put their own life or livelihood on the line. It’s far too easy to critique what someone else should have done when you have nothing at stake. If you believe ‘cooning’ and cowardice to be Black America’s greatest problems, then you have imbibed the toxicity of white supremacy.”

Two Blacks Discuss This Month in Racism, by Julian Kimble and Lauretta Charlton
Two Complex writers go back and forth about the problems with Sandman’s logic.
Excerpt: “The players sitting out a playoff game and getting fined as a result wouldn’t have accomplished much. It was up to the league to deal with Sterling accordingly, and Silver did as much as he could to punish a ridiculously wealthy 80-year-old bigot. Donald Sterling wasn’t their boss—they play for the NBA, not him.”

Homeboy Sandman Is Not My Homeboy
The Black Tongue takes some jabs at VIBE’s promotion of Sandman’s piece before calling the rapper’s solutions “pre-packaged” and ineffective.
Excerpt: “I don’t care about Homeboy Sandman. I care about black people telling other black people that our destinies are in our own hands as if there aren’t other hands tightly gripped around our throats.”