azealia-banks-atm-jam-video

New Video: Azealia Banks feat. Pharrell – 'ATM Jam'

Azealia Banks' "ATM Jam" video was a long time coming. The Harlem rapper first teased the visuals back in September, promising it'd be "trippyyyy." The song features Pharrell, but Skateboard P stays out of the picture in the Rony Alwin-directed clip. What you do get to see in the "ATM Jam" video is some never-before-seen color chemistry and Banks twerk.

"ATM Jam" is off Banks' long-awaited debut LP, Broke With Expensive Taste, due in 2014. In the meantime, Banks will release a sequel to her Fantasea mixtape titled Fantasea II: The Second Wave.

From the Web

More on Vibe

Catching Up with Koffee

There's still a lot of time left in Summer 2020, but on the last day of July, we declared Koffee's "Lockdown" Boomshots' official 2020 Summer anthem. Produced by Dane "Raygad" Ray from the Unruly camp, the song finds Koffee asking all of the questions everybody in the world is asking themselves right now. What will the future be like "when the quarantine thing done and everybody touch road?" As soon as we heard this tune, we knew it was outta here! (That was way before we saw the video with cameos from Popcaan and Dre Island.) More than just a COVID-era contemplation, "Lockdown" is also a poignant love song that speaks to the challenges of romance during a time of the viral pandemic. As such, it represents a milestone in Koffee's catalog.

At the ripe old age of 20, the youngest Reggae Grammy winner in history has given us her first love song—and without overthinking it one bit, she might just have given us a follow-up to rival her breakthrough smash, "Toast." When you hear Koffee sing "if you love me, you should let me...," it's clear she is in her feelings on this one. Of course, everybody wants to know who this song was inspired by, but all we can say about that is just "cool." In her first interview since "Lockdown" dropped, Koffee tapped in with Boomshots' Reshma B on VIBE's Instagram Live and spoke about the inspiration behind the tune.

--

BOOMSHOTS: So much has happened and obviously, with the lockdown, we haven’t seen each other.

KOFFEE: That’s true.

We haven’t spoken since you won the Grammy so let me start with a big congratulations.

Thank you, thank you, thank you.

You made history there. You’re the first female and the youngest to win a Reggae Grammy, as I’m sure you know.

So I’ve heard, so I’ve heard. (Laughs) Thank you.

How was that experience for you?

It was amazing for me being able to be there and represent Jamaica. Because at the end of the day, I feel like—even to be real nobody knew me at the ceremony. As you know the reggae category and some other categories are separated from like big categories like rap and stuff like that. So we’re not in the big ceremony. But it felt so good going up on the stage and collecting something on behalf of Jamaica, on behalf of reggae. There’s a lot to give thanks for regarding that. It’s good to be able fe spread light and just inspire people.

You know there was a time hip-hop was not getting televised either. 

Yeah, so it’s a journey.

We all know someone who’s lost someone in this pandemic. It’s difficult adjusting to this new normal. How have you been coping with the lockdown?

For me, thankfully, I haven’t been directly affected by the COVID, and I don't’ know anybody who’s been directly affected. But I send my prayers out to those who have been and those who find it difficult during these times whether financially, even emotionally. It’s a very very very hard time and I can tell even out in the streets it shows. Before you had homeless people and beggars but now when you look pon them face it’s so rough. Me know say it tough out there. So me just a try to put that energy—channel it into anything I can, which for me is music. You know I’ve been working on my album.

How did the “Lockdown” song come about?

The song was actually a very spur-of-the-moment song. I had been planning to go into the studio with some musicians, like some guitarists, pianists, drummers, and stuff. And for the time being, that had been kinda stalled because of the whole COVID. So I was supposed to be in the UK actually doing a camp. And I was just going to the studio—you know Popcaan?

Of course, we know Poppy. Shout out to the Unruly Boss!

Sorry, my bad... I take it back! I take it back! Poppy has a studio, right? So I started goin’ by his studio to just record some stuff like in the meantime while everything is kinda shut down. And there I met a producer named Dane Ray. Now Poppy have a song weh him release the other day, I think it name “Numbers Don’t Lie” and him say, “More gal fe me and Dane Ray.” You get me? So you know say Dane Ray is like him bredren and stuff. So me set a link there and Dane Ray play me a track, which was “Lockdown” instrumental. And me just decide inna the moment, say, ‘Yo, let’s just write some lyrics to it. Some nice melodies that I’m feeling.’ And I literally just did it. And then probably like the week after that I just listen to the song and said “I really like this.” And me just call my manager like, “Yo, let’s do a video. This is who I want in it. Boom, boom, boom, boom, boom.” We call producer, call everybody, call videographer, and we just got it done and then we just release it. It was so—we didn’t even think twice. Me never think it woulda reach this far.

Everything went natural. 

Yeah, just so natural.

And now you're hot like thermos!

It’s so crazy right now.

This is the first time we've heard a love song from Koffee. I hear you say things like, “Givin’ you my heart beg you take it from me.” It’s so touching to hear that!

Yo, that was so serious. I swear. Me nah go answer no question about who and the speculations. But I’m tellin’ you that song was so real, I meant that sh*t. (Laughs) I mean that!

Watch the full interview above.

Continue Reading
Isaac Brekken/Getty Images for iHeartMedia

Listen To Logic’s Final Album ‘No Pressure’

Logic dropped his final album before he retires from the rap game. No Pressure, the heavily anticipated sixth studio LP from the Maryland native, dropped on Friday (July 24).

The album, executive produced by No ID, is a followup to Logic's 2014 major label debut release, Under Pressure (also produced by NO ID).

Last week, Logic announced that No Pressure would be his last album. “It’s been a great decade,” he revealed last Thursday (July 16). “Now it's time for me to be a great father.”

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Officially announcing my retirement with the release of “No Pressure” executive produced by No I.D. July 24th... It’s been a great decade. Now it’s time to be a great father. Art by @samspratt

A post shared by Logic (@logic) on Jul 16, 2020 at 4:22pm PDT

The following day, Logic debuted photos of his son, “Little Bobby,”  and wife Brittney Noell. “Privacy with family is something that is very important to me,” wrote the proud father. “However my fans have been my family since this all started so I wanted to share with you a glimpse into the life I am now diving into head first. I would like you to meet LB as we call him, Little Bobby. And my beautiful wife Brittney who is an incredible mother.

“These two make me the happiest man in the world and it’s a happiness nothing else has ever been able to fulfill.” he added that the motive behind his retirement is to not only focus more on family but his fans. “Without the stress of this industry we can communicate more. Interact more, and I’m so excited for that. I love you and thank you so so much for being here with me all these years.”

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Privacy with family is something that is very important to me me. However my fans have been my family since this all started so I wanted to share with you a glimpse into the life I am now diving into head first. I would like you to meet LB as we call him, Little Bobby. And my beautiful wife Brittney who is an incredible mother. These two make me the happiest man in the world and it’s a happiness nothing else has ever been able to fulfill. I know the news of retirement may be bittersweet when understanding the motives behind it. But worry not dear listener. I will still be here for you. This will now if anything only allow me to focus more on not only my family. But YOU! My family reading this. Without the stress of this industry we can communicate more. Interact more, and I’m so excited for that. I love you and thank you so so much for being here with me all these years. Now let’s all kick back, love life and enjoy each day having fun... No Pressure RattPack for infinity! And all always... Peace, Love and Positivity! Obediently Yours, Bobby

A post shared by Logic (@logic) on Jul 17, 2020 at 12:24pm PDT

To celebrate the new album, Logic hosted a virtual “release party extravaganza” with his fans.

Stream No Pressure below.

Continue Reading
Photos by Prince Williams/John Parra/Getty Images

A Look At DMX And Snoop Dogg's 'Verzuz' Battle Scorecard

As Verzuz continues to evolve and progress as a platform and brand, the battles have only gotten better and more competitive, with Snoop Dogg and DMX's celebration being the latest pairing to captivate the culture. Both making their debut during the ‘90s, Snoop was the first to crashland on the scene. Parlaying standout guest appearances alongside Dr. Dre on “Deep Cover” and The Chronic into a deafening buzz surrounding his name and debut album, Doggystyle. From there, Snoop has built a legacy as one of the greatest rap artists of all-time, reinventing himself in effortless fashion while continuously dropping hits that touch various generations of music fans, of all genres. With seventeen solo studio albums, as well as multiple collaborative and group projects to his name, Snoop Dogg is revered as a cultural treasure and hip-hop’s resident Doggfather. As one of the more formidable lyricists in rap with an onslaught of show-stealing guest appearances, DMX took the world by storm upon the release of his debut album, It’s Dark and Hell Is Hot, which sold upwards of four million copies and singlehandedly shifted the landscape of rap music. The first artist to release two chart-topping solo studio albums in the same calendar year, the Yonkers, NY native broke multiple records and is equally revered for his passion and spirit as he is for his music.

Given both artist’s affinity for canines and their stature as legends from opposite coasts, it was only right that Snoop and DMX face-off in a Verzuz “battle” to determine who’s really the top dog in this thing of ours. As a mix of classic records were spun by DJ Battlecat, Snoop Dogg arrived on the set first, decked out in a Doggystyle t-shirt, with DPG sweatpants to match. Not long after, he was joined by DMX, who rocked a red and black velour suit; he looked invigorated and as primed for a comeback as ever. As Snoop grabbed a few chicken strips to help sop up his liquor, DMX sipped on his Kool-aid and shared Now & Laters with his opponent, proving that some dogs are able to play nice, even in the heat of battle. Streamed from Snoop Dogg's home, this week’s Verzuz was as anticipated as any we can remember, as Snoop and DMX were both considered the biggest stars in rap at one point in time with catalogs that have given the culture countless hits and timeless records. The proceedings, which begin with a prayer by DMX, were set into motion, as Snoop Dogg took home-field advantage with the first salvo before positions reversed following the first ten rounds. Let the battle of the dogs begin.

ROUND 1: Dr. Dre’s "Deep Cover (feat. Snoop Dogg) vs. DMX’s "Intro"

For his first salvo, Snoop Dogg harkens back to where it all began: "Deep Cover," his inaugural guest appearance alongside Dr. Dre, which put him on the trajectory of stardom in 1992. DMX comes a bit from left field, launching into an acapella performance that provides the buildup for the intro to his blockbuster 1998 debut, It's Dark and Hell Is Hot. While "Intro" is an explosive offering, it is no match for the sheer impact of "Deep Cover," giving Snoop the first round

WINNER: Snoop Dogg

ROUND 2: Snoop Dogg’s "Who Am I (What's My Name)?" vs. DMX’s "What's My Name"

We’re reminded Styles make fights during the second round of this match-up of the dogs. Snoop Dogg continues to draw from his early catalog with his debut solo single, "Who Am I (What's My Name)?", while DMX answers the bell with his own "What's My Name," resulting in a dead heat.

WINNER: Tie

ROUND 3: Snoop Dogg’s "Gin & Juice" vs. DMX’s "Get At Me Dog" (feat. Sheek Louch)

Doggystyle continues to get mined for material, as Snoop Dogg cues up his 1993 single, "Gin & Juice," one of his most seismic bangers. DMX, on the other hand, follows suit, drawing from his own monstrous debut album and firing back with his 1998 release, "Get At Me Dog.” This selection also brings about the origin of the record, which DMX reveals was inspired by an exchange with Snoop prior to the record’s creation. “The ‘Get At Me’ phrase, I got that from you,” X tells Snoop. This historical tidbit gives further insight into their relationship and is another sign that the pitbull and the Doberman are in for a dogfight of epic proportions.

WINNER: Tie

ROUND 4: Dr. Dre’s "Dre Day" (feat. Snoop Dogg) vs. Ruff Ryders’ "Some X Sh*t" (feat. DMX)

Before taking the time to send a shout-out to the chat, Snoop Dogg tosses "Dre Day," him and Dr. Dre's lyrical tirade against the late Eazy-E and Uncle Luke, on the table. At this point, DMX misplays his hand, opting for a Ruff Ryders compilation joint that pales in comparison

WINNER: Snoop Dogg

ROUND 5: 2Pac’s "2 of Amerikaz Most Wanted" (feat. Snoop Dogg) vs. DMX’s "Stop Being Greedy"

Snoop Dogg summons the spirit of 2Pac, whom he collaborated with on

“2 of Amerikaz Most Wanted," from the latter's 1996 release, All Eyez On Me, bringing an air of nostalgia to the proceedings. DMX, who circles the block with "Stop Being Greedy," puts forth one of his most bruising bangers, but Snoop's sole collaboration with Pac gets the win, albeit by a slim margin

WINNER: Snoop Dogg

ROUND 6: Snoop Dogg’s "Down 4 My Ni**az" (feat. C-Murder & Mr. Magic) vs. JAY-Z’s "Money, Cash, Hoes" (feat. DMX)

With the momentum fully in his favor, Snoop pulls out a big joker early, as his raucous No Limit banger "Down 4 My Ni**az" puts even more pressure on his opponent. However, DMX doesn't wilt, bringing in "Money, Cash, Hoes," his monstrous collaboration with JAY-Z, ending this round in a dead heat.

WINNER: Tie

ROUND 7: Snoop Dogg’s "Ain't No Fun (If the Homies Can’t Have None)" (feat. Warren G, Nate Dogg & Kurupt) vs. Aaliyah’s "Come Back In One Piece" (feat. DMX)

The tempo shifts, as Snoop Dogg serves up one of his more syrupy ditties, "Ain't No Fun (If the Homies Can’t Have None)," a posse-cut of the highest order. Following suit, DMX comes through with the 1999 Aaliyah collab, "Come Back In One Piece," which is an admirable selection, but not strong enough to take this round away from Snoop, who shares his affinity for X’s bars on “What These Bitches Want.” In turn, X pays his respects for Snoop’s historic run as part of Death Row Records and gaining a respect for the west coast rap scene from afar.

WINNER: Snoop Dogg

ROUND 8: Snoop Dogg’s "Bi**h Please" (feat. Xzibit & Nate Dogg) vs. DMX’s "X Gon' Give It to Ya"

As the celebration of legends continues, Snoop Dogg looks back at his stint on No Limit Records once again with "Bi**h Please," from his No Limit Top Dogg album. X gets real festive with amped-up soundtrack selection "X Gon' Give It to Ya," which still retains replay value and Snoop remarks is one of his personal favorites out of his catalog. However, it is no match when pitted against Snoop's flow over this particular Dre beat.

WINNER: Snoop Dogg

ROUND 9: Snoop Dogg’s "Gz and Hustlas" vs. DMX’s "Who We Be"

Giving a brief backstory of Bow Wow's origins in the game, Snoop goes back to the Doggystyle well with "Gz and Hustlas," one of the few deep cuts played during the battle. Striking while the iron's hot, DMX manages to steal a round with his 2001 single, "Who We Be," one of the dog's more underrated anthems.

WINNER: DMX

ROUND 10: Snoop Dogg’s "Tha Shiznit" vs. DMX’s "Let's Get It On"

Sticking to the script, Snoop Dogg, who gets inspired to delve into his lyrical grab-bag, pulls another classic from the vault, with "Tha Shiznit," a melodic groove that showcases Snoop's sinewy flow. Smelling blood in the water, DMX throws a haymaker with Swizz Beatz-assisted party banger, "Let's Get It On," stealing yet another round and keeping the competitive juices flowing.

WINNER: DMX

ROUND 11: DMX’s "F**kin' wit' D" vs. Snoop Dogg’s "Lay Low" (feat. Tha Eastsidaz, Master P, Butch Cassidy & Nate Dogg)

As the order reverses for the second half of the battle, with DMX now going first, he gives insight into the making of It's Dark and Hell Is Hot, revealing he wrote three songs within hours of each other, one of them being the It's Dark and Hell Is Hot cut "F**kin' wit' D," a high-octane thumper that channels the Dark Man's energy. For a change of pace, Snoop Dogg slows down the tempo with "Lay Low," one of his more infectious salvos from his No Limit tenure.

WINNER: Snoop Dogg

ROUND 12: DMX’s "What These Bi**hes Want" (feat. Sisqo) vs. Snoop Dogg’s "Beautiful" (feat. Pharrell Williams)

DMX goes for the jugular with"What These Bi**hes Want," a timeless gem, which recently inspired a social media challenge that took the world by storm. Snoop Dogg, who keeps the same energy, doling out "Beautiful," his collaborative effort with Pharrell Williams, which he recalls being inspired by a trip to Brazil. “I got with my nigga Pharrell, and he was like, ‘Snoop, you gotta tap into your sexy side,’” the Doggfather explains. In spite of that intel, “Beautiful,”’ which may have been a bigger hit, lacks the punch of "What These Bi**hes Want"

WINNER: DMX

ROUND 13: DMX’s "How's It Goin' Down" (feat. Faith Evans) vs. Snoop Dogg’s "Pump Pump"

Finally hitting his stride, DMX brings forth one of his more romantic numbers with the Faith Evans-assisted heater "How's It Goin' Down," while Snoop Dogg misfires with "Pump Pump," another selection from Doggystyle. "Pump Pump" is sure to get a positive reaction whenever it's played, but "How's It Goin Down" gets the nod in this round.

WINNER: DMX

ROUND 14: DMX’s "It's All Good" vs. Dr. Dre’s "Bi**hes Ain't Sh*t" (feat. Tha Dogg Pound, Jewell & Snoop Dogg)

Dogs will be dogs, which is evidenced by this round, as both artists play both sides of the coin when it comes to women. DMX's "It's All Good" is more of a celebratory anthem dedicated to the ladies. “When you’re a New York nigga, the entire state of California is L.A.,” X shares. “I actually think I did record this out here, for my second album.” Snoop's appearance on "Bi**hes Ain't Sh*t," throws the scandalous ones under the bus and happens to be one of DMX’s favorite anthems in times of marital strife. Both have their place, but Snoop ultimately gets thrown a bone, winning one of the more crucial rounds of the battle.

WINNER: Snoop Dogg

ROUND 15: DMX’s "Slippin" vs. Snoop Dogg’s "Murder Was the Case"

After taking it to the streets, the party, and the bedroom, DMX and Snoop provide a moment of introspection, as both go with their most personal records to date. DMX, who plays "Slippin'," shifts the vibe of the proceedings, even tacking on an unreleased verse for good measure. This leaves Snoop Dogg no choice but to retort with "Murder Was the Case," resulting in one of the more sobering moments of the night.

WINNER: Tie

ROUND 16: DMX’s "Ni**az Started Something" (feat. The LOX & Ma$e) vs. Snoop Dogg’s "Doggy Dogg World" (feat. Nanci Fletcher, The Dramatics & Tha Dogg Pound)

One of the kings of the posse-cut, DMX comes with one from his own debut, which boasts one of his more impressive rhyme spills to date. Instead of trying to one-up DMX with a harder record, Snoop plays to his strengths, cueing up "Doggy Dogg World," further evidence of how loaded Doggystyle is as a body of work, but not enough to net him the win.

WINNER: DMX

ROUND 17: LL Cool J’s "4,3,2,1" (feat. DMX, Canibus, Redman and Method Man) vs. Snoop Dogg’s "I Luv It" (feat. The Eastsidaz)

Realizing he's hit his stride, DMX continues to delve into his laundry list of collaborative cuts, as he looks to do further damage with "4,3,2,1," on which he co-stars alongside four of the strongest pens of his error. On the other hand, Snoop makes his most egregious blunder of the night, playing "I Luv It," a collaboration with The Eastsidaz that may bang in smaller circles, but failed to move the crowd in a big way.

WINNER: DMX

ROUND 18: The LOX’s "Money, Power, & Respect" (feat. DMX and Lil' Kim) vs. 50 Cent’s "P.I.M.P.: (Remix)" feat. Snoop Dogg & Bishop Don ‘Magic’ Juan

WINNER: DMX

ROUND 19: DMX’s "Ruff Ryders Anthem" vs. Dr. Dre’s "Nuthin' But a G Thang" (feat. Snoop Dogg)

As the end of the regulation draws near, DMX gives us the moment we've all been waiting for: "Ruff Ryders' Anthem," the song that helped launch him into stardom. Not to be outclassed, Snoop also finished in riveting fashion with "Nuthin' But a G Thang," which boasts the introductory verse that will be spat verbatim until the end of time upon pressing play.

WINNER: Tie

ROUND 20: DMX's "Party Up (Up in Here)" vs. Snoop Dogg’s "Drop It Like It's Hot" (feat. Pharrell Williams)

To end their face-off, DMX and Snoop each deliver one of their signature records, as DMX runs with "Party Up (Up in Here)," while Snoop comes with "Drop It Like It's Hot," both of which are undeniable bangers and regarded as cultural classics in their own right.

WINNER: Tie

While many believed Snoop Dogg had a clear advantage in terms of longevity, hits, and overall discography, DMX managed to level the playing field through timely song choices, often offsetting the vibe and tempo of the rounds. Snoop, who got off to an early lead that looked insurmountable by the end of the first half of the battle, had plenty of firepower to work with, but failed to capitalize on his breadth of material due to questionable song placement in certain rounds. However, after taking every individual round into account, this Verzuz event shaped up to be the most competitive thus far, with both artists giving strong performances and ending the battle in a dead heat. As the vibes were all on a high note, the two icons even threw in a few extra joints for good measure, with X performing his 2003 hit “Where The Hood At,” while Snoop responds with his 2000 guest spot on Dr. Dre’s “Next Episode.” The two then dive into an impromptu freestyle session, with both artists wowing the viewers at home and those in the chat. When all was said and done, according to our scorecard, there was no clear-cut victor. That said, the ultimate winners were the culture and hip-hop fans who were able to witness two music icons celebrate each other and play records that helped shape the sound of music as we know it today.

FINAL SCORE: 7-7-6

Continue Reading

Top Stories