G-Unit's Mike Knox Went On Hot 107.9 & Confirmed That He Has Gunplay's Chain
G-Unit's Mike Knox Confirms That He Has Gunplay's Chain

G-Unit's Mike Knoxx Claims to Have Gunplay's Chain

Mike Knox, coming out of G-Unit's camp, kept it all the way real in his latest interview about the now-infamous Gunplay brawl at the 2012 BET Hip-Hop Awards.

While on Hot 107.9 in Philly, Knox explained his side of the story—even revealing what appeared to be Gunplay's stolen chain. There's no video (yet), but the audio pretty much confirmed that Knox may be rolling around with some new jewelry.

Check out the full interview below:

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Kodak Black Says He Was "Just Bullsh*ttin'" About Young M.A. Comments

Kodak Black received backlash earlier this week after he attempted to make advances at Young M.A. After she rejected him, he then appeared to take jabs at her sexual orientation. Now, the Florida native has come forward, stating that he was "just bullsh*ttin'" about his previous comments.

"Bruh, be realistic. I am too fly for that shit. And I got too much 'resources' to go that route," Kodak said addressing the controversy on Instagram Live on Thursday (Mar. 21). "I was just bullshittin', man," the rapper joked. "I know I be jiving. I be jiving around and shit like that y'all know me. And leave her alone!.. Lot of people be sensitive on the internet and in life. People go to saying crazy shit... like come on now."

As previously reported, Kodak was accused of sexual harassment for making suggesting comments about Young M.A. on his song "Pimpin' Ain't Easy." After the Brooklyn artist responded, he questioned her sexual preferences. "How you a girl but don't want your p***y penetrated? How?" He asked. "Don't be mad at me because I want you, baby. Don't be mad at me cuz I want you."

Kodak didn't waste any time moving on to the next troll though. The rapper recorded a new Instagram Live earlier claiming to be on the same level as Biggi, Tupac, and Nas. "I'm the hardest rapper in the game I promise," Kodak said. "Like, when you talk 'bout me, you should put me in a category of like 'Pac, B.I.G, Nas, them n***s, you feel me? Like really listen to my shit. I don't care about how I act, like, on the 'gram."

Watch his latest comments in the video above.

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‘American Soul’ Episode 8 Recap: The Crossroads

Tessa is back, and not only do we finally get the tea on her backstory, but it’s also a full tea party.

Still focused on reclaiming her dance career before she’s too old, Tessa prepares for an audition and comes face to face with her former best friend and former fiancé—the very people who drove her away from dance years ago. We learn that she didn’t just lose her dance career, she lost an entire life—including a baby. And then, she met Patrick. Over the course of the episode, Tessa has long overdue conversations with Prescott, her former fiancé, and Evelyn (Nikeva Stapleton), her former friend. Even though Evelyn played Tessa back in the day, she drops some gems and asks her if she’s really moving forward, or trying to hold on to what was. Tessa ponders the question and, in response, delivers a final audition routine she created during her old dance life in Germany, updated with moves influenced by the Soul Train Gang—a reflection of her new life. After finally having an honest, vulnerable conversation with Patrick, it seems Tessa is ready to genuinely move forward, whatever that may mean.

JT’s brothers in the Continuous Revolution in Progress offer him a chance to “prove (his) worth,” after Detective Lorraine set him up to look like a snitch (which we still don’t understand). Of course, that means participating in another illegal endeavor. We really don’t like Reggie, nor can we understand why JT feels such a staunch loyalty to him, but peer pressure—and thinly veiled threats—are real.

When JT gets “home,” he faces another course-altering decision. After finding a random street character holding his little sister while his mom is in a mid-drug nod, JT finally makes the difficult call to have her committed. We’d be relieved and excited about what this means for him and his little sister if he hadn’t just become more deeply entangled with Reggie and the CRIPS.

The Clarke siblings are ready to assert their independence. Kendall is taking his John Denver albums and moving out (with Flo? Already?); Simone is bucking up to her mom about JT (Simone, your mama might be right on this one); and Encore gets a surprise half-off deal at the studio to record their demo. We owe JT—who we realize is not a real person—an apology for assuming he was going to lose the studio money. He had it in his sock. Smart man. But holding the money might be the only role JT plays in Encore’s recording. While the Clarke siblings are stanning over Lionel Richie and getting ready to go in the booth, JT is at the hospital with his mom. We have a feeling his path will only take him further away from both Kendall and Simone for the last two episodes of the season.

Brianne comes face-to-face with the old life and dream she buried out of necessity for the life she chose to have with Joseph. At the beginning of the season, Joseph mentioned Brianne’s former singing career to Simone, and Simone was shocked even as her mother deflected. But she clearly never let it go—seeing a reminder of her singing days sends Brianne into a rage. Not because something terrible happened (that we know of, yet), but because she’s still so hurt over sacrificing such a big piece of herself. When Nate asks her if she wants to cut the visit to San Diego and her brother’s nightclub short, she says she needs to do something first. Is Brianne going to let the music back in?

Don already made one choice: Soul Train over his family. Now, he faces a fight for the show to survive against Dick Clark’s Soul Show, which airs on ABC, one of Don’s essential syndication partners. The next decision is whether to trust the protest and boycott methods suggested by his friend Conrad Johnson (Todd Anthony Manaigo) or take a more ruthless route with Gerald. Frustrated when the civil course doesn’t seem to be working quickly enough, Don lets Gerald off the leash to execute an alternate plan. But when he realizes Gerald’s tactic—placing plants at the Soul Show protest to start a fight—Don’s bothered. Especially when Conrad’s method ends up yielding results. Don will always be in conflict because he’s rarely comfortable with his decisions. When he operates in the straight and narrow, he feels like he’s being taken advantage of; when he plays dirty, he worries about his public image. When Don tries to detach himself from Gerald’s antics, Gerald checks him. He’s already peeped Don’s struggle between being the respectable negro and being a street dude when the situation requires. “It ain’t like you didn’t know, you just chose not to.”

Don’s hot-and-heavy relationship with Ilsa has fizzled out, Tessa’s quit, Brooks doesn’t see the big deal about a competitive show, and Gerald’s idea of being supportive is sketchy at best, highly illegal at worst. Don has presumably slayed the Hollywood dragons that tried to take him down and should feel victorious. Soul Train is a hit, is officially greenlit for a second season, and is still his. But Don’s realizing he doesn’t have true, close allies around him (Clarence Avant once said of Cornelius in real life that you could fit all his friends in a phone booth, and still have room). Delores is not only ignoring his phone calls—more phone calls than we’ve seen him make the entire season—she’s busy with plans that involve separate bank accounts. Don calls his wife one more time to plead for their marriage on the brand new answering machine he bought her. As he hangs up and the episode closes, he collapses—an early glimpse of the brain trauma that plagued him for the remainder of this life.

What the episode got right: Conrad “CJ” Johnson represents young Jesse Jackson, who partnered with the “Godfather of Black Music,” Clarence Avant, in successfully pressuring ABC to take Clark’s Soul Unlimited off the air.

What we could have done without: The scene with Gladys and Don in the lounge. While it was great to see Kelly Rowland reprise her role as Gladys Knight, and we recognize that she’s supposed to serve as some kind of conscious/guide/good luck charm/something for Don, that conversation didn’t move the plot forward in any real way.

What we absolutely don’t believe: That a black mother in the 1970s—the old school black mama prototype—let somebody call her daughter an “uppity b**ch,” then let the same daughter get in her face and slam doors in her house without some hands flying, somebody getting cursed out, or that door coming off the hinges.

What we don’t understand: The relationship between Brianne and Private Nate Barker. He’s fine and all, but what’s his purpose? Maybe there’s more to come in the next episodes.

We’re excited to learn more about Brianne Clarke in the next episode; she’s been an underutilized character so far. There’s a lot to cover, still, in the remaining two shows of the season: Is Simone going to pursue a career in NY? Is JT going to get his foolish self arrested or worse? Is Kendall going to end up with another baby he can’t support? (We feel like Flo has more sense than that, thankfully). Is Brianne going to get it poppin’ with Nate? Is Don going to somehow end up on Gerald’s bad side? We do know Don is getting a divorce, we just don’t know when. Let’s see what happens next.

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Waka Flocka Calls Daniel Caesar "Stupid" For Viral Race Video

Daniel Caesar landed in the hot seat this week when he shared a video on Instagram Live that appeared to reprimand black people for being "too sensitive."  Many critics had plenty of rebuttals to Caesar's comments, but according to Waka Flocka and his wife Tammy Rivera, it's pretty simple: don't talk about black people ever again.

TMZ caught up with the couple on Wednesday (Mar. 20). "He said 'get over it'? Yo, make sure you stay the fuck away from me because we might 'get over' on yo' ass. Don't you ever in your life talk about black people like that. You stupid," Waka said. The rapping was referring to Caesar's nationality.

Rivera then chimed in: "He's from Canada, okay so he doesn't know what's going on. He's Canadian. Tell him to drive down the street in a car and speed and get pulled over by two white cops then he'll figure out why."

As previously reported, Caesar's livestream specifically addressed the recent conversation surrounding social media star YesJulz and her position in hip-hop culture (she was criticized for mentioning black professionals including Scottie Beam and Karen Civil during an interview). In the video, the "Best Part" singer seemingly defended YesJulz and suggested that the black people learn how to take a joke.

"Why is it that we're allowed to be disrespectful and rude to everybody else and when anybody else returns any type of energy to us—that's not equality," he said in the livestream. "I don't wanna be treated like I can't take a joke."

Watch Waka Flocka and Tammy Riveras' comments on Daniel Caesar in the video above.

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