Afrojack: EDM Is The New 9 to 5

"I don’t want to go home again after my gigs," says the Dutch DJ, born Nick Van De Wall, of his late night stints. "When I’m finished DJing, like 9 out of 10 times there’s no after party. Usually I play till closing then, after, I'm like, 'Yeah, can I play somewhere else? We’re not finished yet.' There’s so much to exchange: passion, energy, love, you know, music. Let’s go!"

The Dutch demi-lord's bedtime is most people's wakeup call. By the time Afrojack's thinking about sleep, it's roughly the same hour when others are just getting up. Not that it bothers him. In fact, Van De Wall lives for the night.

"I’m like 0.001 percent of the world that gets to work a night job," he says. "I’m really blessed to be in this position, but the main world still works from 9-5. The only thing that I do think is that this can change. Like the reason that EDM and parties and night life go together is because it’s a party; you had a hard day at work, you’re going to go for a party, drink with your friends, listen to your favorite music. That’s what we do now, just have fun."

The superstar producer and DJ isn't alone. With dance music taking over the world, more and more people are becoming night owls and its for good reason.

"My show is not a show, my show is a party, " he says. "It has to be a party. That’s what I do, I make the party. I don’t want people to come to my show, and say, 'Wow, it was a great show." What Afrojack wants is for people to keep wanting more. "Because that’s the way I felt then I went to the club the first time," he adds, "and I want people to feel the same way when they go to my show. It doesn’t have to be the best party in the world, but the best party me and them can make together. And when we do that, I’m happy."

If you're hungry after an Afrojack show pick up Jack in the Box's late night Munchie Meal served daily during the new 9 to 5 -- 9PM to 5AM in the morning.

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