MOB TIES: MEET A$AP ANT (ADDIE)

Music

/ November 29, 2012

Rocking out with a mob of your homies has it’s perks. The sheer energy of the collective on stage with you is enough to elevate your confidence and enhance your performance.There is a down side to that, though. For one, it’s hard to distinguish yourself. Your audience may not be able to make the distinction between you and one of your rhyme buddies, lumping you all together. You may have to really work at standing out amongst your counterparts.

(A$AP Ferg will be performing at VIBE’s first V-Mix concert this Thursday in NYC – Purchase Tickets HERE)

Worse yet, the fans of the collective may label you the weakest link. Let’s face it: everybody wants to be Ghost, Mef or Rae… no one wants to be UGod. Therein lies A$AP Ant’s (sometimes known as Addie) dilemma. He’s aware that he’s been labeled on more than one occasion as A$AP’s lyrical lightweight. Rather than labeling his detractors as haters, Addie is working hard to overcome the naysayers and perfecting his off-kilter style. Takes a lot to admit that and work toward improving his style. And he is definitely showing improvement by showing and proving. Read onto see why and more importantly how he plans on to show the world he was built for this rap life.

VIBE: What’s up Addie? Tell the people where you’re from.
Addie: I’m from Baltimore. I linked up with my Harlem niggas through Yams mostly. I met Rocky then eventually I met everyone else.

How did you meet Yams?
I met Yams through some fashion shit. I have a clothing line called Marino. It was available in a few spots. One of the spots was Memes in Soho. I had the brand and family in New York so I was out there a lot. Ended up linking with Yams on one of the trips out.

How is it being the only kid from Baltimore on the squad?
Being from Baltimore I definitely have a different style. It’s hard to explain it specifically because ain’t no real Bmore rappers doing what I’m doing to really compare a style to. Growing up I listened to a lot of Rocafella stuff and Hot Boys for sure so those are my influences.

So you’re kind of newcomer to rap compared to some of your cohorts, no?
I mean, I’ve always been into rap but my brothers were more into being rappers. I was the only nigga on streetwear in Bmore so that was like my zone. But I feel like rap is something hidden inside me that I could do.

Are you still doing the clothing line stuff?
Right now Marino is on hold but I’m getting the merch popping and a mixtape to accompany that popping. I got a crew in Bmore called Marino Gang. I eventually want to put them on but I’m not in position to yet. I’m still trying to get my self on fully. I don’t want to make the mistake of focusing on too much. I’m just trying to focus on rap and merch.

How do you feel about A$AP’s output?
We still trying to figure out the formula and chemistry when we all together. Ferg and Nast just have that chemistry. It’s dope to see. I can do shit independently but together it gets kind of hard.

So how was the tour?
The shit was good. I’ve been seeing my followers picking up after every show and just seeing the shit spreading. And this is only my first real tour. I had “Coke & White Bitches” so I did a few shows off of that but this is my first official tour.

I heard it gets live on the tour bus aka Rikers Island.
Yeah shit gets crazy on there. You can’t leave nothing alone… your phone charger gets taken, weed… Ain’t no food so we all eating turkey bacon sandwiches fighting over mayo. Shit’s wild.

So you’ve been receiving some criticism for your raps. Care to speak on that?
Well first off most of the music on Lords Never Worry was old. “Full Metal Jacket” was the newest song. At first my rapping wasn’t fluent, it wasn’t that good. Now I have something to prove because niggas was calling me the wackest out of A$AP. So I got to put these bangers on the second project to show I’ve gotten better at it.

How did the crowds react on tour?
The reaction at the shows is still live. Niggas make their comments online but at the shows just seeing people knowing my songs and my verse on “Bath Salts” makes me want to keep going, keep getting better.