What We’ve Learned From Diddy’s “O Let’s Do It (Remix)” Verse

A long time ago, Sean Combs told us not to worry about whether he writes his own rhymes, and thank goodness for the lesson. It makes it so much easier to enjoy boastful lyrics like those he spews on Waka Flocka Flame’s “O Let’s Do It (Remix).” Of course, there are noteworthy verses from Gucci Mane, Rick Ross, and Waka himself, but none are sniffing the hubris Diddy emits in the leadoff stanza. Below are five things we learned while listening to Mr. Combs’s 16. –Jozen Cummings

1)  He’s On A 24-Hour Ciroc Diet: We wouldn’t be surprised if he bathed in it.
 

2)  There’s A Lamborghini Truck In Existence: We haven’t seen it yet, but according to Diddy, nobody else has either.
 

3)  Biggie Remains Close To His Heart: In one of his best lines, the Bad Boy with a lifetime membership continues eulogizing his fallen friend, rhyming, “B*tches come in combos/pictures of Christopher on my wall all in my condo.”
 

4)  So Does J. Lo: Diddy still misses his ex-girlfriend. So says this couplet: “I don’t fuck with fake hoes/all I touch is J. Lo’s.”

5)  This Is (Still) The Remix: In case y’all forgot, he invented this shit. No Trey Songz.

From the Web

More on Vibe

Getty Images

Gucci Mane And Waka Flocka Put The Past Behind Them

After a years-long rift that resulted in subliminal statements and a torn friendship, Gucci Mane and Waka Flocka have arrived at a point of neutrality. The pair has been at odds in previous years due to personal and business matters, and at one point fans were convinced the Atlanta natives would remain outside of each other's orbit.

Now, Gucci said he was inspired to reach out to Waka after he was notified of the latter's public video message in November that called for a mediation between the two. "To be honest, with him going on the Internet like that, I reached out because I thought it was urgent," Gucci shared during an interview with Streetz 94.5 radio station. The "I Get The Bag" rapper continued to state that all has been settled between the two, reiterating that "everything's in the past now."

A month ago, Waka publicized his call to have a discussion with Gucci. Taking to Instagram, the "Hard in Da Paint" artist said, "All that playing over with. You know how to get me big dawg...You call me." Prior offenses included Waka's contention with Gucci's memoir and other business-related decisions, which Waka addressed on his song, "Was My Dawg."

 

View this post on Instagram

 

The Biggest‼️

A post shared by WAKA FLOCKA (@wakaflocka) on Nov 11, 2018 at 6:25pm PST

Watch Gucci Mane's revelation below.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

#GucciMane (@laflare1017) reveals that he and @wakaflocka have settled their differences and “everything is in the past now” 🚨| What do you guys think the conversation between Streetz Morning Takeover and Gucci Mane? Comment Below! 👇🏾 | #streetz945 #streetzmorningtakeover @moquickatl @joclive @shawtythecomedian

A post shared by Streetz 94.5 Atlanta (@streetz945atl) on Dec 13, 2018 at 5:19am PST

READ MORE: Waka Flocka Might Settle Rift With Gucci Mane

Continue Reading
Trick Daddy inserted his thoughts on the Ebro/ Kodak Black interview controversy.
Getty Images

Trick Daddy Calls Ebro A "Fake A** Charlamagne" After Kodak Black Interview

Many are throwing their comments and thoughts into the recent news regarding Ebro Darden and Kodak Black. The radio host attempted to facilitate a conversation surrounding the rapper's sexual assault allegations. The "Codeine Dreaming" MC left the interview shortly after being made uncomfortable.

While many are standing by Darden's stab at tackling the elephant in the room, many others are calling out the Hot 97 host for bringing up such a sensitive topic. One of the people upset with Ebro is rapper Trick Daddy.

"Ebro, you disrespected the homie. You tried a young n***a. Kodak my little n***a, n***a," he said in an Instagram video defending Kodak. "If nobody gon' step up, I'm gon' step up, n***a. I want smoke, n***a. You get on the radio, you're supposed to be an older n***a. You're supposed to be a n***a that's supposed to lead these n***as not into temptation. You're supposed to get these n***as and put them under your wing and teach them the right from wrong. But your b**ch a** -- you're trying to be a fake a** Charlamagne."

After the interview gained virality, Ebro took to Twitter to explain that he was trying to have a balanced conversation, and that he wasn't trying to "bait" Kodak for views.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

@cthagod @theshaderoom @balleralert @worldstar make sho y’all tell em I said it .. @kodakblack @djepps

A post shared by Trick Daddy Dollars (@trickdaddydollars) on Dec 13, 2018 at 8:15am PST

READ MORE: We're Looking At Y'all: Hip-Hop Won't Have A 'Me Too' Moment Because Of Apologists

Continue Reading
Ebro Darden caught the Internet's wrath after calling out Kodak Black for sexual assault during an interview.
Getty Images

We're Looking At Y'all: Hip-Hop Won't Have A 'Me Too' Moment Because Of Apologists

Ebro Darden — the host of Hot 97 FM’s radio show Ebro In The Morning — caught the ire of the Internet Wednesday evening (Dec. 12) after a clip from an interview with 21-year-old rapper Kodak Black made the rounds. The longtime radio personality merely admonished and acknowledged the rapper’s recent sexual assault cases, including one that he is currently awaiting trial for. While Ebro noted he wouldn’t be able to go into details since the case is ongoing, he did take a moment to acknowledge that sexual assault is serious, and the discussion will not be ignored in the future.

“Respect to everybody involved in that case, we can’t get into details today… We take sexual assault here serious,” “El Viejo Ebro” exclaimed. “We can’t get into details, but we hope to have you back so that we can have a deeper conversation about that. It’s a serious topic, we’re hearing these stories a lot.” No more than two minutes later, the interview was over, as a visibly uncomfortable Kodak, legal name Bill K. Kapri, stated that the media is “entertained” by “bullsh*t” before leaving.

For some asinine reason, Ebro — a man whose job it is to interview musicians about life and their craft — was the one getting the heat for bringing up the allegations. The uproar was not given to the alleged sexual offender, but to the host acknowledging the wrongdoing by the alleged sexual offender.

Label booked him. I didn’t force anything. I was attenpting to make sure a huge issue was not ignored. https://t.co/vnl0JqeLfi

— El Viejo Ebro (@oldmanebro) December 13, 2018

Earlier this year, Buzzfeed posed the question: “Will Time Ever Be Up For Abusive Men In Hip-Hop?” Due to the fans, some media personalities and the higher powers continuing to insulate these artists and avoiding discussion of the elephants in the room, it won’t — at least for the time being.

Fans of the Florida MC ignorantly tweeted that Ebro is likely working “with the Feds” for bringing up the sexual assault allegation proves that time will not be up anytime soon for men who allegedly abuse women in the game.

Due to many fans’ beliefs that hosts and journalists should “stick to asking artists about music” — and not the controversial lives often documented and discussed more than the careers that provide them bread and butter on the table — time will not be up. A similar “demand” came up earlier this year, when Laura Ingraham said LeBron James should just “shut up and dribble” instead of using his platform to discuss politics.

Then, there are media personalities like Peter Rosenberg, who during the Kodak interview aimed to deflect from the situation at hand by asking about the moon landing of 1969, in order to make Kodak feel a bit more comfortable (although his status in the hip-hop game despite his documented wrongdoing certainly makes some uncomfortable as well).

We also can’t ignore the woman on the panel, Laura Stylez, who chose to stay silent instead of using her platform and her voice to stand up for the women allegedly affected by Kodak’s behavior, or women in general. As a woman, her silence rubbed me the wrong way entirely.

These two, however, are not the only problematic personalities. DJ Akademiks, YouTuber turned host of Complex’s Everyday Struggle, often discusses his relationship with embattled musician Tekashi 6ix9ine.

“I’m a little sad… but these are the decisions that got here,” Ak, real name Livingston Allen, said in a recent episode of the YouTube series regarding Tekashi’s recent high-profile racketeering arrest and possibility of life in jail. However, he continued to acknowledge that the young man is his n***a, and has not appeared to call out Tekashi for the allegations against him in terms of sexual misconduct.

It doesn’t appear he’s discussed his homie’s sexual misconduct charges head-on since 2014. Even in this particular interview, it appears that the 27-year-old was being more of an apologist for his friend, stating that “[he] could tell [Tekashi] was young, and obviously not thinking straight.”

Is this insulation of musicians who lead perilous lives a way to hold on to the clout these personalities have obtained? Or, is it realizing that if they stop defending these artists as a way to defend those who are hurt, they’ll lose a legion of equally as troublesome fans and followers in the process? Why not attempt to discuss the difficult topic at hand with as much discretion as possible, instead of getting a biased view of the story for clicks?

I know that as a woman in hip-hop, hip-hop doesn’t always love me back, but if this isn’t a slap in the face? To have this conversation occur in the same week that Cyntoia Brown was told she had to serve 51 years in prison for defending herself against a potential rapist, it’s infuriating to have to write about the blatant disregard and disrespect for the well-being of women in society in a field that I hold dear to my heart.

Due to the “separating artists from art” thought-process, especially in such a male-dominated industry and genre, it’s unsurprising that this is the response Ebro received for calling out wrongdoing.

This is the same thought process that allows R. Kelly to continue to tour despite well-documented instances of sexual misconduct for 25 years.

This is the same thought-process that causes music fans to lash out at Vic Mensa for “vehemently rejecting the trend in hip-hop of championing abusers”; although many would argue that he wasn’t the proper messenger to convey such a statement, the intentionality in the statement was appreciated by many.

On a grander scale, this is the same apologist thought-process that placed Brett Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court and Donald Trump in the White House… and look at how well that’s going.

If we continue this trend of protecting the men in the game and not putting the well-being of the minority consumers of the genre into consideration (such as women and members of the LGBTQ community), hip-hop could be headed to a very murky place. While I don’t always agree with Ebro Darden, I applaud his effort in attempting to start a conversation that can’t continue to be ignored any longer, especially as a man with a platform in the hip-hop media space.

As hip-hop fans, we should aim to hold these artists accountable for their lyrics, comments and behavior. We can’t argue that they’re not hurting anyone through these things just because you don’t feel threatened, because best believe, someone does.

Whatever side of the fence you’re on, Ebro, Vic and other men attempting to hold these artists accountable is a small step on a long journey. While it’s clear that consumers are more interested in the music these people put out than the lives they lead, it would behoove all of us to take a long look at the state of the game beyond the bars and beats.

READ MORE: Ebro Calls Out Kodak Black For Sexual Assault During Interview

Continue Reading

Top Stories