Bow Wow Talks ‘Big Happy Family’ DVD Release, Collab With Good Charlotte + Carter IV

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By: namcgloster / September 1, 2011

Bow Wow is a bonafide actor now with a handful of movies roles under his belt and appearances on hit shows like Entourage and Ugly Betty, Mr. Shad Moss is nothing short of a rapper-turned-actor success. His latest silver screen move, as Byron in Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family, is now available on DVD.

VIBE caught up with the young Hollywood star to talk about the release of yet another acting gig and his time on set. We also checked in on his progress with seventh (yep, count ‘em) studio album Underrated due out November 1.




VIBE: Tell me, how do you feel about the reception of the movie and the reaction from fans? Are you super excited that it’s on DVD now and people can get it in their homes?
BOW WOW: Oh yeah, most definitely. I’m always excited for a DVD release. It’s also like a little collector’s item for the fans; they get a chance to get all the bonus footage. I’m happy that it’s out. Either you go see it or wait for it on DVD. It don’t matter, as long as you support the movie. But I’m definitely excited about the reaction. I knew people were gonna love it, especially the whole “Byron” thing. I thought Tyler was a genius for that. All in all, I felt like it was a great project. I was glad to be a part of it.

Awesome. Now is there any part of the movie or bloopers that we don’t get to see that you can touch on? Maybe like a funny moment or something like that?
Not any bloopers, because the set was serious. We worked with Tyler, and it’s definitely serious. There’s no playing around. I’m gonna go get the DVD myself because I’m not sure what’s exactly on there, but I’m sure there’s some funny stuff. We had some funny moments, but for the most part it was kind of serious on set.

For Madea’s Big Happy Family, who was your favorite person to work with on the set or just a person you learned a whole bunch from?
Of course I learned from Tyler. I ain’t learn from nobody else but Tyler. That’s the person that you really want to learn from. All in all, it was kind of weird man because I was the youngest out of all the guys but I had the most experience as far as being in the most movies. I remember the first day on set, just making sure that that cast mates were comfortable, making sure they were cool, and that their minds were good—telling them it’s no pressure, be cool, and that we’re gonna get through it. I found myself kind of being the leader or like the captain. It was cool, but I’ve always been the type of person to learn from other people without asking. Tyler was somebody that I always made sure that I watched, even while he was directing.

Ok. Well everyone’s really interested in this album Underrated. Tell me, although the album title is self explanatory, what message are you trying to get out on this album? Is there anything specifically that you’re want to say?
For me, it’s all about letting the work define everything for me, even the title. It’s a person who does their thing but really doesn’t get the recognition for it or the props for it. I feel like the best way to get the respect is to put out the best music I possibly can, and I feel like that won’t be hard for me to do. This time around, it’s gonna be even more crazier being that I signed to Cash Money a year and a half ago. The tools and the things I got this time that I didn’t have last time is gonna make this project so exciting. I think that’s why the people are so in tuned to Underrated. It’s gonna be big.

Any artist, specifically, that you were excited to work with this time around or get back in the studio with?
Pretty much everybody because this is the first album I got a chance to work with so many diverse artists. I’m in the studio with Game today, and I was in the studio last month with Good Charlotte. That just goes to show you the lanes that I’m going with. I worked with Boyz II Men during the process of the album, I worked with Snoop, Chris Breezy. I pretty much worked with a lot of people. Just to have those records, even if they don’t go on the album. I pretty much recorded with everybody in the game that you could possibly name right now. I’m sure all those songs won’t make the album, but some of them will.

Good Charlotte? Sounds hot. What’s your direction sonically with this album?
To be honest, this album is more personal than anything. As an artist, you write about your life experiences. Some rappers don’t. They fabricate their lines, and they just talk about what they see and what they read about. For me, my whole entire blueprint has been built off of me just talking about things I actually do and things I actually live. I can’t wait for the people to get the new material. It’s my best material, and this is me. I’m happy to just present this new project.

That’s awesome. Are you going to do the digital drop first or you just gonna go physical with it?
Because I am a digital artist and the pull that I do have on the internet with the whole YouTube thing, almost 2 million followers on Twitter, having too many fans on Facebook–that right there alone already tells me. So I’m sure I’ll definitely do the digital thing first. That’s kind of the whole new thing they’ve been pushing at Cash Money anyway. I feel like we kind of started that whole thing; we did that with Lil Wayne’s release I Am Not A Human. We released that digitally first; it’s kind of been like our new little blueprint.

Dope. How do you feel about Lil Wayne’s Carter IV being projected to sell 700k?
That’s kind of the same number that I predicted too, to be honest. I feel like that’s good for our day and time. I know Tune pushed like a milli the last time, but [Carter IV] is a good project. I know Tune is happy with it. You might as well say he went platinum the first week; 700 is basically certified platinum. It’s pretty much the same thing. Of course it’s the home team, and it’s another plaque we can hang on the wall, so I’m happy for Tune. Everybody can stop the whole anticipation and speculation. Now you can go to the store and pick it up. Next is Drizzy, and after Drizzy, it’s me.