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Did Paul Mooney Go Too Far With His Boston Comments?

The discussion about Paul Mooney's tasteless 'joke' about the recent Boston bombing have hit the ether. Was he just being a crass comedian? Or did he take it too far?

The legendary funnyman has come under fire after he decided to deliver a super tasteless 'joke' at Levity Live comedy club about the recent Boston bombing. He sure did shock the community. Now, with Mooney in the hot seat, people pissed off and wanting him to apologize, Hollywood Street King reports what happened. Though the manager wasn't present during the show, sources say that during the comedian's routine he said, "White people in Boston deserved what they got and [it was] OK to lose a few limbs ... and as long as no Blacks got hurt, it was OK."

Shiryn Soriano of Monsey said she couldn't understand why Mooney would make such comments. "Either he's on drugs or he's a weirdo," she said. "He's insensitive, rude and has no heart. He has no sympathy."

Mooney's publicist has yet to respond to requests for comments.

Jacky Jasper recounts on his site what Mooney said to him last month at a Studio City, California Starbucks. In the best interest of the subject, you should head over there to read it in full.

Debbie Keller, a publicist for the club, released a statement Monday saying Mooney's behavior was unacceptable and not condoned by Levity Live. Mooney's show for Sunday evening was canceled and refunds were offered to offended guests, the statement said. "Although live stand-up comedy can be edgy and sometimes push subjects to the limit, this time the material went too far at the expense of last week's tragedy," Keller wrote. "The management of Levity Live would like to offer its sincere apologies to its patrons and the City of Boston for Mooney's insensitivity and distasteful material."

What say you, accidental racists? Were the offending remarks a cry for attention to the growing disparities between the races? Was there any excuse in Paul Mooney's display of ignorance? Leave your concerns and thoughts below.

Props: Mighty Casey / HSK

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Swizz Beatz Brings Something Different To Mariott Bonvoy Amex Customers

Before becoming one of hip-hop's superproducers and graduating from Harvard Business School, Kasseem Dean was just a kid from The Bronx who gravitated to the art he saw. Whether it was the graffiti on the trains and the brick walls or the fashion of the late 80s and early 90s, Dean, better known as Swizz Beatz, digested it all.

Now, with a few hits and Grammy's under his belt, the 40-year-old multihyphenate's newest muse is the upliftment of other living artists by way of The Dean Collection. Collaborating with American Express and Marriott Bonvoy, a new travel program for Mariott International, Swizz Beatz, premiered his latest art installation "Deluxxe Fluxx" inside Manhattan's Skylight Studios.

Created by Brooklyn-based duo Faile & Bäst, members of the media, musicians, art lovers and more were able to take part in the immersive experience, which featured neon-colored lights, old-school arcade games, and music that wasn't "regular," as Swizz said.

Before the night's activities began, VIBE caught up with  Mr. Dean to discuss the newest addition to the collection, what art has done for him and what he thinks art is supposed to do for the masses.

How are you, Mr. Dean? I'm good. I love that you call me Mr. Dean.

Well, that's how I was raised.  Respect. Blessings. My first question to you is: The Dean Collection began in 2014 and from my understanding, you started it because you wanted to support living artists. It's one of the reasons, yes.

So, what triggered the launch? The Dean Collection started as me and my wife's personal collection because we wanted to create a museum for our kids to run when we weren't here anymore. It was all about building a legacy. But then we realized shining a light on living artists with our star power, created more star power and more synergy, more education. More! More! More! This isn't something we should keep private. This is something the masses should know and we should help hundreds of thousands of artists around the world if possible with our gift. It's just been a blessing. What is it about FAILE that you took to? Well, I've been a fan of colors and vibrations for a long time and these guys have been killing it for a long time. They're such masters of their craft. I feel our culture needs to understand FAILE and we should support them and celebrate them as creatives. I just wanted to show the culture an amazing experience and different forms of art, not only canvasses on the wall but also an immersive experience. Even the music I'm going to play tonight is not going to be regular. "I want people to know I celebrate all artists. Whether you're African-American, white, Asian, you name it. We at The Dean Collection celebrate all artists."

What is it about this kind of art, like you said not just canvasses on the wall, that feeds you? Well, it's visually and sonically stimulating. Most of us are in our heads all day-- Superfacts. dealing with what we're dealing with, so if I can bring you into a world that can take you away from negatives and bring you into a positive and a creative state of mind, then we've done a good job and that's what art is supposed to do. Art is supposed to take you to another level. Although my next show might be canvasses, this particular one in New York City I felt that we needed this in the city right now just to shake this up.

I'm a disrupter, my partners Amex and Marriott they've been disrupters as well for a long time, and it's organic. When you come in here you feel like it's about the creativity. Even though we have strong brands backing us--and all artists need strong brands to back them--but its how you collaborate with those strong brands, and the artists trust The Dean Collection to represent them well. What are you wearing? I have on vintage Dickies. This is my Father's Day gift from my wife and my kids. I have on a cool G-Shock that happened to match the vibe. I dig it. Thank you. Oh, and these shades I've got are ECOODA. My last question: You're a kid from The Bronx. Before Ruff Ryders, before Harvard Business School before you met the love of your life how did art keep you? You know, different sides of the art kept me. Growing up in The Bronx, I grew up with graffiti on the trains and on the walls. It excited me. I grew up around fashion where you painted the back of your jacket. It excited me. I grew up around DJs and music and DJing so that excited me. Those chapters have been written before, how they organically came out, I just let it flow.

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'Black And Blue' Trailer Puts Body Cam Footage Front And Center

Filmmaker Deon Taylor is making his petition known with his latest full-length feature, Black and Blue. Set in present-day New Orleans, rookie cop Alicia West (played by Oscar-nominated actress Naomie Harris) returns to her Nola roots in hopes to serve and protect. It doesn't take long, however, for West to realize being from the neighborhood means nothing when she's wearing her uniform or badge.

The trailer for the forthcoming thriller premiered Sunday night (June 23) during the 2019 BET Awards. In the three-minute spot, viewers follow West as she exits a squad car and enters an abandoned warehouse. Seconds later, she witnesses a corrupt cop (played by Frank Grillo) kill a local drug dealer.

West now becomes a target after realizing the murder was recorded on her body cam. Her problems are only compounded when local drug dealer Darius (Mike Colter, Luke Cage) is working in concert with the police and puts a bounty on West's head. Now West has a decision to make: either ignore the truth or expose it.

Dialing in from Los Angeles, Taylor spoke to VIBE about the premise of the Peter A Dowling script, the timeliness of the film and did he, in fact, give it all away in the trailer?

Why the name change from Exposure to Black and Blue? Deon Taylor: In the film, Alicia West (Naomie Harris) kept being asked 'What side of the line are you on? Are you black or are you blue?' and what I thought was incredible throughout the movie was she's saying there is no side, we're here to serve the people. We wanted to lean into that. I thought it would be a great conversation piece and it's also about blending the worlds and creating a better place for people to live. So that's why we made the change.

Is the film as much entertainment as it is a political statement? Yes. I'm going to answer yes to that. Right now, we're in a world where we don't want to feed people medicine. We want to put the medicine inside the candy. That's what I feel like this film is about.

Our first goal is to make sure you have a blast in the theater. You're getting all those elements you would get from Training Day. But, as a filmmaker, I'm also trying to drop some messages and some Easter eggs in the film. What I'm hoping is this film shows us what we need to do to be better as a people as we're fighting against what we're seeing in the news every day. What's so current is here's Alicia West, Naomie Harris playing this character saying 'Nah, we not doing that. Y'all are corrupt and I'm about to expose it. I don't care what side of the line I'm on.'

Why did you choose to film in New Orleans? We filmed in New Orleans for New Orleans. New Orleans is interesting because as we began to put the movie together, I just loved being in the South where people are really homegrown. New Orleans was one of the places that had high corruption after [Hurricane] Katrina, and we just felt like New Orleans was raw and unfiltered. I love that Naomie Harris' character had those southern morals.  The backdrop of New Orleans is also beautiful. The music, the people, the culture itself. We featured a lot of B. Mike's artwork and the murals he's done as well. Mike Colter went from being everyone's favorite black superhero in Luke Cage to this scary, menacing drug dealer. Why did you choose to reimagine Mike Colter this way? What I love about being a director is I love playing people against type. In The Intruder it was Dennis Quad and the new thriller I did it's Hilary Swank. This movie is no different. For Mike Colter, when I thought about what character he's playing without giving it away, it would be easy to cast someone to be tough and beat people up and have that energy, but Colter's character in the movie, Darius, he's more complex. He's someone who's a product of the environment but also a cerebral thinker.

So for that, I needed to find an actor that was intimidating, but when he opens up his mouth and he talks, I needed someone who had the correct tone to be a more complicated villain. What I tried to do with the Darius character was build someone I know. Colter was able to reimagine the character that way in which you can see the tough exterior, but at the same time, he's calculated in how he thinks and how he moves.

My last question is in a lot of films, they give the best stuff away in the trailer. Have you done that?  Nope! [Laughs]

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The Exonerated Five Receive A Standing Ovation At The 2019 BET Awards

Korey Wise, Raymond Santana, Kevin Richardson, Antron McCray, and Yusef Salaam had their childhoods ripped from them after being falsely accused of rape in 1989. Thirty years later, the men known as the Central Park Five have earned a new title: The Exonerated Five.

With Ava DuVernay's directed Netflix series fresh in people's minds, the now middle-aged men --who had their sentences vacated after the real rapist confessed--have merited empathy and an outpouring of love from many.

On Sunday night (June 23) they took to the stage at 19th annual BET Awards and earned a standing ovation from the crowd.

THE EXONERATED FIVE at the #BETAwards pic.twitter.com/DSxVTLGJPW

— 106 KMEL (@106KMEL) June 24, 2019

The men were on hand to introduce singer-songwriter H.E.R. Yet, before the Grammy-Award winner performed, they spoke about how their worlds collided three decades prior.

“We are all on an individual journey in life. We don’t know where our journeys will take us or how they will collide with others,” the men said. “I didn’t know that one day would bond me to these men for the rest of our lives. But I know that in telling our truth, our lives have been changed forever. Your truth is the foundation your legacy will be built upon. Your truth will be the memories people keep long after you’re gone.”

On May 31st, Netflix premiered When They See Us. The four-part series depicted the lives of all five boys prior to being arrested, illegally interrogated, tried and convicted of the beating and rape of a white female Central Park jogger. Most of the men served seven years in prison. Wise, who was 16 at the time, was sent to Rikers Island and served 14 grueling years behind bars.

In 2001, Matias Reyes confessed to the rape, which resulted in Wise's release and the rest of the group's sentence being vacated. In 2014, the men were awarded $41 million from New York City, however, a public apology was never issued.

Watch The Exonerated Five speak at the 2019 BET Awards in the video above.

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