Why The College Basketball Tradition Of Court Storming Needs To End

Features

/ February 28, 2014

At the end of last night’s college basketball game between New Mexico State and Utah Valley, there should have been the normal occurrence of the salty losing team heading to the locker room and the joyful winners preparing to celebrate with the supporting student body. Just not simultaneously.

The debate over whether or not to ban court storming has been a bit ongoing for the past few years, but the video above of what transpired last night puts serious steam to put an end to the long lasting tradition. It even convinced me.

I went to a basketball school for college. Albeit a rather small one, we still had our moments of glory during my tenure. As a young reporter, I had to hold in the urge to join my friends out of a sense of respect for my (future) profession. Of course, I said fuck all that once my school won the conference title. And yes, I stormed the court. It was exhilarating, it was fun, and it hindsight, it was stupid as hell.

Not only did we risk getting hurt, but what if we hurt one of the (star) players in our court storming stupor? The party would’ve ended quite quickly then. Or worse, what if some one was fatally hurt, which could very well happen if a sea of people rush towards a concentrated area without thinking.

There’s no doubt college kids do tons of questionable things, and storming a basketball court might seem low on the totem pole of importance when it comes to things we hope they don’t do. That is until someone gets maimed or a fight breaks out, making the task of restoring order nearly impossible.

Cooler heads prevailed last night before the spat between New Mexico St. guard K.C. Ross-Miller and Utah Valley guard Holton Hunsaker could turn into the college version of Ron Artest and the Pacers versus the city of Detroit. But there have been other instances, like when a kid from North Carolina State stormed the the court in a wheelchair and happened to be saved by player who saw him in time, or when current Boston Celtic’s forward Jared Sullinger kept his head after being spit on by a fan while still playing at Ohio State, when things could have turned ugly.

So let’s just put a stop to it now, before that one tragic accident scars the game and makes us college hoops fans more than just mad in March.