Is Nick Cannon Gearing Up To Play Richard Pryor?

Get More: Music News

If you were wondering what was up with the ‘fro Nick Cannon has been sporting recently, it seems the new look may have to do with preparing for a coveted biopic role. The comedian/actor/rapper is doing some research for a movie on the life of comedic legend Richard Pryor. The rumor mill began churning earlier this year with reports that Lee Daniels, director of The Butler, would be at the helm of a Pryor-based film. And though Marlon Wayans’ name was also in the hat for the starring role, Cannon tells MTV News that he is getting prepared. “I’m doing the work; I’m working right now,” he said. “It’s a coveted role. So I don’t really want to play with it in a sense to where it’s like ‘Oh yeah, this is the next thing I’m doing,’ or anything like that. Not to brag on it but i’m doing the work right now. As anybody who wants to take this craft seriously, you gotta go in there and do everything you gotta do.” SEE ALSO: Stand-Up Guys: Nick Cannon Speaks On Richard Pryor's Influence While Cannon did not confirm that anything was set in stone, he did detail his experience with Pryor’s work, sharing that the legend’s work was among his first impressions as a comedian. “It’s one of those things where I’ve always known and been familiar with things like Mudbone and ‘the junkie and the wino’ routine,” he said. “It’s interesting now that i’m doing a lot of the research and actually digging really deep and trying to find every piece of work that he ever laid his hands on.” But Mr. Mariah Carey is not out of the woods just yet. TMZ has reported that Pryor’s family prefers Wayans for the role. And in an effort to not jump the gun, Cannon is mums the word on just how much is official. “The movie is not in production. Let’s just say that,” he said. Watch Nick Cannon talk studying Richard Pryor in the video above.

From the Web

More on Vibe

Frederick M. Brown

Ja’Net DuBois, Star Of ‘Good Times’ And More, Has Died

Ja’Net DuBois, the revered Emmy-winning actress known for her roles on Good Times, The PJ's and more, died on Tuesday (Feb. 18). She was 74.

DuBois passed away unexpectedly in her sleep, TMZ reports. She was reportedly found inside her Glendale, Calif. home. Further details surrounding DuBois' sudden death are unknown.

A multi-talented singer-songwriter, actress and dancer, DuBois made a name for herself as the next door neighbor, Willona Woods, on Good Times where she starred alongside John Amos, Esther Rolle, Ralph Carter, Bernnadette Stanis, Jimmie Walker, Johnny Brown, and Janet Jackson. DuBois also composed and sang the “Movin’ on Up” theme song for The Jeffersons.

Raised in Amityville, N.Y., DuBois began her acting career in the theater in the 1950s. She appeared in the Broadway play Golden Boy with Sammy Davis Jr. and Louis Gossett Jr., and A Raisin in the Sun. She went on to land various TV roles including guest spots on Sanford and Son and Shaft, prior to joining the cast of Good Times from 1974 until 1979.

DuBois won back-to-back Emmy awards in 1999 and 2000, for her voiceover work on The PJ's. Her acting credits include Roots: The Next Generation, The Wayans Bros., Basic Instinct, Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle, I’m Gonna Get You Sucka, and Tropic Thunder. 

DuBois is survived by her three children.

 

 

Continue Reading
Nas and A$AP Ferg host Hennessy All-Star Weekend Saturday night at The Old Post Office in Chicago in celebration of the newly announced multiyear partnership between the spirit and NBA.
Caleb Zahm

Nas Hosts Hennessy's All-Star Weekend Party, DaBaby And A$AP Ferg Perform

Hennessy celebrated its NBA multi-year spirit partnership with festivities during the league's All-Star Weekend. After hosting an intimate reception, the global cognac brand turned the vibe up, hosted an evening of cocktails and performances at the Gentlemen’s Lounge in Chicago's Old Post Office. Nas served as the welcoming host of the night as he introduced his fellow Hennessy ambassador A$AP Ferg, who kicked off the night of performances.

After warming up the crowd with performances of  "Work," "Plain Jane" and his new single "Value," he brought out MadeinTYO to perform a short number. Shortly after, DaBaby amped up the crowd with a high-energy set with performances of "Bop," "Suge," and more alongside Billion Dollar Baby Entertainment artists Stunna 4 Vegas and Rich Dunk.

As the Hennessy specialty drinks flowed and bites made their rounds, some of music and sports' biggest stars stopped by the event to enjoy the fanfare including Saweetie, Dave East, and others. Scroll through more images down below to see what you missed.

Continue Reading
(L-R) God Shammgod, Jadakiss, and Russ Bengston at the PUMA x LeagueFits Panel discussion.
Courtesy of PUMA

Chuck D, Dave East, Jadakiss & God Shammgod Talk Sneaker Culture And Public Enemy’s Legacy At PUMA Pop-Up

In celebration of Def Jam and PUMA Hoop's latest sneaker release, the legendary Chuck D of Public Enemy sat down with writer Russ Bengtson, rappers Jadakiss, Dave East, and basketball street legend God Shammgod for a live panel discussion during the 2020 NBA All-Star Weekend (Feb. 15).

Held inside the League Fits Lounge powered by the PUMA Hoops pop-up, the four panelists chatted about the new PUMA Sky LX and PUMA Clyde kicks, Public Enemy's legacy and the rise of hip-hop and sneaker culture. Jadakiss, East, Chuck D, and Shammgod all pledged their allegiance to the rapidly growing culture.

"I'm a sneaker addict. Until I die, I think I'm always going to be excited with new sneakers," said East. "I like knowing I'm going home and there are sneakers that I ordered that are waiting for me. These [PUMA] sneakers are dope and I'm happy to be here with Chuck D sharing this moment."

"It’s a form of accomplishment like I made it," said Jadakiss when asked about his thoughts on the collaboration and speaking on the panel with the hip-hop legend. "How many years I spent listening to Public Enemy and for Chuck D to be a fan and acknowledge me as a constituent, a colleague, and contemporary in some form is a feeling that no money or accolade can compare to."

 

View this post on Instagram

 

The Chi today debuting the new PE - PUMA Collab. Talking Hip Hop + B-Ball w @jadakiss @daveeast @leaguefits @pumahoops at 4:30 Get em at puma.com 💥💥💥 ..... ...... ...... #nbaallstar #chuckd #pumahoops #sneakers #kicks #collection #fightthepower #fearofablackplanet #publicenemy #publicenemyradio #hiphop #daveeast #jadakiss

A post shared by Chuck D 🎤 (@mrchuckd_pe) on Feb 15, 2020 at 12:53pm PST

Chuck D also shared some gems and stories from his time when Public Enemy's popularity skyrocketed in the early '90s. Public Enemy became one of the most popular groups in hip-hop history for their socio-political rhymes and in-your-face attitude. Many rappers strive to be the most popular artist in the game but for Chuck D and his band of brothers, their perspective was different.

"My goal wasn't to be like the popular group that everybody loved. We wanted to see groups and artists around us do well," Chuck D recalls. "We wanted to see young people do well. We were already older and we weren't trying to impress anybody."

When Public Enemy made their debut there was nothing like the militaristic rap crew from Long Island. Their music criticized the media and spoke heavily on the plights that blacks faced in the United States.

"We represented a fu**ed up situation. It was a wilder time in hip-hop before records in 1978 and 1979, and we saw sh*t for three to four years," said Chuck D about the inspiration behind the group’s formation. "Hip-hop came out of those ashes to speak out against a lot of that bullsh*t and didn't get an answer to years later."

 

View this post on Instagram

 

NEW YORK STATE OF MIND. 🗽

A post shared by God Shammgod (@godshammgod12) on Feb 15, 2020 at 4:22pm PST

As most people thought Public Enemy were too aggressive and hated the white community, Chuck D reminded the audience that wasn't the case. "We didn’t come against society like f**k white people. No, this is our story [that] you need to hear instead of that bullsh*t story," Chuck D said.

At the end of the discussion, Chuck D gave props to his three guests for their contributions to the culture; He shared how he enjoys playing East's music all the time, praised Jadakiss' raspy voice for its sound on a record, and saluted Shammgod for his global impact on the game of basketball. "I'm proud to be on this panel man because I've studied each and every one of these creatives in their life."

PUMA Hoops and Def Jam's sophomore release celebrates Public Enemy's game-changing third album Fear of a Black Planet with two different iterations of the PUMA Sky LX and PUMA Clyde, two sneakers that Public Enemy and several other Def Jam artists wore back in the day.

The PUMA x Public Enemy Sky LX features a white and red colorway with a leather upper and Def Jam's logo plastered on the tongue and Chuck D's iconic "Fight the Power" verse stamped on the side. The PUMA x Public Enemy Clyde, on the other hand, features an all-red upper with black accents. The lowcut sneaker also features a white outsole with "FEAR OF A BLACK PLANET" written across it.

Continue Reading

Top Stories