Debra Antney On Gucci Split, Beef Rumors & Inner Turmoil [Pg. 3]


Vibe / November 16, 2010

On The Origins Of 1017 and Brick Squad, Gucci Split:
1017 is 1017—it’s Gucci’s label. Brick Squad is something else. Brick Squad consisted of Gooch, Waka, Whoo, OJ da Juiceman and Frenchie. That was them so they called themselves Brick Squad. People make it out to be something that it’s not. Like So Icey. Like they were So Icey Boys. But then people started turning So Icey Boys to gang-related stuff and everybody started becoming a So Icey Boy. 1017 is the address where Gucci grew up in Alabama. So Icey really wasn’t something that he wanted the other thing to be called. So Icey is what I named it, after the record. But that really wasn’t what he wanted, so he created 1017.
In order for him to have grown up, he had to do things on his own. Every time he do something I’m right to the rescue to clean up, to do whatever. And he’s not gonna learn anything by doing that. We talked and he’s like, “Auntie I wanna create a label and I wanna be able to do this, to see if I can do this, and you just back me on it.” At first I was like “Oh, hell no.” It was so hard to just release and let him go, knowing the kind of person he is. But he’s like, “If I do this would you do that for me?” And he did, he went to rehab and he did what he had to do and I had to keep my word. It wasn’t what the people made it out to be. People took it somewhere that it wasn’t. I think all of us played roles in allowing the people to come in and crush the whole movement, because it had gotten so ugly. But it was to stay to back so he could do whatever he had to do; we had to keep playing the game. You couldn’t come forward and say nothing because then people would really know what the hell was going on. So Icey was me and him, Mizay was me, 1017 is him. So we had something together and things apart. When we did this, I gave him Waka to put on his label. That’s why people are crazy like when they have all of this say. He did what he supposed to do and I gave Waka to him to start his label. You get clean, you get yourself together and you show me that this is what you gonna do then, yeah.

On cussing out VIBE over the supposed Waka and Gucci “beef”:
I do owe VIBE an apology as far as that goes, because I got the interviews confused. The interview that we did at BET, I thought it was the VIBE, ‘cause I remember them going through that question or whatever. If you listen to his record called “Fuck the Industry” and that’s where it came from. I watched the industry tear my family down. Gucci went off to do his thing and he was over there. We all weren’t in the same household no more, everything was different. We all was not speaking. Gooch moved, Waka moved, I moved. As we started growing and as I started building stuff people started coming just coming and being that I was a woman I was being attacked from every angle—from Gucci to Nicki. First it was Nicki then to Gucci then Juice—it was just crazy. And that’s how [Waka’s song] “Snakes in the Grass” came about. It was ripping us, it was destroying our whole camp. The camp was being infiltrated. I was letting people come in, thinking that they were really down, but they weren’t. Like their job was to come in and destroy and tear us up. And I was sleeping on things. I was really sleeping on a lot of people and things.

On The Mizay Philosophy: Loyalty Over Royalty:
This industry is to’ up. It’s really really to’ up the way people are and the things that people do in here. With us, we take loyalty over royalty. Money we could get but we can’t replace people because they’re important to us. We’re all sitting down—Waka, Gooch, me, Juice—we all have a major meeting that we’re about to do. We can’t do this. This is crazy. It’s not worth it. This next album that’s coming out, it’s all of them together: Brick Squad. You will see them together. That’s people’s interpretation: ‘Oh, he ain’t on the song so it’s a problem.’ No it’s not.

Nobody could never ever second-guess [our loyalty]. Them two been fighting like—do you not understand how they used to tear my house up? All of ’em. They like brothers, like literally. The fights that they used to do: they argue, they sit there and—they ridiculous. Gooch wasn’t the nephew—he really replaced my son. He put that fifth person element back into the household again. He became the bigger brother for everybody.  No matter what people try to do, no one could ever take away what we all have together. You could have his music, but our bonds—can’t nobody take that away from us. It doesn’t matter what people say just ‘cause you not on a record with a person. In no way did [Waka] forget how this stuff was created and who gave him his second chance at life because he was on a road of destruction. He was self-destructing every day, the stuff he was doing the things he was getting into. He wasn’t supposed to be here and through that man he showed him another way. People just don’t know that because these are not things that are thrown out there. They supported each other on a lot of stuff. You know how much they was in studios with each other? For people to say something different, it’s not for people to know. That was a good thing when we were all together, people were not in our business and that was one of the things: when he got with another set and he got with another set everybody got in and knew everything that was going on. My rule is that whatever goes on in my household stays in my household. I don’t care who you are. You’re not privileged to come in. You’re not invited, you’re not getting in. That’s why I never did [speak on it publicly]. Until that one time that I did ‘cause I was so angry at people. I was angry at the stuff that people had to say about me. And I came out wrong. Like, “Damned, why did I have to do it that way?” But it is who I am. I’m not gonna sit here and sugarcoat nothing like I’m some innocent whatever ‘cause I’m far from that. But I was angry at the lies. And it’s the only thing about this game that I hate: you open up the door for everybody to come in and invade. It’s home invasion all the time.