Murs' Blog: Remembering Guru

"All I did was give a muthafucka a pound and a compliment and I was out. Told'em my name. Peace." - Guru, "Intro (The First Step)" from the album Hard To Earn

As a teenager yearning to be "on" in the mid 90's these were words to live by, straight from the mouth of a hip-hop legend. As a youngster, I heard this speech for the first time in the front seat of my mom's car coming from the midnight release Gang Starr had at the Tower Records on Sunset Blvd. I was in LOOOOVE with their new single "Massappeal." I mean, had triples of it on vinyl and would play it over and over every morning before school.

So after a month or so of that my big homie DJ Rob One (RIP), a rep for EMI at the time, told me they would be doing a midnight release. I immediately start begging moms. She conceded. I'm sure only after I did heaps of extra chores. The big night comes I run into the store, buy the album. Thank my mom, she was now "the greatest mom ever!!" of course. Smiling in her face, knowing that I would be disappointing her a mere 8 hrs later.

You see, me and my boy Jedi already had plans to ditch school the next morning and go to the official Gang Starr meet and greet/signing at the Wherehouse. Anyway, being the awesome parent she is. My mom wants to hear this new CD that has her up at midnight and her usually melancholy teenage son bursting with joy.

I put it in and as I'm hearing these infamous "words to live by" all she hears is the word "muthafucka" more than 3 times in less than a 45 so she snatches it out and starts going ballistic. "She can't believe" this "Never has she heard" that and it went on and on the whole ride home. The whole time I'm just thinking "Ok, when you meet Guru tomorrow you must follow these new rules. A pound, a compliment, your name the peace get the fuck out of there."

I'll never forget that night and how after that I stayed up listening to it in the dark. Still happy even though moms bugged out. And to this day it's one of my favorite albums. Years later, I'd be opening up for him on tour with Atmosphere in Canada. A "real rapper" now, I wanted to still follow these rules. I didn't pester him I just played it cool. A pound, some respect and that was it.

What I did do though, was try to put on the show of a lifetime. I don't even think it was a conscious effort. But somewhere inside of me, I knew Guru was watching. Lol. So when it came to the part of my show where I would usually do the splits. Smh. I had to take it to the bridge. Usually it was just a spin and then a drop into the splits. But this was a "special" night so I jumped up as I high as I could and landed in the splits. My god it hurt like hell! I bruised my tail bone and barely made it through my set. I couldn't even sit down in the tour van. For the next two weeks I had to lay down face first on one of the bench seats

All that to say, true greatness inspires everyone around them. Even if his greatness inspired me to ditch school or injure myself. I know that I'm better for it. The times I did meet him he was a cool humble cat. Never once did I rush him with that "remember me" or "listen to my demo" bullshit. Why? Cuz he taught me better than that. And a lot of you upcoming cats could stand to learn a lot from this man. You can start by going out and getting Hard To Earn. The man can teach you volumes. The intro alone has changed my life. Thank you and Rest In Power GURU.

From the Web

More on Vibe

Kevin Winter/Getty Images for dcp

Chadwick Boseman’s Brother Marks 2-Year Anniversary Of Cancer Being In Remission

Chadwick Boseman’s older brother was also battling cancer at the same time as the Black Panther star. Kevin Boseman, 48, recently marked the two-year anniversary of his cancer being in remission.

The professional dancer revealed the health update on his Instagram Story. A screen grab of the post was captured by The Shaderoom earlier this week. "I was diagnosed with cancer in 2018 and underwent four rounds of chemotherapy," he wrote. ”I’m in remission!!!!! You read right. I am in remission. Today marks my official two-year remission anniversary. October 14, 2020."

The Boseman’s brother’s include Derrick Boseman, a 54-year-old pastor. The grieving brother’s opened up about Chadwick in a New York Times piece published in early October.

“I have been trying to remember Chad and not Chadwick, and there’s just been a lot of Chadwick in the air,” Kevin said adding that when a family member is also a celebrity, “You have to start sharing that person with the world. I always endeavored to just treat him like my brother.”

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by KEVIN BOSEMAN (@kevinboseman) on Nov 29, 2019 at 7:58am PST

Years before he made it big, Chadwick moved to New York City to chase his acting dreams. He lived with Kevin, who became a successful dancer, touring with Alvin Ailey's dancer theater, and appearing in a stage production of The Lion King.

In 2016, Chadwick was diagnosed with cancer just as his career began to take off. He kept the diagnosis out of the public eye and continued to film movies in between undergoing treatment. After an arduous four-year battle, Chadwick succumbed to the disease in August. The day before his passing, Chadwick told Pastor Boseman, “Man, I’m in the fourth quarter, and I need you to get me out of the game.”

Continue Reading
Courtesy of Sprite/Michael Zorn

2 Chainz, Rapsody, And Yara Shahidi Team Up With Sprite For 'Create Your Future' Voting Initiative

With the 2020 election season underway, 2 Chainz, Rapsody, and Yara Shahidi have teamed up with Sprite for their Create Your Future voting campaign. According to a press release, the beverage brand's non-partisan initiative is aiming to "inspire and educate young Black and multicultural voters" to head to the polls this year.

To drive the message, six emerging Black artists were also tapped to create artwork inspired by the importance of voting—photographer Yvette Glasco, fashion designer BLUBOY, illustrator Neka King, artist Sage Guillory, fashion designer Dorothy Lawes, and artist Foremost. 2 Chainz, Shahidi, and Rapsody will be using their platforms to promote the artists' work while encouraging the youth around America.

2 Chainz—who joined forces with Sprite to support DJs who have been financially impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic over the summer—will be using art by up-and-coming creators to inspire the youth to get out and vote. "Sprite has a long history of putting on artists and tastemakers in hip-hop," pointed out the award-winning artist. "Now I’m teaming up with Sprite again for the Create Your Future campaign, which encourages Black and multicultural youth to learn about the different ways to vote. No matter your background or where you live, it’s important to educate yourself on the candidates, their policies, and the process to vote.”

“Sprite’s Create Your Future initiative is about harnessing the brilliance and power of Black creative expression to empower myself and my peers to get creative, get informed, and exercise our right to vote in the upcoming election," said grownish actress and social activist, Yara Shahidi. "I am excited to utilize my platform to amplify the voices of emerging creators and encourage meaningful action through everyday civic engagement.”

“I’m proud to be a part of Sprite’s Create Your Future voting initiative. We’re working with several incredibly talented young artists who created these beautiful, powerful pieces – from fashion, to illustration, to photography – centered around their reasons for voting," added Grammy-nominated artist Rapsody. "I’ll be passing the mic to elevate their work and tell their stories. As an artist, I love telling stories, especially when they come from a real place and from people striving to create a better future for our communities.”

Check out some of the artists' pieces of work down below. For more information and additional resources on how to make your voice hear during this election, visit Sprite.com/CreateYourFuture.

Continue Reading
2020HHA/Getty Images via Getty Images

2020 BET Hip Hop Awards: Watch Performances From City Girls, Big Sean, 2 Chainz And More

City Girls, Big Sean, Jhené Aiko, Brandy, 2 Chainz, and more made the 2020 BET Hip-Hop Awards a night to remember. Hosted by DC Young Fly, Karlous Miller and Chico Bean of 85 South, the socially-distanced event went down on Tuesday (Oct. 27).

Doubling as a sounding board for socially conscious commentary and voting engagement, the show featured several references to Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and other victims of police brutality. The night included a statement from vice presidential hopeful and Howard University alum, Kamala Harris, in celebration of HBCU’s.

Although there were more performances than awards given out during the ceremony, the show was full of surprises. Master P received the I Am Hip Hop Award presented to him by former No Limit artist, Snoop Dogg. Rapsody won her first award ever for Best Hip-Hop Lyricist, Pop Smoke was posthumously awarded the Best New Artist trophy, and Lil Baby accepted the Impact Track honor for, “The Bigger Picture.”

YBN Cordae paid homage to Juice Wrld, and Quavo performed a tribute medley to Pop Smoke. The award show also honored other late rappers, including Fred Da Godson.

Watch some of the performances and cyphers below.

City Girls Perform “Kitty Talk” & “Jobs” Big Sean, Jhené AIko and Ty Dolla Sign Perform “Body Language” Brandy, Erykah Badu, Teyana Taylor & H.E.R. Perform Ladies First Cypher Beenie Man, Bounty Killa, Skip Marley & More Participate In Reggae Cypher Tobe Nwigwe Performs “Try Jesus, Don’t Try Me” 2 Chainz & Lil Wayne Perform “Money Maker”
Continue Reading

Top Stories