‘Stop-And-Frisk’ To Stand Trial In NYC

National

/ March 15, 2013

Stop-and-Frisk is being put on trial in federal court starting Monday, March 18 in the class action lawsuit Floyd v. the City of New York.

The New York Civil Liberties Union reported today that the NYPD will record its 5 millionth stop-and-frisk today, according to an analysis the NYCLU conducted on an “extrapolation of Police Department data.”

4.4 million of the stop-and-frisk encounters, or 88 percent, did not result in an arrest or summons, the NYCLU said. More than 86 percent of those stopped were Black or Latino. In 2002, NYPD officers conducted 97,296 stops. Almost a decade later, in 2011, they conducted 685,724, according to NYCLU reports.

The city contends that the stop-and-frisk policy works, and is responsible for a notable decrease in crime citywide. But with the current fracas going on in Brooklyn, it seems that there is an element of controversy to that statement.

A class action federal lawsuit brought by the Center for Constitutional Rights against the controversial police practice will finally get its day in court next week on March 18. In Floyd v. the City of New York, people who have experienced the stop-and-frisk procedure are suing the city on the grounds that the practice is unconstitutional, and targets Black and Latino New Yorkers disproportionately.

For more information about the riots inspired by Kimani Gray, head over to Slate.com.

Props: Village Voice