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Walk Down Memory Lane: The Best '90s Movie Classics

The 90's was a great decade for movies and music. Before Tyler Perry’s controversial films with Kim Kardashian and Madea, Spike Lee and John Singleton took Black problems and tastefully displayed them for the world to evaluate and change.

We channeled our lives and situations through these flicks. Whether you were rocking Poetic Justice braids or looking for your brother of the night, you can't deny that the 90's was the best era for movies. The 90's produced the classics. No matter how many times we watch them, they never get old and they always bring us back to the days when life was much easier.

Flip the page to see our favorites.

 BAPS 31. B.A.P.s (1997)

"Livin' large and takin' charge!"

If you ever wondered where "ratchet" stemmed from you can thank Halle Berry and Natalie Desselle for their wild hair, long nails, outrageous outfits, and gold teeth. These tacky dancers flipped an elderly man's last days  into his best days and became Black American Princesses (B.A.Ps). This hilarious comedy, makes you forget that one of the most lustable woman portrayed the most ratchet woman.

Photo Credit: Halle Berry Fan

5 heartbeats30.  5 Heartbeats (1991)

This was a great 90's film because it told the story of former male stars through a fictitious group, the 5 Heartbeats. Told through the eyes of Robert Townsend's character, it touches on the ups and downs of a group as they deal with fast fame, dishonesty in record companies, and drugs. Through their story we were able to understand the trials and tribulations of Frankie Lymon, The Dells, The Temptations, and other groups and artist of that time.

Photo Credit: Peliculas Films

Why do fools fall in love29.  Why Do Fools Fall in Love (1998)

The 90's was truly Larenz Tate's year. Telling the story of Frankie Lymon's struggle with romance, drugs, and his career through the bitter battle of his estate, Larenz gave a compelling and adorned performance in Why Do Fools Fall in Love.

Photo Credit: Madamenoire

Bad Boys28.  Bad Boys (1995)

"We ride together, we die together, bad boys for life."

Martin Lawrence and Will Smith came together to portray narotic cops fighting the Miami drug world. Martin played the family guy while Will, aka Mike Lowry, was the lover and flashy guy. Although they fought every step of the way, they had each others back while keeping us on the edge of our seats and doubled-over with laughter. It would be eight more years until the release of the sequel but it was worth the wait.

Photo Credit: Review TM

Don't Be a Menace in South Central27. Don’t Be a Menace in South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood (1996)

It may not have been the first parody, but it's definitely is one of the most memorable ones. This Wayans-produced movie took aspects from various Black classics—Menace to Society, Juice, Boys in the Hood, Higher Learning—to create another day in the ghetto.

Photo Credit: Blu-Ray

CB426. CB4 (1993)

CB4 poked fun of the hip-hop community and we loved every bit of it. This comedic movie starring Chris Rock is about three kids who want a fast break into the music industry. Stealing the criminal background and identity of the kingpin Gusto, the trio formed "CB4" (cell block 4). If you want a laugh, CB4 is a must-see.

Photo Credit: 1994 HipHop

Higher Learning

25. Higher Learning (1995)

Remember the days when Tyra was an actress, Omar Epps was the sexiest man on TV, and Busta had dreads? Well reminisce with Higher Learning. Based on real life racial issues at Columbia University, the director heightened the depiction of skinheads and black power's turmoil.

Photo Credit: Moo Vid Ab

Strictly Business

24. Strictly Business (1991)

A mail clerk (Tommy Lee Davidson) trying to move up the corporate ladder insisted on the help of his best friend (Joseph Phillips) and future partner of a big firm. But in order for everything to work out, they have to change their images. Strictly Business is a must see especially if you work in the corporate world.

Photo Credit: Silver Business

Thin LIne Between Love and Hate23. Thin Line Between Love and Hate (1996)

Brandy (Lynn Whitfield) told crazy women how to get their revenge as she taught Darnell (Martin Lawrence) the negatives of “hit it and quit it”. Although men still haven’t learned, when this movie premiered she definitely shook up players everywhere.

Photo Credit: Photo Bucket

Booty Call22. Booty Call (1997)

Before Jamie Foxx turned into Ray and Vivica Fox dated 50 cent, they engaged in a booty call. When Rushon (Tommy Lee Davidson) and his girlfriend Nikki (Tamala Jones) hooked up Lysterine (Vivica Foxx) with bad boy Bunz (Jamie Foxx), comedy ensued. The funny movie taught the importance of safe sex as both guys went on an adventure of a lifetime to find condoms.

Photo Credit: Mov Pins

Menace II Society21.  Menace to Society (1993)

"In the end it all catches up to you!"

Menace to Society questions whether you care about living or dying as two friends Caine and O-Dog live on the edge just trying to survive in the hood.

Photo Credit: Ambrosia for Heads

Players Club20. Players Club (1998)

Even if Lisa Raye ever regrets doing this movie, it's still a classic. Before she began wearing white she taught us the fundamental rule in life: “Make that money, don’t let that money make you.” Players Club was the first and only black movie of its kind to deal with the life of a stripper. It showed all aspects of stripping, and the ugly side of rape, drugs, and abuse.

Photo Credit: New Line Cinema

Crooklyn19. Crooklyn (1996)

Inspired by the memories of growing up in a brownstone in Brooklyn in the 1970's, Crooklyn was a Spike Lee joint that focused on the life of Troy Carmichael, the only female in her family of four brothers. It's a touching and entertaining film that depicts one family's growth while reminding us that every family has problems.

Photo Credit: A Fistful of Soundtracks

Malcolm X18. Malcolm X (1992)

Denzel Washington deserved an Oscar for his role in this biopic film. This Spike Lee directed film goes from the days when Malcolm permed his hair, until he became one of the biggest leaders in the civil rights movement leading to his untimely death.

Photo Credit: Very Aware

Losing Isaiah17. Losing Isaiah (1995)

A drugged out Halle Berry gave a compelling story of one mother's fight to get her child back despite her wayward past. Berry played a drug addict who discarded her newborn in the dumpster. After finally getting her life back, she finds out her son isn't dead but adopted by a white social worker.

Photo Credit: Star Warped

Juice17. Juice (1992)

This movie evaluates what happens with power gets in the wrong hands. Would it be a stretch to say Tupac deserved more praise for his role as temperamental, gun slinging, and friend killing character Bishop? We don't think so.

Photo Credit: Madamenoire

Boomerang16.    Boomerang (1992)

Give men a taste of their own medicine? Sure why not. Sweet talking Marcus Graham (Eddie Murphy) is a wolf in a well-tailored Italian suit. He's the cat's meow until he meets his match, Jacqueline (Robin Givens), and karma turns ugly. It takes the help of a special lady for Marcus to finally learn his lesson.

Photo Credit: Pod Napisi

Jason's Lyrics

 15 Jason’s Lyric (1994)

Jada Pinkett stars in our 2nd favorite role of her 90's career: Jason's Lyric. In it, she plays a no-nonsense girl with dreams of getting far away from the hood.

Photo Credit: Marcelo Black Music

Sister Act 214. Sister Act II (1993)

Despite the original being lack luster, Whoopi Goldberg came back with a better version starring Lauryn Hill. Before Fighting Temptations and Joyful Noise, Sister Mary Clarence made you "dance til' you feel better."

Photo Credit: CDC We Three

House Party13. House Party 1 and 2 (1990-1991)

These movies captured the essence of a true house party. Before sex, drugs, and alcohol was a major concern at house parties, there was DJing, dance and rap battles. If we could take it back to the days of a real party, we’d be set.

Photo Credit: Up North

Mo Betta Blues

12. Mo' Better Blues (1990)

Gilliam may be an amazing musician but his business partner and friend tends to be the down fall of his promising career. Along the way, this sweet talking jazz player tries to keep two women happy.

Photo Credit: BET

Soul Food11. Soul Food (1997)

Before This Christmas there was Soulfood, a movie that showcased a family's struggle after the death of their matriarch. This movie reminded us all about the importance of family belonging.

Photo Credit: Cooking with the Movies

Boyz n the hood

10. Boyz N The Hood (1990)

Boyz N The Hood had a clear message: “It takes a man to raise a boy.” This movie was John Singleton’s college thesis that emphasized that a boy should never grow up without a father.

Photo Credit: Tumblr

Friday9. Friday (1995)

The hilarious duo of Smokey (Chris Tucker) and Craig (Ice Cube) set the trend of other movies to follow in its footsteps like Method Man and Redman in How High.

Photo Credit: Smoking Section

Waiting to Exhale8.  Waiting to Exhale (1995)

When everything in life tries to tear you down, it's friendships that build you up. Four women all faced with men issues rely on each other to get through them. Grab your close female friends, favorite bottle of wine, and press play to relive the times when life may have been bad, but you made it through.

Photo Credit: Dispatch Blogs

The Wood7.    The Wood (1999)

Sometimes when life takes you in different directions and you start to lose your way, you need to rely on your friends to take you back to where it all began. The Wood is the younger male version of Waiting to Exhale.  Two best friends take their drunk friend who has second thoughts on getting married, down memory lane.

Photo Credit: Sony Movie Channel

Poetic Justice5Poetic Justice (1993)

Making her film debut, as Justice, Janet Jackson alongside Lucky (Tupac) gave a compelling story of finding love when you aren't looking for it.

Photo Credit: Fan Pop
FanPop

Harlem Nights

4. Harlem Nights

"Now you're gonna shoot my pinky toe?”

One of our best and memorable acting moments of Della Reese was in Harlem Nights. The depiction of Harlem in the 80's definitely made us want to back to the Harlem Renaissance and enjoy gambling and being an honest hoe.

Photo Credit: Mov Pins

3.    New Jack City (1991)

“Am I my brother’s keeper? Yes I am.”

This movie had you questioning all your allies in your circle, while every wanna-be boss renamed themselves Nino Brown.

Photo Credit: DB Covers
Set it off
2.    Set it Off (1996)
Four women tired of their current situation and the law ruining their lives, take their friendship and financial status in their own hands. When these women said they were ride or die they meant it...literally. Frankie, Lida, Cloe, and Stony, set it off in a way we couldn’t have imagined while addressing issues in the black community such as poverty, police brutality, child welfare, and prostitution. This black version of Thelma and Louise was a classic.
Photo Credit: Live Mail

Love Jones

1.  Love Jones (1997)

"Who am I? Well, they call me Brother to the night. And right now I'm the blues in your left thigh... trying to become the funk in your right."

Darius and Nina had a love that was so pure, complicated, and passionate that we overlooked the fact that they followed none of the rules in the “Think Like a Man” manual. The chemistry between Larenz Tate and Nia Long extended past Love Jones. "My relationship with Nia is an incredible," Tate dished in a recent Vixen interview on reconnecting with his former co-star on House of Lies. "We spend more time laughing at ourselves and enjoying the fact that people want to see more of us together."

Photo Credit: Ebony

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Kim Kardashian is seen on February 7, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Gotham/GC Images)

Kim Kardashian Credited For Making Crimped Hair Cool Like Beyonce, Janet Jackson And Naomi Campbell Don't Exist

Spring is nothing without doses of cultural appropriation from those out of touch with black culture.

Insert Vogue, who decided to give props to Kim Kardashian for bringing back crimped hair on Friday (March 15). The businesswoman has been on the move lately, rocking a mix of kanekalon and yaki ponytails during fashion month, Chance The Rapper's wedding and other Kardashian-related events.

“What makes this look so modern is that the front is sleek,” explained her stylist Justine Marjan. “This gives a cool contrast to the texture.”

The texture? 

With many trends from the aughts coming back to the mainstream, this is one that hasn't really gone anywhere. But black beauty markers (layered gold chains, perfect baby hairs, name chains) paired with media ignorance and the Kardashian's own fascination with black culture has made it okay for her to receive all the props.

But we can't forget those who have slayed kanekalon, yaki and crimped styles like...

Janet Jackson

The singer's look for her comeback has been a uniform-like one, with Ms. Jackson rocking all black and her now signature ponytail.

Beyoncé

This. was. last. year. How could anyone forget this? The entertainer rocked various styles of kanekalon hair for Beychella.

There was also this amazing look at Serena Williams' wedding.

 

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A post shared by Beyoncé (@beyonce) on Nov 19, 2017 at 9:01am PST

Ruth E. Carter

The Oscar-winning designer made the look all her own while on the red carpet for Black Panther. 

Nicki Minaj

Fans of the rapper are aware her early looks included fun crimped and wavy styles. When she made to move to ditch her color wigs in 2014, she's kept the crimped styles close to her heart.

And we cannot forget about our queen, Naomi Campbell

She's owned the look her whole career, from the runway to the red carpet, Ms. Campbell has always been on the forefront of casual beautiful looks.

Social media also got wind of Vogue's post, including actor O'Shea Jackson who like many of us, is just over it.

Maaaaaaan come on now. Come ooooon now. Bringing it back? Vogue stop this https://t.co/FEGSw3GM9V

— Stone Cold Shea Jackson (@OsheaJacksonJr) March 15, 2019

https://twitter.com/SassySouthpaw20/status/1106642402448732160

https://twitter.com/riridotxo/status/1106924628851728384

Perhaps there's a bit of truth of the theories of fashion outlets trolling readers but this just deserves a permanent eye roll.

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'Boomerang' Episode 6 Recap: Homecoming

On this episode of BET’s Boomerang, the love story between Bryson and Simone begins with a flashback to their freshman year of college. After several years of not seeing one another since their childhood, Bryson is shocked to see a slick-back pony-tail wearing Simone insert herself into his class during a presentation. Nothing has changed with her. Even pre-bob and with Bryson rocking a sharp Steve Harvey-like hairline, even from their younger days, they have always been the dynamic duo of marketing strategy. The product featured this week: Pro-Black T-Shirts.

The devastation of not having his secret love in his life spills over into their sophomore year when a beanie-wearing David and Crystal are happy in their fake hood love. By this time, a rapper named Prisoner has all of Simone’s attention and this makes Bryson big mad. The man can’t even hide it. In an apparent fit of jealousy, he calls Simone out for living under her father’s shadow, in front of everyone. It’s safe to say that sophomore Bry struck out badly.

This isn’t just about Simone and Bryson; they’re not the only ones who’ve made transformations over the years (and I’m not just talking about their hair ‘dos). In his earlier life, Ari was less eccentric and more focused on making his family proud as a young black man in college who isn’t running on BPT for class. Ari was as straight as 180 when he’s first put into a situation where he’s forced to confront his sexual identity. As big and bad as he looked while working as a “rough & tough” bouncer at a nightclub, a flirtatious patron sees right through that persona.  After being charmed by the man who helps him realize self, the rainy night sets the tone for a steamy kiss between the two in the front seat of Ari’s car. The look on Ari’s face is a blend of fear, then relief, then ultimately bliss as he seemingly reminisces on his random but welcomed encounter. Although he enjoyed it, Ari didn’t seem to embrace his identity totally. That same year, we see a less hood-David changing more into the Christian we now know and Ari isn’t buying it. Something about this “we can do all things in Christ mentality” rubs him the wrong way. Facing one’s true self is tough.

Junior year, Bryson has a much better barber but things haven’t changed; he’s still checking for Simone. She and Prisoner are still dating if you want to call it that. Prisoner is the type of dude you’d expect to see Simone date in college. He’s flashy, has money, probably doesn’t even go to the school, and he’s rude AF. As Simone and Bryson reconnect for the two millionth time, Prisoner’s pimp tone telling Simone to hurry up is a strong indication he’s not here for their friendship. In analyzing the hair, it’s clear that Simone is not herself. Seriously, at this point, she’s rocking a glueless lace wig.

With her new hairstyle, she realizes that she made the mistake of loving a man more than herself. Prisoner is officially a dub. To celebrate her revelation, she finds herself drunkenly wining and grinding on her childhood bae, Bryson. Does this look familiar? Well, think back to last week when they were doing the same in the parking lot before 5-0 arrived. Because she couldn’t hold it, Simone ends up using Bryson’s bathroom which leads to a very sober thoughts-type of conversation in the bedroom. It is recognized that Bryson has always had a thing for the kid and Simone regrets that she never said anything about her feelings. His commandeering attitude (like the day she walked into his class freshman year) reminded her of the Different World “Strangers on a Plane” episode. It was an iconic one because it’s where Dwayne and Whitley’s love story began. That’s a telling comparison.

With that being said, Simone always felt Bryson was the Dwane to her Whitley. Unfortunately, the timing was always off and just when we think the two finally catch up to one another, cue: the vomit. Poor Bryson. Did someone do brujeria on this kid? He has the worst luck. But, like the gentleman he is, he takes care of his queen to make sure she’s all comfy in her drunken slumber. He whispers, “I love you Simone Graham,” but on the wake up it looks like sis suffers from sudden amnesia. She pulls the “best friend” card, making it clear that it’s friend zone from here on out. Prisoner’s trifling friend calls to offer to take Simone out to eat and in an act of “let me solidify that Bryson knows this is going nowhere,” Simone agrees to go out with her ex's friend. Once again, a blue-balled Bryson is left sorting out his feelings that Simone continues to perpetually confuse.

It’s important to note that the story of Brymone is not a new one. We’ve seen it in many action movies, comic book flicks, and on “Strangers on a Plane” where the geeky male character is overlooked by the badass female, only to win her affection in the end. Nice guys don’t always finish last, but in Bryson’s case, could it possibly be heading in that direction and is Simone even the heroine worth winning? In browsing through what is essentially the best years of any young adult’s life, Simone had many times to figure out if Bryson was the one for her and yet she chose to ignore her feelings. Unlike David, it’s not like she found Jesus; she hasn’t yet found herself.

One thing she does know is that she cannot lose Bryson because it’s possible she may love and need him more than she’d like to verbally admit. He’s no Prisoner or no flashy member of the entourage. He’s the “gentleman who wears tuxedos and makes sure his homegirl is safe” type of dude and unfortunately, that isn’t one Simone is interested in, for now.

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Alexis Fields To Star In Church Comedy Produced By Kerry Washington

Our favorite actresses from the 90s are coming back bigger than ever. Alexis Fields, known for her work on Moesha, Sister Sister and Kenan & Kel is heading back to the small screen in a church comedy pilot produced by Kerry Washington.

Shadow & Act reported Wednesday (March 12), the untitled series will also star singer-actor Leslie Odom Jr. of Hamilton fame and is based on real-life married progressive pastors Touré Roberts and Sarah Jakes-Roberts. penned by Saladin K. Patterson (The Last O.G., The Big Bang Theory), the comedy  "revolves around Omari and Hope, who are joint pastors at a young, hip, diverse church in Los Angeles. Through their services, online streams and books, they are experts at uniting people across different races, genders, orientations and opinions. But when it comes to uniting the people in their blended family, they are way out of their comfort zone, and as a result, the teachers often find themselves the pupils."

Fields joins as the lead of the show with Odom Jr. Kelly Jenrette from The Handmaid's Tale will also be apart of the series after a three-year hiatus from acting.

Fields took to her Twitter account to express her gratitude. "Humbled....grateful....so honored," she said. "God doesn't give up on us. Any of us."

 

Humbled....grateful....so honored. God doesn’t give up on us. Any of us. ❤️ pic.twitter.com/EaLwRLLiPf

— Alexis Fields (@Alexis_Fields) March 12, 2019

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