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Keep on Deepin' On: The 40 Best Deep House Tracks of All Time

Blood (and Tears) on the Dance Floor
by SPIN Staff

Way back in the mid-1980s, when the disco gods appeared over the Chicago skyline and proclaimed, "Let there be house," his acolytes responded, "And let it be deep." And it was good.

Slower, moodier, and more sensual than most other club-music forms — heir to disco at its most mirrorball-blissful — deep house has survived for nearly three decades, staying mostly out of the spotlight, consigned to warm-up sets and after-hours reveries. But lately, it has bubbled back to the surface.

This month, the soulful sound scored a No. 1 hit on the U.K. pop charts with Storm Queen's "Look Right Through," a '90s-flavored song by Metro Area's Morgan Geist and busker extraordinaire Damon C. Scott that was first released on Geist's Environ label in 2010. It was a more recent remix from '90s deep-house mainstay MK (Marc Kinchen), and a summer's worth of heavy club play, that finally pushed it to the top slot, on the back of MK's recent success with remixes for Lana Del Rey, Sky Ferreira, and Disclosure.

"Look Right Through" wasn't a fluke. Duke Dumont's "Need U (100%)," another U.K. No. 1, has logged more than 17 million plays on YouTube; its plunging bass line and sub-aquatic keyboard stabs are direct descendants of Kerri Chandler's deep-diving take on New Jersey garage. Disclosure, the year's biggest dance-pop crossover success story, draw heavily from the deep-house playbook in their lanky grooves and woozy atmospheres. Behind them, there's a veritable groundswell of deep-house revivalists: Jamie Jones, Maya Jane Coles, Breach, Dixon and the Innervisions crew, Axel Boman, Hot Since 82 — even Bloc Party's Kele Okereke has plunged into the full-fathom sound.

In fact, 21 of Beatport's current Top 100 tracks are tagged as deep house. That doesn't make it the most popular genre on the site, but after big-room electro house, it's tied for second place with progressive house, and boasts a stronger chart presence than tech house (14 tracks), house (12), indie dance (four), and techno and trance (two apiece). Remember dubstep? That particular wub-genre doesn't have a single song in the Top 100.

A few years ago, that would have been unthinkable; deep house's moody pulses were drowned out in a cacophony of lasers and jackhammers and drops. But deep house's deliberately low profile is beginning to bear out the old meek-will-inherit-the-earth maxim.

Why now? In part, it's a reaction to the ubiquity of EDM at its most garish and bottle-serviced. Warm, moody, sometimes hesitant, and often melancholic, deep house is the antithesis of mainstream EDM's harder/faster/stronger ethos, that capitalist ego-topia fueled by cheap presets and dodgy Molly, hell-bent on success. Deep house is contradictory, wracked with doubt, so full of blue notes it bleeds indigo. It's pro-sadness on the dance floor; pro-pathos in the mix.

Ironically, the success of deep house as an alternative to big-tent EDM has helped it creep towards the mainstream. Pete Tong's "Essential New Tune" selections increasingly lean toward deep house breakout stars like Jamie Jones and Richy Ahmet, while the rest of his show favors crossover cornballs like Afrojack and Avicii; even trance grandmaster Tiësto now has a weekly deep house radio show on Sirius XM.

We'll be the first to admit that some of the attention has been misplaced. A lot of what gets flogged as deep house right now isn't really worthy of the name; it's mid-tempo, pop-dance fare with a 2-step twist, or it's snoozy, monotone background music tailor-made for SEO plays on YouTube channels emblazoned with soft-lit hipster cheesecake. In fact, "deep house" itself is a retrospective term; in their heyday, many of the first songs in the canon were simply considered "house," full stop. It was only later that a style assembled itself around the template those originators had set.

So what classifies as deep house today? Some basic guidelines: The four-to-the-floor pulse is imbued with a suggestive bit of shuffle and swing, with accents on the two and four. The grooves are more restrained than techno's, leaning back rather than barreling forward. The tempo generally runs between 118 and 125 beats per minute, although there are many outliers. More than anything, deep house is rich in harmony and atmosphere, buoyant as a jellyfish, bursting with lush textures and phosphorescent tones. Taking the definition of deep house at its most elastic, we've selected 40 songs that trace its evolution across 27 years, one inky chord at a time. PHILIP SHERBURNE

HEAD TO SPIN TO CONTINUE READING THE LIST

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The study was made in tandem with the University of Missouri, Kansas City and presents ways that HIV can change into other strains. However, according to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ director, said while this is a major discovery there’s no need for alarm.

“There’s no reason to panic or even to worry about it a little bit. Not a lot of people are infected with this," he said. "This is an outlier.” The World Health Organization states HIV’s global population includes 36.7 million people. On the subject of this latest strain discovery, medical officials are unsure as to how it can affect a person’s body but medication can still help to treat it as it does various HIV strains. It'll also remix how doctors test for the medical condition.

In 2017, the Center for Disease Control (CDC), published a study noting that Blacks/African Americans accounted for 43 percent (16,694) of new HIV diagnoses which stood at 38,739 during that year. Within the Group M section (which is one of four groups within the HIV-1 disease), there are nine strains: A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, and K. In the United States, the B strain is the most common leading scientists and researchers to put most of their efforts behind it. Globally, the C strain is the most prevalent.

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Rapper Lil Reese In Critical Condition After Being Shot In The Neck

Chicago rapper Lil Reese is in critical condition after being shot, according to multiple local reports.

ABC7 Chicago and WGN9 report Lil Reese, whose real name is Tavares Taylor, is in the hospital and listed in critical condition after suffering a gunshot wound in the neck Monday afternoon (Nov. 11) at an intersection in the south suburbs of Chicago.

Police told the outlets they found blood in the driver's seat and on the ground next to the car, adding that a man had already taken Taylor to a local hospital before they arrived on the scene. Reese was then transferred to Advocate Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn, Illinois.

Shortly after stories about the incident started bubbling on the web, fellow Chicago rapper Lil Durk took to Twitter to share Reese's health status. "Reese good," he tweeted followed by a blue heart emoji.

Reese good

— DURKIOOO (@lildurk) November 12, 2019

Lil Reese is first known for being featured on Chief Keef's 2012 single "I Don't Like," which reached no. 73 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart. Later that year, Reese recorded a remix of his song "Us" with Rick Ross and Drake.

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Tyler, The Creator Reacts To Drake Getting Booed At Camp Flog Gnaw

Tyler, the Creator is speaking up about Drake receiving boos at the 2019 Camp Flog Gnaw Festival. The former Odd Future member took to his Twitter account to share his thoughts on the incident and address the reports of the Toronto native making an early departure from the event''s stage.

"I thought bringing one of the biggest [sic] artists on the f**king planet to a music festival was fire!" he exclaimed in all caps in a tweet on Monday afternoon (Nov. 11). "But flipside, a lil tone deaf knowing the specific crowd it drew. Some created a narrative in their head and acted out like a**holes when it didn't come true and I don't f**k with that."

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Tyler went on to add a positive perspective to the whole incident and tweeted, "But hey man sh*t happens, all jokes aside, sh*t lowkey funny HAHAHA" he added. "Aside from that, hope everyone had a good time. Again, no [sic] arrests. No bullsh*t, man. A lot of people enjoyed it, thanks again!"

Read Tyler's tweets below and continue here to read about YG bringing out Stormy Daniels during his Camp Flog Gnaw performance of "FDT (F**k Donald Trump)."

I THOUGHT BRINGING ONE OF THE BIGGEST ARTIST ON THE FUCKING PLANET TO A MUSIC FESTIVAL WAS FIRE! BUT FLIPSIDE, A LIL TONE DEAF KNOWING THE SPECIFIC CROWD IT DREW. SOME CREATED A NARRATIVE IN THEIR HEAD AND ACTED OUT LIKE ASSHOLES WHEN IT DIDNT COME TRUE AND I DONT FUCK WITH THAT

— Tyler, The Creator (@tylerthecreator) November 11, 2019

THIS NIGGA DID FEEL NO WAYS! SONG IS BEAUTIFUL. ALSO, MOSTLY EVERYONE WAS HAVING A GREAT TIME, THOSE SHITS IN THE FRONT AREA WERE THE ONES BEING MAD RUDE, WHICH, I CAN SEE WHY, BUT, NAH, FUCK THAT, YALL REPRESENTED ME AND FLOG TO MY GUEST AND MADE US LOOK SOOO ENTITLED AND TRASH

— Tyler, The Creator (@tylerthecreator) November 11, 2019

THAT SHIT WAS LIKE MOB MENTALITY AND CANCEL CULTURE IN REAL LIFE AND I THINK THAT SHIT IS FUCKING TRASH

— Tyler, The Creator (@tylerthecreator) November 11, 2019

NIGGA DID FEEL NO WAYS! THAT SONG IS BEAUTIFUL! MOST GUYS DONT DO ALBUM CUTS! THANK YOU AUBREY!

— Tyler, The Creator (@tylerthecreator) November 11, 2019

LIKE, I LOVE THAT SONG AND THOUGHT THAT WOULD NEVER HAPPEN.......HE REALLY DID THAT FOR ME AND I APPRECIATE IT BECAUSE HE DID NOT HAVE TO COME AT ALL, SEE OUR WORLDS COME TOGETHER WAS SO GREAT IN THEORY

— Tyler, The Creator (@tylerthecreator) November 11, 2019

LIKE, I LOVE THAT SONG AND THOUGHT THAT WOULD NEVER HAPPEN.......HE REALLY DID THAT FOR ME AND I APPRECIATE IT BECAUSE HE DID NOT HAVE TO COME AT ALL, SEE OUR WORLDS COME TOGETHER WAS SO GREAT IN THEORY

— Tyler, The Creator (@tylerthecreator) November 11, 2019

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