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Kesha Responds To "Die Young" Controversy On Twitter

Ke$ha may be the poster child for the young and the reckless but her recent single has brought some unforeseen difficulties.

Radio stations removed her latest single "Die Young" from the rotation because of its controversial title in light of the tragic Sandy Hook controversy. She took to Twitter to address the concerns: "i understand. I had my very own issue with "Die Young" for this reason. i did NOT want to sing those lyrics and i was FORCED TO."

As previously reported, "Die Young" was coasting at #3 on the radio playlists on Friday (Dec. 14), the day of the tragic shooting, where it reached 167 million listeners nationwide. By Saturday, the day after the shooting, airplay dropped by 3 million listeners. By this week, the pop smash dropped down to 148 million listeners—a 19 million drop from its previous potation.

At least the sassy songbird has taken the push back in stride and is more concerned about those affected by the horrific Newtown events. "I'm so so so sorry for anyone who has been effected by this tragedy," she wrote. "And I understand why my song is now inappropriate. words cannot express."

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LaVar Ball Is Requesting $3,500 From Anyone Planning On Recording Son During Tournament

As we know, LaVar Ball goes above and beyond in terms of making sure his sons become the superstar basketball players he wants them to be. His youngest son LaMelo is currently playing for SPIRE Institute in Ohio, and they have an upcoming tournament taking place in Kentucky. Mr. Ball is reportedly asking outlets to pay $3,500 at the door to videotape his son playing.

"All games are free to film except for the Spire Institute games,” an email reportedly sent by LaVar read. “To film either of the 2 Spire Institute games, you will have to present $3,500 at the gate, as per rules of the Big Baller Brand media credential… If you accept these conditions, you may present this email at the gate as proof of our approval where you will be given a media pass.”

While a few Internet folks are scoffing at the idea of having to pay that sort of money, others are pointing out the fanbase of LaMelo, stating that there are outlets who certainly would (and have) paid the fee for the chance to record LaMelo and SPIRE moments from the game. According to Forbes, this is one of many revenue streams for the Ball family.

"The Ball Sports Group in November entered into a partnership with FloSports Inc. to live stream five SPIRE games featuring LaMelo, beginning with one on Tuesday (Jan. 14) at Brush High School in Ohio," the site reports. "FloSports Inc. agreed to pay $5,000 per game, according to the contract which was signed by Foster."

Here's the email telling video outlets they must pay $3,500 to film LaMelo and @SpireBasketball this weekend in Kentucky. pic.twitter.com/XoiiorNxVr

— Adam Zagoria (@AdamZagoria) January 17, 2019

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Big Boi Purchases Studio Where OutKast First Began Their Career

Big Boi is going back to his roots with the recent purchase of the Atlanta recording studio — legendarily dubbed The Dungeon — where he and Andre 3000 recorded their classic albums at the beginning of their OutKast career, WSB-TV reports.

The veteran rapper, born Antwan Patton, announced the news via Instagram. The studio is located in the Lakewood Heights neighborhood. The studio once served as the hub for production crew Organized Noize, creating the beats for some of OutKast’s biggest hits.

 

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New day new Lot ... Just copped the Dungeon #WeDF #playingRealLifeMonopoly #RealEstate

A post shared by Big Boi (@bigboi) on Jan 16, 2019 at 10:54am PST

The Dungeon also served as a beacon of creativity for the group. In addition to OutKast recording their 1994 debut album Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik, they also recorded 1996’s ATLiens and 1998’s Aquemini at The Dungeon.

Deep in the Dungeon 👑 pic.twitter.com/IFLLONpSzp

— Big Boi (@BigBoi) January 16, 2019

In buying The Dungeon, Big Boi is securing an important piece of hip-hop history, especially considering how popular Atlanta has become in the entertainment industry. However, this wasn't always the case. In an interview with Rolling Stone, he admits that Atlanta wasn't always respected in creative circles like it is now.

“When we first started, it wasn’t cool to be from Atlanta,” he said. “Now Atlanta is the place to be with music, film, and television. To have people excited about the city and the culture and the lifestyle, I’m very proud of that. We’re the pioneers of it, and we’re still at the forefront of what’s happening. There’s plenty of people over the years, hundreds if not thousands like, ‘[1994 LP] Southernplayalistic … made me move to Atlanta.’ There’s no greater place in the world to be but A-Town.”

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Louisville International Airport To Be Renamed After Muhammad Ali

Louisville, Kentucky's hometown hero will have an airport named after him.

Mayor Greg Fischer announced Wednesday (Jan. 16) that the Louisville International Airport will be renamed after Muhammad Ali.

"Muhammad Ali belonged to the world, but he only had one hometown, and fortunately, that is our great city of Louisville," Fischer said.

"Muhammad became one of the most well-known people to ever walk the earth and has left a legacy of humanitarianism and athleticism that has inspired billions of people."

The city is hoping to finalize the renaming of the Louisville International Airport to the Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport by June. The news was shared a day before the two year anniversary of Ali's 2016 death. Ali would've been 77.

Officials with the Louisville airport are currently working on receiving approval from Ali's family, however, they say an agreement is near. The decision for the rename to hopefully increase tourism.

"It is important that we, as a city, further champion The Champ's legacy," the mayor added. "And the airport renaming is a wonderful next step."

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