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10 Rappers Who Have Gotten Caught Crying

We might be dating ourselves a little bit here. But, remember Tom Hanks' memorable quote in the 1992 movie, A League of Their Own? "There's no crying!" he yelled at one player (played by Madonna) who started to tear up in the middle of a game after he yelled at her. "There's no crying in baseball!"

Well, the same can be said for rap. There's no crying in rap! Rappers are supposed to be tough, macho manly men, not sniffling little crybabies. And yet, every now and then we catch one of them crying. The latest one to get caught? Soulja Boy, who had tears streaming down his face during the Whitney Houston tribute at the 2012 BET Awards on Sunday night. We can't necessarily fault him for it—after all, there were plenty of watery eyes all across the nation at that moment—but never in a million years did we expect to see Mr. Tell 'Em showing so much emotion out in public.

Soulja Boy is far from the first rapper to get caught crying, though. In fact, there have been a number of rappers who have turned on the waterworks over the years. So, after seeing Soulja Boy's outburst, we decided to put together a list of 10 Rappers Who Have Gotten Caught Crying. We can only imagine what Tom Hanks would have thought if he'd seen these guys bawling their eyes out.—Chris Yuscavage

The Rapper: Kanye West
Where He Cried: On Jay Leno's primetime show in September 2009
Why He Did It: A couple weeks after he interrupted Taylor Swift's acceptance speech at the 2009 MTV Video Music Awards, 'Ye sat down with Leno to apologize to Swift, to explain his actions, and to talk about the passing of his mother. "Obviously, I deal with hurt," he said, before shedding a few tears, "and so many celebrities, they never take the time off. I've never taken the time off to really [grieve]."

The Rapper: Young Buck
Where He Cried: On a phone call with 50 Cent in June 2008
Why He Did It: While discussing his ouster from 50's G-Unit clique, Buck broke down in tears and couldn't control his emotions. "I don't know what to do," he said. "A n---- just want that same family feel like it's always been. I know I'm outta line, I don't want you to dismember me from the crew, honestly…I'm just trying to make you happy." To make matters worse, Fif then leaked the conversation to the media.

The Rapper: Game
Where He Cried: During a video interview about his song dedicated to Sean Bell in July 2008
Why He Did It: The Compton MC was upset that all of the rappers he reached out to to appear on "911 Is A Joke" refused to be a part of the song. "Nobody wanna stand up and be a man," he said. "We don't have a problem putting out a mixtape dissing each other, but…the situations that render us helpless like police brutality, excessive force, people using the shield to really deal the wrong way with human beings, you know, like nobody wanna stand up for that except me."

The Rapper: Kid Cudi
Where He Cried: On Twitter in December 2011
Why He Did It: Okay, so we didn't actually see Cudi cry. But, after one of his biggest fans Ben Breedlove died shortly after uploading a series of videos that showcased how much he loved Cudi, the Ohio rapper got on Twitter and shared a message of his own. "I am so sad about Ben Breedlove," he said. "I watched the video he left for the world to see," he tweeted. "I broke down, I am to tears because I hate how life is so unfair."

The Rapper: Big Sean
Where He Cried: Before a concert in Toronto in January 2011
Why He Did It: Not all rappers cry because they're sad. Sean let out a few "tears of joy" after he received an overwhelming response from fans at a meet-and-greet. "I came in here and started shedding tears because I was so happy," he said. "You don't even understand, man."

The Rapper: Kanye West
Where He Cried: At a concert in London in November 2007
Why He Did It: Just about a week after 'Ye's mother passed away, he did a show during his European concert and tried to perform "Hey Mama." But, he couldn't get through it and started crying midway through the song.

The Rapper: Maino
Where He Cried: In the middle of a concert in New York in May 2009
Why He Did It: Just a few days after his brother got shot in the back by police, Maino decided to share the info at a show. That resulted in him shedding a whole bunch of tears. "The police shot my best friend in the back," he said. "They tellin' me he might not walk again.

The Rapper: DMX
Where He Cried: On the show, Couples Therapy, in April 2012
Why He Did It: He tried to get his mother to explain why she never told him that she loved when he was younger. "Why?" he asked her. "I just wanted to say…I just wanted to say, 'Mommy'…" That's all he could get out.

The Rapper: Lil Mama
Where She Cried: On the Power 105.1 morning show, "The Breakfast Club," in July 2011
Why She Did It: Male rappers aren't the only ones who shed tears! In the middle of a sit-down with DJ Envy, Angela Yee, and Charlamagne tha God, Lil Mama started crying when Charlamagne took some shots at her music and her physical appearance during the course of the interview. "When I was 17 years old, I put out an album while my mother was dying of cancer," she said. "That right there alone is a struggle. That's hard. That's tough for anybody."

The Rapper: Kanye West
Where He Cried: On stage at the Coachella festival in April 2011
Why He Did It: Kanye really cries a lot, huh?! While performing songs off My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, 'Ye suddenly broke out in tears while talking about the process of recording the album. "When I made the album, I was in a really dark place in my life…losing everything that was dear to me," he said. "To still love me after everything you've seen me say on TV…to still have fans…I really appreciate you all tonight, because I'm only trying to say and do what's right."

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