VIBE Interview: No Malice Digital Cover Story 'Hear Ye Him'

No Malice knows the easy route. He lived it for most of his life. Following the flock, keeping on his cool, while setting out on a quest for the hip-hop dream. Well, maybe the street dream came first. But after the allure had faded, the physical fulfillment dulled by excess, it was time to look in the mirror. Who did he see? A successful rapper? A celebrity? He couldn’t see anything. Forget the money, the fans and the women. No Malice needed inner peace and it was in front of his face his whole life. When the word of God finally touched his soul, the Clipse half was a changed man forever. His life did a complete 360. Changing his rap moniker was just a small step in his new journey with God. When he realized that nothing else was able to make him feel complete, Pusha’s brother accepted the mission to reach anyone who was willing to listen.

“There was times when I couldn’t have this conversation with an interviewer about God. ‘Are you kidding me? God? I’m a rapper. We ain't talking about God.’ That was me before. But it’s the spirit that takes you and helps you become bolder with God’s word,” says No Malice. “It’s just like physical growth from a baby to a toddler to an adolescent. This is spiritual growth."

The new Malice acts as a servant, not by choice, but by what he says is the grace of his lord and savior. “I have so many friends that call me and tell me testimonies. They feel like I’m the only person they can call and tell,” says No Malice. As a personal messenger for Jesus Christ, he knows there’s a higher calling for his gift of speech. His pyrex has been cleaned for good. You won’t ever find traces of powder again.

VIBE: "Malice is wack now. He doesn’t want to rap hard anymore. He’s corny." How do you react to that statement?
No Malice: I haven’t heard that statement, but everyone is pretty much entitled to his or her opinion. Everybody that feels that way for me, it tells me of their intellect. I don’t think that’s the kind of people that I would engage in an argument or discussion. Everyone is entitled to their opinion.

So, honestly you don’t think that you’ve lost any fans with the new direction of your music?
They really haven’t heard my music yet, for one. You heard a couple singles or whatever, but to say that I haven’t lost any fans I don’t think that would be realistic because it’s a different message. It is definitely a different movement; it’s a different word. So to do something different and expect the same amount of fans, I don’t think that would be logical. I’m sure, you know, some would be lost along the way. And that’s cool.

It doesn’t seem like something you’re concerned about or losing sleep over.
I can’t lose sleep over it. I can’t be concerned or allow that to stop me from what I’m doing.

Do you consider yourself a Christian or Gospel rapper now?
I’m not going to say what it is not. I haven’t labeled this music. I’ll let the fans call it what they want to call it. But for me it’s the truth music. For me it is definitely undeniable. I know Malice can’t hold a candle to No Malice lyrically. He doesn’t even come close. It’s different when you have a message that you’re willing to put in an art form, share with people and die for. It’s a huge difference.

Are you willing to die for this?
Beyond a shadow of a doubt. Make no mistake. Most certainly, most assuredly, Believest thou this, just for the message!

And we’re talking about the message of God, not the music right?
The message. Definitely, the message. For me it’s not about music. Rap is just the vehicle, you know? Rap is just the conduit to reach people who otherwise wouldn’t get the message. I don’t see nothing so great about rap or rappers or what’s going on out there. I mean, okay it’s enjoyable, it feels good, it's a lifestyle. But I think I’m one of the best to do it. Rap? I’m not impressed with it.

Really, there aren't any new rappers that you like?
Nothing! I wasn’t impressed with any! You know I been out of music for the past three, going on four years, and it’s right where it was when I left it. I ain’t seen nothing step up. I ain't seen the bar raised. I ain’t seen nothing good. I ain't seen a great message. I haven’t seen anything different than from when I left.

Do you feel like you’re going to make a big impact with your own solo project, Hear Ye Him?
I feel like my music is going to touch whoever it’s supposed to touch. I’m not going to come back in and be like, "I’m the best! Y’all ain’t doin nothing!" That’s not my intent, not my game plan. There’s definitely a listener for this music. And like I said, the people it's supposed to touch... it will touch.

Well, you’ve really set yourself up for this album, with the book kind of being like a prelude. You hit all the outlets. You did all the interviews. You explained yourself and took your time to set yourself up. By now, everyone knows your music has a new message.
Yeaj, I feel like my gift was given to me from God. I feel like any gift that is used for the wrong kingdom is called talent. And I have my gift no matter what it is I’m talking about. I just choose to talk about things that don’t lead you to a dead end. I tend to talk about things that lead to life. I tend to talk about things that lead to peace and not destruction. And if I’m wrong for that, then I’m going to be wrong.

Who was involved in the making of Hear Ye Him?
I have, of course, Chad Hugo. I have S1, Illmind and a group of guys from Virginia that goes by the name of Profound Sounds who actually did the title cut “Hear Ye Him.” They also did “Bury That” as well. There’s also a young lady here from Virginia named Bri and she’s on a song called “Different.” She’s a young 19-year-old with an incredible voice. John Bibbs, he’s from Richmond, also on “Bury That. “ Cam Calloway. He produced a song called “Blasphemy,” that’s featuring Famlay. I definitely kept the spotlight on Virginia.

CLICK HERE TO READ PAGE 2 OF NO MALICE'S INTERVIEW

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Artist Hebru Brantley Collabs With Bombay Sapphire To Support Black Lives Matter Chicago

The front lines of various movements can be filled with not only the physical presence of people but also the creative spaces that support the way. Visual artist Hebru Brantley is adding to the Black Lives Matter Chicago organization with the help of spirits brand Bombay Sapphire. Brantley, a Chicago native, is world-renowned for his artistry. His images and symbolism of blackness gives colorful scenes of spirited aviation and flash worthy stylishness with his young Fly Boy and Lil Mama characters.

For his link up with the Gin brand, Brantley drew on more universal themes as stated in the press release for the union, it's "an extension of Stir Creativity, the global platform from Bombay Sapphire, the Hebru Brantley Limited Edition embodies the brand’s mission to inspire and awaken the creative potential within everyone." The 750 ML bottle went on sale on July 1st and retails for $26.99. A portion of the proceeds will help BLM Chicago in their efforts against racism.

Brantley spoke to VIBE on the collaboration, raising Black children and his place of inspiration. To purchase the collab bottle click here at Reserve Bar.

VIBE: How did this Bombay collaboration come about? 

Hebru Brantley: It all started with me being a part of the Artisan Series back in the day. I had a very successful Miami Art Week experience as a result, which was a turning point in my career. Since then, the brand has been a big supporter of my various creative ventures, like sponsoring the opening night of Nevermore Park, immersive art experience, and one of my most ambitious projects to date. Meanwhile, Bombay Sapphire approached me about doing a very special project, which was designing their first-ever artist-designed limited-edition bottle. I want it to inspire hope for a better future and shine a light on the courage and resilience of Black people in America. It felt only right that Bombay Sapphire and I were able to do this together to benefit Black Lives Matter Chicago, to support the critical work they do in fighting for racial justice in my hometown.

Despite COVID-19 and the country confronting systemic racial injustices, where you are drawing your inspiration from these days?

I've always drawn inspiration from film, TV, comic books, my culture, and history, so not much has changed there. What feels different is my motivation to get out what I create, there is an even greater sense of urgency for me now then there was before. I am grateful for the opportunity to uplift and inspire and I feel that my message really resonates with people now more than ever.

Speaking of racial injustice, we saw your Harper’s Bazaar editorial and as a father raising Black children, what are some conversations you're having with them that you didn't have growing up?

A lot of the conversations are the same or similar to the ones I had with my parents growing up. The only difference is that I was taught to be aware of racism and certain incidents felt historic. For my kids they're living in a racial justice movement, we are living part of history. The conversations and relevance to those conversations are true and current. They're on TV, on social media for my kids to see and experience firsthand.

Besides Bombay, what other projects are you working on?

I'm working towards a few exhibitions in 2021, brand collaborations, etc. We have some exciting things coming up, so stay tuned.

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DJ Snoopadelic, aka Snoop Dogg, performs at the Rookie of the Year Party during Pepsi Zero Sugar presents Neon Beach at Clevelander at the Clevelander South Beach on January 30, 2020 in Miami Beach, Florida.
Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for Pepsi

Snoop Dogg Is Dropping His Very Own Wine Bottle

Snoop Dogg will soon release his very own wine blend, thanks to his multi-year deal with Australian winery 19 Crimes owned by Treasury Wine Estates. The name of his first bottle? Snoop Cali Red.

"I've been a fan of this wine, and I'm excited to unveil my Snoop Cali Red this summer and share the experience with all my fans," said Snoopzilla in a press release. "It's one of the most successful brands in the market, so I'm more than eager to bring this collaboration to the world!"

TWE marketing vice president John Wardley added: "Snoop embodies the spirit of 19 Crimes – rule-breaking, culture creating and overcoming adversity. We are truly excited to partner with Snoop and welcome him to the 19 Crimes family. Snoop Dogg, an entertainment and California icon, is the perfect partner for 19 Crimes Snoop Cali Red."

The actual bottle's label is set to feature a photo of a hooded Snoop while the actual blend consists of 65% Petite Syrah, 30% Zinfandel, and 5% Merlot. As for how much a bottle will cost? $12 USD. "Snoop Cali Red" hits shelves in Summer 2020 at select wine stores. For more information or to locate a store near you, visit 19crimes.com.

Bonus: Earlier this month, a comedic rendition of Snoop Dogg's "Gin and Juice" made rounds on social media platforms. Watch it below.

 

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A'Lelia Bundles On Netflix's 'Self Made,' Black Hair, And Self-Expression

Netflix looks to answer the Oscars debacle from earlier this year with an exciting new four-part limited series, Self Made: Inspired by the Life of Madam C.J. Walker. Starring Octavia Spencer in the title role, Self Made utilizes the research of Madam Walker’s great-great-granddaughter, A’Lelia Bundles, who wrote a New York Times bestseller about her family’s legacy in Black hair care. A’Lelia, a former network television news executive and award-winning producer for 30 years at NBC and ABC News, authored On Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam C.J. Walker to inform a new generation about the importance of America’s first successful Black entrepreneur.

Madam Walker was the daughter of slaves, and a widow at the age of 20. Seeing a need for healthy hair alternatives that catered to the Black woman, Madam C.J. Walker and her family built a business empire that focused on cosmetic and hair care products for women of color. Many of her company’s employees were women, including Marjorie Joyner (co-founder of the National Council of Negro Women) and Alice Kelly (the first forewoman and manager of the Walker factory). Through hard work and effort, Madam Walker turned her wealth into philanthropy and made friends with “talented tenth” MVPs: W.E.B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington.

A’Lelia Bundles is also the president of the Madam Walker/A’Lelia Walker Family Archives, making her the oracle behind her famous ancestors’ speeches, publications, documents, photographs and past public initiatives. VIBE was fortunate enough to get the engaging public speaker and lover of history to talk about her great-great-grandmother’s impact on the Black entrepreneurial spirit, discovering her own revolutionary acts through her Black hair growth, and shares why she celebrates today’s stars for championing Black self-expression.

VIBE: Self Made: Inspired by the Life of Madam C.J. Walker hits Netflix on March 20, during Women’s History Month. With those events in mind, I wanted to ask you about your involvement with the series and what message do you hope the show can convey to Black audiences?

A’Lelia Bundles: My book, On Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam C.J. Walker was optioned a few years ago by Mark Holder of Wonder Street [Productions]. Mark then approached Warner Bros. and then Netflix about turning it into a series. Once that went through, Octavia Spencer came on board, and we went through the process from then on. I’m considered a consulting producer, which means that I had some script review, but I really hope that what comes from this is that more people will know Madam C.J. Walker’s name, and that their curiosity will be pricked a bit so they’ll want to learn even more about her.

Obviously, with the show being a limited series, you can only scratch the surface of her legacy and impact. Add to that that I’ve done almost 50 years’ worth of research on Madam Walker and her life, and so I am renaming my book into Self Made with Octavia Spencer’s picture on the cover, as well as an audiobook that I just recorded a few weeks ago.

Congratulations.

Thank you!

It is an interesting time in the world of content creation where people of color are able to inform others through the visual medium. Earlier this year, we had Who Killed Malcolm X, and When They See Us in 2019 had a new generation learning about the Central Park Five. You say  Self Made only scratches the surface, but what do you hope people take away from this show when it compares to the rise of the Black haircare industry?

There is a core of people who know and love Madam C.J. Walker, but there’s a much larger audience who don’t really know about her. I think Self Made will give people a window into her life. Octavia Spencer is the right person to play this role. She has an understanding of the obstacles that Black women face and, in her own personal life, she has certainly overcome obstacles and dealt successfully with challenges.

The message I hope people get from this series is that a Black woman in the early 20th century not only started a business, but empowered other women, and went on to become the first self-made Black millionaire. By helping those women become economically independent, she created jobs and generational wealth for thousands within the Black community.

 Switching braids a bit, I wanted to ask you about your own hair care journey. When did you learn that Black hair could be politicized?

I learned that my hair could be politicized when I was a senior in high school. Both my parents worked at the Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company, with my dad eventually being hired by another company called Summit Laboratories that made chemical hair straighteners.

At that time, I’d see Angela Davis and Cicely Tyson with the big afro, plus the Black Power Movement was in full swing. People were getting rid of their processed and straightened hair, which awakened my political consciousness. I knew to have an afro was a sign of rebellion, much like how the white kids were growing their hair long, Black kids like me were using our hair to make a statement against the issues of the time.

 To relate that to what’s going on with today’s youth, I wanted to get your thoughts on the struggles that kids like Deandre Arnold and others experience when trying to express themselves…

Companies like Sundial Brands and people like Matthew Cherry are making a statement by supporting young people while saying to the rest of the world that you will not shame our babies. It’s very hard to be a kid, especially in a predominantly white school or white town where other people want to police your body and hair. It is angering to me that anybody can be expelled from school because of the hair that grows out of their head. Our hair is beautiful the way it grows and the judgments that other people make need to evolve.

 Speaking of evolution, I must ask what your own favorite hairstyles of today are that you’d rock if you could?

I love people who have really long locs. I love how they can go in different directions or pile it up into a big crown on the head. I love just really full hairstyles that have structure. My hair is pretty limp [laughs] and I’m not able to do that, but if I could, I would. At this stage of my life, though, it would take so much work and product and maintenance that I am really all about that easy life.

 How do you feel about media places like Huffington Post’s Black Hair Defined project spotlighting stories about Black hair and the Black hair care industry?

It is really important that places like this make statements that our hair is beautiful and that there’s nothing wrong with our hair. People like Richelieu Dennis, founding CEO of Sundial Brands and now owns Essence Magazine, has created a $100 million VC fund called the New Voices Fund for women entrepreneurs of color. Support from companies and media places like these are uplifting Black hair, hair care, and cosmetic companies that make it plain that we’re not going backward and only are going to continue to express ourselves.

 Last question, Ms. A’Lelia: What is the continuing impact Madam C.J. Walker’s legacy has on Black entrepreneurs?

Her impact is that of a great American rags-to-riches story. I hope that by the time people have finished watching the series, and doing some additional research, that they really see Madam C.J. Walker as a multidimensional woman. She was the first child in her family to be born after slavery, who was a millionaire by the time of her death in 1919 and made a difference in her community as a patron of the Arts and a helper of other women to become economically independent. I think this, her being an impactful inspiration to many, gives hope to others to follow in her footsteps.

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