Trey Songz 'Trigga' album cover Trey Songz 'Trigga' album cover

New Music: Trey Songz 'What's Best For You'

In the wake of cuffing season comes a perfect break-up anthem courtesy of Trey Songz. On “What’s Best For You”, he butters up the pros of parting ways from his girl, singing, "I only want what’s best for you/ It’s not what’s good for me/ It’s not about what I want/ But it’s all about what you need.” The song will serve as a pre-order bonus for the new album Trigga, due July 1.

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SZA And Justin Timberlake Bring Love To The Dance Floor With New Single "The Other Side"

Justin Timberlake and SZA have joined forces "The Other Side," a celebratory track aligned with the upcoming Trolls World Tour film.

Released Tuesday (Feb. 26) the track is a marriage of 70s funk and 90s music video imagery as the two take cues from greats like Donna Summer and Hype Williams. Produced by Grammy-winning producer Ludwig Göransson and Timberlake, the track is the perfect feel-good jam for a brooding winter.

“I was so thrilled to be invited to participate in this project with Justin,” said SZA in a press release. “The creative process of working with him and the team was filled with such excitement. It’s an energy you can feel in both the song and music video. I can’t wait for people to check it out.”

SZA breaks out plenty of alluring dance moves, top-notch vocals and classic disco looks that would make her a viable candidate for the Parliament. "The Other Side" is the first single to be released from the upcoming Trolls World Tour (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack), which will be available on March 13th via RCA Records and is available for pre-order here now. Timberlake previously worked with the franchise to deliver the Grammy-winning single, "Can't Stop The Feeling!" in 2017.

The full video also premiered on MTV Live, MTV U and BET Soul as well as on ViacomCBS’s Time Square billboards in New York City.

“It has been such a fun process writing and executive producing for this project,” said Timberlake about the soundtrack which also includes Kelly Clarkson, Anderson .Paak, Mary J. Blige, Anna Kendrick, George Clinton, Dierks Bentley and Anthony Ramos.

“Being able to bring together different creatives from various disciplines and genres has been the most rewarding part. Creating something that serves the movie while still being able to exist apart from it has been a fun challenge that was made even more exciting by working with the other amazing artists that helped us put this together.”

Trolls World Tour will hit theaters April 17. Check out the video and tracklist below.

Trolls World Tour (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) Track List

1. The Other Side – SZA & Justin Timberlake

2. Trolls Wanna Have Good Times – Anna Kendrick, Justin Timberlake, James Corden, Ester Dean, Icona Pop, Kenan Thompson & the Pop Trolls

3. Don’t Slack – Anderson .Paak & Justin Timberlake

4. It’s All Love – Anderson .Paak, Justin Timberlake, Mary J. Blige & George Clinton

5. Just Sing – Justin Timberlake, Anna Kendrick, Kelly Clarkson, Mary J. Blige, Anderson .Paak & Kenan Thompson

6. One More Time – Anthony Ramos

7. Atomic Dog World Tour Remix – George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic, Anderson .Paak & Mary J. Blige

8. Rainbows, Unicorns, Everything Nice – Walt Dohrn & Joseph Shirley

9. Rock N Roll Rules – HAIM & Ludwig Göransson

10. Leaving Lonesome Flats – Dierks Bentley

11. Born to Die – Kelly Clarkson

12. Trolls 2 Many Hits Mashup – Anna Kendrick, Justin Timberlake, James Corden, Icona Pop & the Pop Trolls

13. Barracuda – Rachel Bloom

14. Yodel Beat – Ludwig Göransson

15. Crazy Train – Rachel Bloom

16. I Fall to Pieces – Sam Rockwell

17. Perfect for Me – Justin Timberlake

18. Rock You Like a Hurricane – Rachel Bloom

19. It’s All Love (History of Funk) – Anderson .Paak, Mary J. Blige & George Clinton

20. Just Sing (Trolls World Tour) – Justin Timberlake, Anna Kendrick, James Corden, Kelly Clarkson, George Clinton, Mary J. Blige, Anderson .Paak, Rachel Bloom, Kenan Thompson, Anthony Ramos, Red Velvet, Icona Pop & Sam Rockwell

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Normani, Megan Thee Stallion And SZA Discuss Obstacles Faced By Black Women In Music

Normani, Megan Thee Stallion and SZA refuse to be put in a box. The trio who cover Rolling Stone magazine's March 2020 issue, sat down with the publication for "The First Time," a video series where they discussed some of the challenges faced by Black women in music.

“We’re multifaceted, period. As a diaspora and then as a gender so it’s kinda coming in and not being pigeonholed to one space,” SZA said using Megan and Normani’s creative eclecticism as examples. She added that Black female musicians are essentially told by the industry, “Let me tell you exactly how we see you and you can take it from there.’”

“And they try to push that perception on you,” added Normani. “To put that cap on me and to restrict me from the fullest of my capacity. Me [not] being able to explore that just doesn’t seem fair.”

Megan noted that being a Black female artist is about “overcoming being put in a box.”

 

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we been shaping the future @rollingstone happy black history month

A post shared by Normani (@normani) on Feb 19, 2020 at 3:14pm PST

The interview also features Meg, SZA and Normani sharing stories about the first time that they felt like they officially “made it,” and more.

Watch the full video below.

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Ricky Bell, Michael Bivins and Ronnie DeVoe of Bel Biv DeVoe at the 1991 MTV Video Music Awards at in Los Angeles, California.
Jeff Kravitz

"Poison" Turns 30: How Bell Biv DeVoe’s Hit Reinvented New Jack Swing

In February 1990, three R&B underdogs dropped a chart-topping debut single that would be more than just their signature hit—it would become a harbinger for a new style and approach as a new decade dawned. Bell Biv DeVoe may have been unlikely trailblazers, but Ricky Bell, Mike Bivins and Ronnie DeVoe’s classic first single charted a new course for R&B and set the stage for where the genre was heading in the 1990s.

Most R&B fans know the history: fresh off the heels of their bestselling album, New Edition’s members were looking to do other things. Former member Bobby Brown had become a solo superstar, and with the former teen act at a bit of a crossroads following the success of 1988’s Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis-produced Heart Break, lead singers Ralph Tresvant and Johnny Gill were eying their individual projects.

On the suggestion of Jam & Lewis, Bell, Bivins, and DeVoe decided to form a trio. If New Edition was going on hiatus for Tresvant to start his solo career in earnest (as Gill refocused on his own new album with former MCA head Jheryl Busby over at Motown), why not try to do their own thing? Bivins had been brimming with ideas and was eager to try them out in a new format.

Of course, no one was expecting much from the three former New Edition members who’d famously stayed in the background for much of that group’s tenure. Rapper/producer Kwame ghostwrote some of the raps in “Poison,” and he admitted that he wasn’t impressed with the idea of Bell Biv DeVoe as a group—or their soon-to-be-hit.

“The lyrics that ended up making the record were [Ronnie Devoe’s] rhyme,” Kwame would tell Hip-Hop Wired in 2015. “I was hanging out with Mike Bivins. It was me, Mike Bivins and Dana Dane, we were going to a club, somewhere. And [Bivins] put in a tape of the demo of ‘Poison.’ No disrespect, I love the record now, but when I heard the demo I swore it was the worst thing I ever heard in my life.”

“I was like, Y’all gonna put this out? He was like, Yeah man, me, Ronnie and Rick, we going to do a group called BBD. [I’m like], Who wanna see y’all three? I wanna see New Edition! All this breaking up, Bobby solo, Ralph doing his thing, now y’all…what happened to New Edition?!”

BBD’s sound and image was going for something harder than what New Edition or even Bobby Brown had done up to that point. Eschewing the tailored suits and dapper presentation of most 80s R&B, this act was going to set a new blueprint for R&B style with hip-hop swagger.

"The kind of style we were groomed into from our early days had this Temptations, Jacksons, Blue Magic kind of feel. That was what caught us, that whole kind of flavor,” Bell explained to the Baltimore Sun in 1990. But in teaming with producers like Dr. Freeze and hip-house duo Wolf & Epic, they guaranteed that their sound wouldn’t retread what had worked in new jack swing--it would be something unique. "We just figured we'd go in the studio and do what we've been wanting to do all along, the kind of music that we've been listening to," Bell shared. "When we'd go hang out at the clubs or whatever, that's what was happening. We were just into that.

“We wanted that hip-hop flavor, but we wanted to kind of smooth it out. We figured we'd put some harmonies, some melodies over and that would kind of smooth the whole thing out.”

Hitmakers like L.A. & Babyface, Teddy Riley and Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis had dominated the R&B charts during the late 1980s, as new jack swing took over airwaves and dance floors with an infectious blend of tuneful R&B and hip-hop beats. BBD’s manager Hiriam Hicks knew about an up-and-coming producer named Elliot Straite, who went by the name Dr. Freeze. Hicks tapped Freeze for the BBD project, which by then already featured big names like The Bomb Squad.

In a 2016 interview with Red Bull Academy, producer Dr. Freeze said the song’s lyrics were personal for him—even before he had a song to put the words to. “It wasn’t a song at first,” Freeze said. “It was a letter. When I wrote it as a song, I let a lot of my friends hear it, and they said it was weird.”

Freeze’s beat featured a sample of hardcore rhymer Kool G Rap’s hit “Poison” as the hook, and when paired with the group’s image, it helped reintroduce BBD as something more than just “the other guys” in New Edition. Almost immediately, the trio was rebranded as something fresh and exciting. And they had a name for their unique sound and look: “mental.”

"Our music is mentally hip-hop, smoothed out on the R&B tip, with a pop feel appeal to it,” Bell would continuously explain. “We want to be the first to express this kind of music. We knew what we wanted to do."

The group would work with hip-hop powerhouses like the aforementioned Bomb Squad and superproducer Marley Marl, setting the table for hip-hop producers to tackle R&B projects. With the notable exception of Teddy Riley, the idea that hip-hop producers crafting R&B tracks was still novel in 1990, but over the next ten years, hip-hop heavyweights from Jermaine Dupri to Kay Gee to Timbaland would produce some of the biggest R&B records of the decade.

"We listened to Public Enemy's stuff and we were just amazed," Bell said at the time. "We just thought, 'Damn! Imagine us doing something like that.' Because we always think 'Why not?' We always ask that question. A lot of artists don't. So we'll just do anything, just go with our feelings. And that's usually what works best for us."

Bell Biv DeVoe’s uniquely “Mental” approach would prove wildly influential. Even in the new jack swing era, R&B acts mostly marketed themselves in the sophisticated, urbane mold of Luther Vandross, Anita Baker, and Freddie Jackson. BBD’s former New Edition cohort Bobby Brown had done much to shift the image of the contemporary R&B singer to something much more brazen and aggressive, but even his smash 1988 album Don’t Be Cruel featured mostly slick, romantic R&B/pop. With “Poison”s thumping beat and “never trust a big butt and a smile” refrain, it announced a brash new approach to R&B that would come to define the genre in the 1990s. When one considers the hip-hop-drenched look and attitude of everyone from Jodeci to Usher, Bell Biv DeVoe and “Poison” represent a seismic shift.

“The engine for Bell Biv DeVoe was Michael Bivins,” Shocklee explained in 2015. “He had a vision for the group. New Edition was all about wearing suits and dressing upscale. Michael brought it back to the street realm. They really brought out the hip hop element by wearing Timberland boots and sagging pants. This is what gave the group their visual look.”

Thirty years later, it may be easy to take “Poison” and BBD for granted. It’s the kind of dance floor classic that becomes ubiquitous at family reunions and wedding receptions. But the last three decades have proven its staying power—and its lasting influence. Nobody may be calling it “mental” anymore, but it’s still pretty damn cool. In 1990, nobody would’ve predicted this song would be this influential. Or this timeless. It made stars out of a trio of backup singers. Not a bad look for “the other guys.”

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