porsche-911

3 Memorable Anniversary Edition Whips

When a product becomes a certified classic, designers toast with a limited edition. VIBE pedals backward and forward on notable anniversary whips

2003 Volkswagen 20th Anniversary GTi | MSRP (then): $23,225
To celebrate two decades of what many consider the original “Hot Hatch,” VW turned to its fan base for inspiration. Compiling trends from “Dub’ shows worldwide, the 4,000 unit run of this grassroots favorite was mostly cosmetic, but still packed VW’s highly tunable 1.8 Turbo engine. While also pressed in “safer” colorways of black and silver, the available hues of yellow and blue emulated that of the GTi’s four-door bully of a cousin, the Audi S4.

2005 Nissan 350Z 35th Anniversary Edition | MSRP (then): $37,160
Kanye West has dropped the Datsun moniker like it’s an insult when, in fact, the predecessor of today’s Nissan paved the way for one of the most proven workingman’s sports car of all time: the Z platform. Embracing a true “30’s the new 20” attitude, the 35th anniversary 350Z stickered at almost 10G’s above the base model, but boasted a healthy horsepower bump. Also available in a high-demand shade of yellow—which flirted with Ferrari’s color palate—the big-braked, custom wheeled Z was in essence a tuner car that required zero tuning.

2013 Porsche 50th Anniversary 911 | MSRP: $125,050 (Pictured above)
By 50, many a make and model have gone through the mechanical equivalent of a mid-life crisis. Then there’s Porsche, happily enjoying its bout of Benjamin Button syndrome; or at the very least, holding turf like a classic pair of J’s. Celebrating 50 years of the coveted 911, the brand has released a beautiful, bubbly version of its classic, complete with a 430hp flat six that sprints from 0 to 60 in just 3.8 seconds. Embracing a bevy of retro styling cues, the 1,963-unit run (for its inaugural year of 1963) is less your pops pulling out his old disco gear, and more Macklemore stunting better than your daddy.

Photo Credit: netcarshow.com

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Dave J Hogan

Why Would Sada Baby Not Rank Eminem In His Top Five From Detroit?

Eminem is the most prolific and successful rapper of all time. His stats can’t be faded. When it’s all said and done, we’ll be retiring his number in every stadium he’s ever sold out.

With over 100 million records sold worldwide, an Oscar for Best Original Song, 10 No. 1 albums, more than 1 billion streams on Spotify, two top 100, all-time best selling albums, Marshall Bruce Mathers III is the highest selling rapper of all time. His top five status should be firmly cemented.

The respect for Em also extends to the greatest names in hip-hop. In 2012, VIBE compiled a list of the top 40 compliments Eminem has been given from his peers with names stretching from Scarface to Redman to Jay-Z. In a 2008 interview with BBC, Nas says of Em, “He contributes so much lyrically and musically. He’s amazing.” In a 2010 conversation with Hot 97, Kanye West is on record as saying, “Nobody’s gonna be bigger than Eminem.”

So why does it seem like he isn’t getting the respect he deserves in his own city?

In a recent interview with Say Cheese TV, Detroit rapper Sada Baby – when asked if Eminem was a top five rapper – said, “Out of Detroit? Hell naw. You talking about my Detroit?” While the internet took that quote and decided their varying levels of agreement or anger, there was one thing Sada said that stood out.

“My Detroit.”

While that phrase may not mean anything to outsiders, that distinction means the world to Detroiters.

Detroit is a tale of two cities when it comes to rap. Many know iconic producer J Dilla and wordsmiths like eLZhi and Royce Da 5’9”, but the D has a long, legendary history of street rappers who have helped pave the way. That’s a legacy that younger artists such as Icewear Vezzo, Payroll Giovanni of Doughboyz Cashout, Tee Grizzley, and Sada Baby are pushing forward to this day. As a native Metro Detroiter, artist manager, and digital label manager for Soulspazm Records, Eric “Soko” Reynaert sees both sides as equally important. “The different circles carry a lot of importance in encompassing the variety we have to offer. It's all important equally because it's what makes Detroit hip-hop what it is. Detroit's been running the overseas market touring wise for years, Detroit street rap is making noise in the major label market, Danny Brown's a fucking star: it's all good for Detroit hip-hop as a whole.”

The blunt, straightforward approach of Detroit’s street rappers just doesn’t mesh well with Eminem’s style of storytelling and wordplay. Slim Shady’s knack for entendres, stuffing multisyllabic rhyme schemes inside of each bar and floating between different pockets is a dense, complex style that, in Sada Baby’s own admission, most people just don’t get. “Eminem will get to saying some shit [that’s] going over everybody’s head,” Sada shrugged. “I might be able to decipher some of that shit but that nigga’s shit going over everybody head”.

That’s Sada’s Detroit. Among his musical influences are the late, great Detroit street rappers Blade Icewood and Wipeout - both murdered over the beef between their respective crews, Street Lord'z and the Eastside Chedda Boyz. If you truly want to know what a Detroit native lives by, take a listen to the Eastside Chedda Boyz’s “Oh Boy” and Blade Icewood’s “Boy Would You.” The true anthems of the city, both songs deified by their infectious hooks, blunt and deliberate lyrics, and a simplistic yet highly effective message draped in the energy that Detroiters carry with them. They’re not trying to win you over with metaphors and similes, but rather connect to their audience with honesty and directness in their rhyming. Similar styles can be heard in other 313 legends like Big Herk, K Deezy, and even Trick Trick and his Goon Sqwad click that has been active on the city’s music scene since the mid-‘90s. These are the artists that dominated the streets and Detroit radio. Not J Dilla. Not Slum Village. Not Black Milk. Detroit’s lyrical rappers tout immense worldwide respect but have always been relegated to the background in Detroit’s hierarchy, only sniffing radio play by doing jingles for local disc jockeys.

“There’s a street side and a hip-hop side to the music scene in Detroit,” says battle rap pioneer and Detroit MC Marvwon, while explaining the differences amongst the city’s musical landscape. “The funny thing is [that] there’s no difference in level of talent. The only difference is the backdrops.”

Those backdrops are also socioeconomic in nature as Detroit is a city whose residents have been denied basic human necessities. And for the Motor City? There’s no better representation of the city than the music at the most fundamental, street level. As Marv continued to explain, “The division comes from perception. The street cats believe that there hasn’t been an accurate representation of Detroit in the music world.”

Those feelings are echoed throughout the scene. Detroit MC Seven The General traverses through both worlds in a manner that the city hasn’t seen since the late Big Proof (known as Eminem’s close friend, as a member of his group D12). As Seven explains, “When I was incarcerated, we felt that the street aspect of Detroit wasn’t being heard with Eminem. But when I came home in ‘03 and heard Rock Bottom, I realized it was there but it just wasn’t receiving the same attention nationally. It had been held back and secluded to the streets for so long that people felt Eminem didn’t like it or care. It caused a resentment and caused rappers to feel like he doesn’t listen to us so why should we listen to him. It made us ask, ‘Where on the list of Eminem‘s top five Detroit artists would any of us fit?’”

When taking in these factors, it’s easy to see why Eminem doesn’t translate well for Sada Baby. However, Eminem’s impact has transcended not only Detroit but the world. Artists such as Kendrick Lamar, Hopsin, Tyler The Creator, and Juice WRLD are amongst today’s generation of rappers that all list him as a major influence. For better or worse, Em is also a catalyst for today’s druggie rap scene. Street rappers have gone from rapping about selling drugs to today’s scene glorifying the use of Xanax and Percocet - something that Marshall pioneered on his early albums with songs like “Drug Ballad” and “Purple Pills.” And with the blockbuster film 8 Mile and its hit song “Lose Yourself,” Eminem helped take battle rap culture mainstream to unfamiliar audiences.

Thanks to Eminem, Detroit’s street rap and lyrical scenes have crossed over. Somewhere at the intersection of manager/A&R Hex Murda and Big Sean, the worlds collided. As Marv states, “Big Sean, Danny Brown, and anyone else from the city mostly talk about the same things: money, bitches, and bossing up.” For every J Dilla, we now have a Black Milk who can equally rap and produce between both worlds. Where there’s a Dex Osama, there’s a Guilty Simpson and Seven The General whose blunt and brash flows hit you in the chest as hard as their lyrical ability and wordplay.

And don’t get it twisted; Em definitely sees the work that Detroit’s street rappers are putting in. “I have a personal relationship with all of the rappers around him,” Seven says. “I feel he rocks with me and has love for me. If he could see a way for us to make bread together, I feel like he’d pull me in; but D12 is actively in the streets assisting artists. I’ve personally seen what Em does for Detroit like his partnerships with (Metro Detroit sneaker boutique) Burn Rubber and (locally-founded clothing company) Detroit vs Everybody.”

He may not be your flavor but there’s no denying the skill and impact that Em has had on the city of Detroit and the genre as a whole. If Eminem isn’t top five in Detroit, you’re doing it wrong.

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Courtesy of TDE

Meet Zacari: The TDE Singer Whose Missed Path On 'The Voice' Led To Greater Blessings

In April 2017, Zacari left his first mark in the music industry when he appeared on Kendrick Lamar's album, DAMN. He was one of three features on the Grammy Award-winning project, standing next to Rihanna and U2, but his work on “LOVE.” made it a standout song on the album. Prior to 2017, the songbird was known as Zacari Pacaldo, an aspiring singer from Bakersfield, Calif. who has always known what he was destined to be.

His path into the music business, and what eventually led him to Top Dawg Entertainment, started right at home. The 23-year-old was born into a musical family. His mother Ede Pacaldo, a former drummer for rock bands, taught Zacari how to play the guitar, and his father passed down his love of blues and jazz music, which eventually led to the young singer being in a jazz band in high school.

Before he made his way to Los Angeles and underneath the wing of his manager Moosa Tiffith, son of TDE’s Anthony “Top Dawg” Tiffith, Zacari had a stint in Alaska where he worked for the summer after graduating high school. In The Last Frontier state, the musician spent his time in a lodge washing dishes, "but making good money," and most importantly being surrounded by wolves, which he has a storied love for. The musician strolled into VIBE's offices, flanked by a tiny entourage and subtly dripped down with a dangling claw earring, a fire red jacket and his signature curly hair tied up, to talk about his brief time on The Voice, who Zacari the artist truly is, and what to expect from his musical offerings going forward.

 

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@revolve x @fwrd 🔥 #revolvefestival 📸 @starksbxs

A post shared by lonewolf 🌑 (@zacarip) on Apr 14, 2019 at 1:23pm PDT

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VIBE: Where did you get your inspiration for your EP Run Wild, Run Free? Zacari: I lot of it came from real experiences up to this point. Even some lyrics are from high school and some other things. For this first EP, I wanted to make sure that you get to see my experiences and what's left at this point, even going back that far to high school. Even my experiences in Alaska as well, where I worked after high school. It all comes from that, it comes from growing up in the church making music, my parents, and the type of music they listen to as well. My mom was a rockstar. She used to be in bands, she taught me guitar. My dad was big on blues and soul music. I was in a jazz band in high school, so it's all those different elements and genres I was into. And of course hip-hop. My family and me, we've always had love for lots of different genres and different sounds, so it's all my experiences and all the music that's influenced me up until this point.

Did you always know you wanted to do music coming from this background? Yeah, since I was a little kid. There's old videos of me on the news as a little kid doing singing competitions and stuff like that. I even auditioned for The Voice like three times. I made it pretty far. I made it to the point where they review you and then they pick your interview—The singing part's done, now we just want to know if you have a crazy backstory—and I guess my stories were never that exciting.

So your path could have been completely different had you gone The Voice route? Yeah, I'm glad I didn't go to The Voice, but just the fact that I was preparing for it and practicing and going out and seeing what I could do is a big influence. Even playing for my church, that started in the seventh grade where I was leading a band. Seventh grade all the way through high school.

Did attending church influence the type of music you make? Yeah, definitely.  I'm always conscious about what I'm saying and I always want to make sure that I can at least leave the project with a positive outlook on it. I'm always thinking about what my parents would think if they heard the song. My family or my church, it's always kind of in the back of my mind when I'm writing music.

How long were you working on Run Wild, Run Free? This EP we were working on for almost three years, probably. A lot of the songs are two years old and the lyrics go back even further than that. It took three years to find a sound I was confident in. You go back on my old stuff that I still have, I've grown a lot. I was blessed to be in a situation where I could just be in the studio and that's it. I was sleeping on couches and stuff like that. My manager Moosa would help me pay my rent just so that I could stay in the studio, because when I first moved to L.A. I was on my own. I was working two jobs and going to the Musician's Institute. Once I met my manager, he really helped me get in situations where it was like, "f**k everything else, just be in the studio."

You mentioned your sound earlier. How would you describe the type of music you make? Or what kind of genre is it, if you wanted to categorize it? It's hard to categorize it because there's so many different elements that I draw from. R&B is an easy one to go to because that's the best way you could put it, but there's more. There's a lot of folk and indie elements as well. All the guitars in the album, I played. And there are folk parts coming from when I would cover old folk songs and John Mayer stuff. It's more like an experimental or indie R&B. Some of the songs are straight up R&B but on the other side of the EP there's a hip-hop sound like with "Midas Touch," and then "You Can Do Anything" has the guitars and the folk-type style.

 

What do you hope your fans get from this EP? What do you hope they're going to take in from you? I really want it to be like a breath of fresh air. It's a short EP, it's only like 20 minutes long, so before work or after work or when they're stressed, I want them to just play this. Press play, put their phone down and after that I want them to feel ready. I want them to feel refreshed. I want it to be a break, like a vacation almost.

And what should fans expect from Zacari in the future? Definitely a full-length album. We held back on this EP for sure. We almost added stuff and changed things but I have a lot more music in the cut. And also I'm definitely going to start doing more shows. That's one thing I'm focusing on, too. We just got a band so we're transitioning the EP into live versions, so it's fun to be working with a band again like I did back in church. It's a whole other thing of doing live performances. I'm excited, I love performing.

For a full-length album, who would you be interested in collaborating with? Who do you feel fits your vibe? I definitely want to get a verse with SZA. We've been bothering her forever and she's always like "yeah, yeah, yeah." Definitely SZA. I also want to work with [Lil] Uzi [Vert] or [Playboi] Carti. I want to get some sh*t from them. They're leading this new sh*t to me right now. There's a lot of that same genre, or people putting out the same sh*t, but to me it's Uzi and Carti at the top of that. I'd rather listen to them over any of the other people, if that makes sense. If I'm going to be listening to that sh*t, I'm going to the top standard and that's Carti and Uzi. Uzi's crazy, his melodies and his energy is insane. And then Carti's the same way. You can just press play on his sh*t and that sh*t hypes you up for the whole day. "Die Lit" is insane.

 

 

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all these TDE nominations 😭 so happy for everyone. BLACK PANTHER UP FOR ALBUM OF THE YEAR.

A post shared by lonewolf 🌑 (@zacarip) on Dec 7, 2018 at 11:26am PST

SZA's your label mate. What was your journey into Top Dawg Entertainment? It was mainly my manager. My manager Moosa is actually Top's son. He found me and he was managing me for years before he brought me around anyone, which is crazy because I'm the first artist he's actually discovered and brought into TDE. He worked with his dad, he managed [ScHoolboy] Q and he did all that but I was the first artist he started bringing around people. The first person I met was [Ab-]Soul. Me and Soul got along and that was before I met Top or anybody. So I was hanging out with Soul, I knew Zay [Isaiah Rashad] before then. Moosa hit up Q to use the studio while he was on Blank Face tour, so I was working in Q's house a lot. And then when Moosa finally set up a session with Kendrick and Kendrick cut the “LOVE.” record that's when his dad Top was like, "yeah bring him through. We've gotta talk." It was a long process. It wasn't like Moosa had found me and he took me to TDE. It was a long process. It was all organic, though. That was the best part of it. It was never forced. Everybody welcomed me, man. TDE is dope, TDE's really a family. You see it from the outside and you don't know what it is but on the inside all these people really grew up together, it's really tight knit.

Have you learned anything being around other TDE talent like SZA, Kendrick, Soul? Yeah, I've learned a lot and they'll talk to me about anything. It doesn't even have to be on some music sh*t. Q will talk to me about money. I'll go and ask him all kinds of questions about money. It's a crazy thing getting money from having nothing. This year I'm paying taxes for the first time—not the first time, I've had jobs before and paid taxes—but for like three or four years when I was in L.A. not making anything, I didn't have to pay any taxes. That's one thing I'm stressed about is my taxes. I'm happy I just put a lot of sh*t away. And then even talking to Kendrick about patience and stuff like that. That's a big person I talk to about anything, he's always kept it real with me. I can text him and call him and he'll respond to me. And that's the same with any member of TDE.

How'd you meet the right people to get in the music industry? It goes back far but it's really destiny, man. My roommate's cousin when I first moved to L.A. is Originist, who's a member of Soulelection. They went to J. Louis' house with them and that's where me and J. Louis made our first song, that first night I met him. And then me and J. Louis become like best friends so we're making music all the time, we're hanging out. He starts working with Bryson Tiller and I'm driving him to the studio and the house. So I'm chilling, and Bryson's hella cool, he let us all hang out, make music. Then Bryson had left the house studio for a couple of weeks and I remember Isaiah Rashad had come into use the studio with my manager Moosa. And I was playing saxophone too for Zay. Zay was like, "oh yeah you play sax? Play some sh*t on there." My manager Moosa took my phone number as a saxophone player. And I just kept tapping in with them. I played them the music I had with J and the Soulelection stuff and asked him to manage me. And that's how that worked out.

I met Teddy Walton there, too, the other producer. J. Louis and Teddy Walton did most of this EP. We're all really homies, we hang out we make music and I think that's a really important part of the sound, too. We can do a lot of trial and error and build everything from scratch. I met all those dudes at this one house, it's a studio house in the Hills that artists rent out if they're coming to L.A. to stay. It has a house and a studio separate. I met so many people there: my manager, Teddy, photographers, clothing people that we literally all still talk from this house. Producers, Sevn Thomas, Syk Sense. Syk Sense is on my project, too. We literally all went to this house and it's been going up since then.

Has the industry been what you expected it to be? Yeah, kind of, but honestly I got really lucky with my team and my people. We see a lot of the industry sh*t but I don't have to go through a lot of bullsh*t with my team. TDE and all my producers are all my friends so we're a very tight knit group. We're all honest with each other, you know what I mean? You really trust the people. Everybody that I work with I trust. They're really my friends. It's all about meeting the right people and earning trust and building relationships, so we kind of do our own thing. We don't really go through none of the bullsh*t. I haven't. So I'm lucky for that, ‘cause you see people that go through sh*t in the industry, but I'm confident in my sh*t. Everything that I'm doing is supposed to be happening, I'm going with it.

 

 

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Man happy birthday brother 😂 @groovyq

A post shared by lonewolf 🌑 (@zacarip) on Oct 26, 2018 at 3:51pm PDT

You're from Bakersfield., Do you feel that they're proud of you? Hell yeah, man. I love my city, man. I see them all over my social media and stuff. I'm actually trying to do a show out there.

When you go there, is the energy nice? Yeah, ‘cause there's a venue there called Jerry's Pizza and it's like one of the main venues in Bakersfield that I used to go to shows. Whenever I go back to the city a lot of people come up to me in my town and talk to me and it's really dope, because in L.A. people recognize me but in L.A. people are less thirsty to come up to people there. In Bakersfield, it's really dope to be able to talk to people and the fans out there.

You see a lot of artists and they tell you that they're inspired now, so it's the best thing. Because not a lot of music comes out of Bakersfield. Korn came from Bakersfield and some country. It's dope to be one of the first new wave contemporary to come out of Bakersfield. It's dope man, I really love Bakersfield.

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Jesse Lirola

Take Five: The Roots Talk Nipsey Hussle's Leadership And The DNA Of Timeless Music

If it weren’t for oscillating spray fans dispersing cool mist across the dense crowd, the inside of the Heineken House would feel like a sweatbox. While bodies entranced by the boom and bass of old school hip-hop swayed from side to side, mouths rapped along to clever couplets floating along soulful melodies. Cold Heinekens sloshed around and splashed on beat-up shoes down below, but everyone was too busy jumping around to the transition of each song, broad smiles abound, to notice. That’s exactly how The Roots like it.

To say that Coachella Weekend 1 attendees were in for a treat is an understatement. Not only did they get to bask in the sounds of De La Soul during the 30-year celebration of their debut album 3 Feet High & Rising, but they were also able to bookend the experience with a two-hour, body-shaking headlining set by the legendary Roots Crew. “I've been feeling like we have really yet to throw a good dance party set,” Questlove says from his artist trailer with Black Thought looking on, “like a set that just makes people jam out.” Consider that mission accomplished.

After catching a quick breather post-show, both the iconic drummer and storied wordsmith chopped it up about the intended messages of their typically three-hour sets and after the untimely passing of Nipsey Hussle, what it means to be an active leader in one’s community.

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VIBE: During your set, you all went through a medley of songs that people—no matter who they are, where they come from or their age—will say, "this is a great song." What do you think is the DNA of that, and what can musicians now do to make sure that their songs can have a timeless feel like the hits you played today?

Questlove: I think the plan for us now, is—no pun intended—is to return to our roots. In our first five years, our show was heavy on doing hip-hop classics, soul classics, and Roots songs mixed at the same time. We're up to 17 albums now, so we sort of phased that out and just concentrated on our catalogue. But I don't know, lately, I've been feeling like we have really yet to throw a good dance party set, like a set that just makes people jam out. Normally it’s just about the virtuoso acrobatics of what The Roots can do, a lot of soul and that stuff. This is probably our most groove-oriented set that we've done, really paying homage to a lot of original, classic great beats that are the foundation of hip-hop. Important covers of Donald Byrd songs and James Brown songs, Chuck Brown & the Soul Searchers. Going through all the genres, doing go-go and doing all that. For us it was just about turning Heineken House into a two-hour dance party.

Black Thought: I think for emerging artists, the key to creating those timeless classics is to revisit and re-acknowledge the timeless classics. You're into electronic dance music, you're into hip-hop, you're into whatever's the modern take on the culture. You have to revisit the foundations and the songs from which you came. The joints that were sampled, those are the songs that the configuration may evolve or may change, but those elements are always going to stand the test of time. Our foundation initially was to educate the audience. We would always sort of do Hip-Hop 101, and that sort of became a part of the Roots brand. And yeah, I guess we abandoned it for awhile and just focused on a more conceptual set. It was more Roots-oriented, and now this most recent set that we've been doing is back to the Hip-Hop 101. Not even Hip-Hop 101 but just Good Music 101. If you can incorporate at least one or a part of some of those elements of those songs that are tried and true, then you're well on your way.

And there's so much room to play. Like you said, there are so many different genres now that you can't even pull them apart from each other.

BT: Absolutely, the lines have been blurred. And that's something else to consider. You want to be as inclusive as possible with your set without it feeling contrived, you know what I mean? As artists you do a performance that is basically the music that inspires you to do what it is that you do, then it looks and feels and reads a lot more personal. Than if it’s like, "oh this is my new album."

Black Thought, you are a proud and true lyricist. Is there any new school lyricist that you’d like to go toe-to-toe with on wax?

BT: I could go toe-to-toe with anybody, anywhere, on the Planet Earth. But I mean, do I have the desire? I don't know, man. I'm getting so old, you know. I definitely enjoy performing on stage with The Roots. It's when I’m most at home. But I've done lots of the stage and studio collaborations that I've always sort of dreamed of. We've done it. I've been blessed enough to have the opportunity to do that. I mean it's still lots of people that I would like to work with. Rappers? I don't know. I'm down to work with anyone as long as it's an organic collaboration. Anyone that I've ever worked with, it's not like I just meet you or someone throws us together for the sole purpose of coming up with a song that's gonna be a hit. I have to have some sort of relationship, or we had to have interacted on some other sort of level and that's when it feels most natural. But I'm down to work with whoever.

Lastly, Nipsey Hussle’s passing really stirred people into thinking a lot more about action, intention, purpose and what it means to be a leader. What, to you, is leadership, and how do you put leadership in what you do?

QL: It's really insane that it took his death to really make people realize what they can do to better themselves as human beings. I'm really glad he was a brother that definitely put his money where his mouth is and there's nothing pretentious about him, nothing performative woke, because that's also a dangerous thing in 2019—to just preach it and tweet it but not really put it in motion. I feel as though the best thing that can come from this will be the enlightenment. Even if it's just four people affected, the enlightenment of someone realizing they can invest in businesses and property and their neighborhood. That's a start. It's really a shame that it took this to bring that to life, but nevertheless it's been brought to life.

BT: To me I think leadership is activism. It's giving back to your community, it's investing in oneself, and you know women and children. It's giving back when the cameras aren't there. When it's going to be anonymous. When you're not necessarily going to get the credit for what you're doing right away. And I feel like that's the sort of activist that Nipsey was. It's building up and empowering the people around you to be their best selves and not just for the headline or the glory.

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