Nick Cannon (Pg. 2)


kmurphy / June 7, 2010

Well, luckily I’m also a comedian at heart. I was blessed with the biggest sense of humor ever, so it’s extremely hard to hurt my feelings. If you look at one of the shows I created, Wild ‘N Out, people said everything under the sun about me and I just laughed it off. But the one thing that’s a soft spot for me is when people disrespect my wife because that’s just off limits. As a husband, it’s my duty to step up and say something when anybody goes that route. But you can say whatever you want to say about me. You can call me Mr. Carey, a boy toy, an umbrella holder [laughs]; all that stuff is hilarious to me. But strength does come with a lot of it. To be able to be married to one of the most famous and powerful women in entertainment you know that there are some positions that have to be played.

So who wears the pants?

There are certain areas for both of us. I never try to step in her spotlight. When it’s Mariah time I’m rocking, but at the same time I stand my ground. I know what our relationship is at home, which is totally different.

I find your marriage very interesting. It seems like a lot of the mainstream media doesn’t look at you two as a Black married couple, given Mariah’s bi-racial background. Why do you think a lot of people don’t view you in that light?

If you got the chance to kick it with us on a day-to-day basis we are definitely a Black couple. We are the epitome of that. For so long Mariah’s persona had been protected and manipulated where people didn’t even speak on her ethnicity. But true at heart, she’s a sister all the way. She holds me down the same way that any black woman would. She’ll cuss you out in a second [Laughs]. She’s in the kitchen cooking.

Come on, dog. Mariah cooks?

Yeah! She goes in. Everything from breakfast to fried chicken. But you wouldn’t really know that because the machine presents an artist, whether it’s to sell more records or get a bigger audience, in a certain way. They make the situation when it comes to race as generic as possible. But we know who we really are; we represent each other and our cultures extremely well.

How long did it take you to get used to the brighter spotlight of the tabloid world?

It unnerves you to a point. But I’m a very outspoken person and my wife is private. And I respect my wife’s privacy. And at the end of the day, as I said before, I’m a comedian that says anything that comes to my damn mind. And sometimes I have to remember that I’m not just speaking for myself anymore. I have to be a little cognitive of that. But other than that, the [tabloid press] doesn’t bother me that much.

You mentioned the show Wild ‘N Out, which went on to become a huge hit for MTV. Are there plans to bring it back?

Yes. We are actually revamping it and bringing Wild ‘N Out back just because of the strong demand for it. I was kind of ready to leave it behind, but I sat down with the people at MTV, and because the re-runs do so well for the network, people wanted them to bring it back. We are looking to re-launch it at the top of next year.

You’ve gotten jokes and praise for your music career. Are we going to see you pick up a mic and transform into MC Nick again?