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More Tea: Tamar Braxton Issues Chris Brown A Lengthy Read

Chris Brown set the Internet on fire Monday night (Nov.3) when he slammed The Real hosts Adrienne Bailon and Tamar Braxton on Instagram for their comments regarding his relationship to model girlfriend Karrueche Tran. While Brown has since since deleted his post, Braxton--who he referred to as a "muppet" and accused Bailon of sleeping with married men--has since responded. Read what the "Love & War" singer had to say below.

#whenyourgirlhasatalkshowinsteadofcryingaboutyouwhileONone... you are asked to talk about certain things such as A.relationships B.family C.fashion D. Things that has to do with HER in life! @chrisbrownofficial @karrueche no one came at either of you but was simply using your relationship as an example of things us ladies go through in a relationship!! I do not know nor do I give a hot damn about your relationship personally.... honestly and respectfully I'm VERY sorry if you BOTH were offended about our girl chat.... however you WILL NOT think its ok to come at GROWN women and talk to either myself or @adrienne_bailon as if u have EVER has us each in your bed at ANY point in our lives! (Maybe your mind is clouded) NOTE TO SELF: u are NOT my MAN or my DADDY so you got me completely FUCKED up!...(like your reputation) I'm not 20 nothing years old and I am fine with all 3 #1 tv shows and making my dreams come true with Love&War and now #letmeknow...which is on iTunes. you are only a few years older than my son and I will not tolerate your disrespect when no one was coming for you!!! so this RICH/BLESSED muppet who WAS always VERY nice to you and your girl will continue to work my ass of and make amazing records and positive television while YOU...In this very queenish mood you are experiencing.......Instead of coming on ig...and acting like a B.A.N!!...should have and could have picked up the phone!! ...or watched the show for yourself!!! At least that's what REAL men do! #thereal on fox and @bet?? #backtoworkigo #liveinyourtruth #wewouldbetheBESTJudiesEVER #letmeknowifkarruchiehasamouthsheshoulduseitnotYOU #dontfuckwithmefellasthisisnotherfirsttimeattherodeo #grown #still??yalltho #wenotbeefing Well...***sips tea*** okay Tamar. SEE ALSO: Chris Brown Slams Adrienne Bailon And Tamar Braxton On Instagram Karrueche bucked back with some words of her own, and Tamar made sure to address that, too.

Unlike most of you... I could care less about the opinions of others.. Drama doesn't amuse me - so yes @tamarbraxton I do have a voice, just not like yours.. However my bf I can't speak for.. We all know he has no chill. Just like everyone else out there - he has an opinion. Have you ever thought to yourself how it may feel being judged for everything you do and half the time people have no clue what is going on? You people invest so much of your time in other peoples lives and business and get mad when they have something to say back?! If you can dish it.. You gotta be able to take it.. A lot of you mistaken my quietness for stupidity, and thats fine because I don't care what you think. Anyways- I'm not here for the drama ??What do you gain from the names you call me?

A photo posted by karrueche (@karrueche) on

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'Black Monday' Explores Mo's Backstory With Narration Of '60s Soul Music: Episode 8 Recap

For seven episodes, we got glimpses into the past that molded Mo into the savage trader he is. Episode “7042” finally takes us closer to his origin, and apparently, that leads us to Los Angeles in 1968. The Jheri curl is now a blown-out afro, and his ruthless mercantilism on Wall Street is replaced by altruism for underserved communities, as a member of the Black Panther Party. The glimpses into his past — the Church’s Chicken on his birthday, his visit with Jammer — all begin to congeal into one vision of a misguided man.

The domineering Xosha Roquemore plays the role of Candance, the woman who Jammer intimated broke Mo’s heart. Roquemore’s last recurring role was as comedian Dawn Lima on Showtime’s I’m Dying Up Here, a short-lived series about the seedy side of stand-up comedy in the early 1970s. Her as Candace is another stellar casting choice. Roquemore was able to speak honey-coated bullets that can pierce any man’s ego in a way that’s both comforting and impactful as a Black woman comic in the 1970s. It’s just as mesmerizing to watch on Black Monday as a Black Panther member in the 1960s.

This arc, while entertaining, seemed to continue an awkward trend in Black Monday: the Black woman bears the weight of the man’s faults. Candace is portrayed as the person who took Mo from thinking of others and drug-free to a staunch individualist who probably has cocaine residue in his DNA. Similarly, it’s Dawn who is the cause of Mo’s Jammer Group being partly owned by the Lehman Brothers in the episode “243,” and the one who feels the obligation to blow up her marriage and future love life to save a risky Georgina Play that Mo involved her in without her say. But, then again, Regina Hall and Roquemore deliver two of the most emotionally jarring performances of the episode and demonstrate two separate, but equally as profound, ways of Black women releasing themselves from the control of men.

Taking Black Monday to the 1960s accomplishes a number of worthwhile feats otherwise unlikely in the 1980s Wall Street timeline. For one, the first 90 seconds of this episode features a wider variety of Black faces than the last seven episodes had, combined. But, more than anything, the new timeline allows for the soul music of the ‘60s to narrate the story.

Music Narrator

Music has always played a noticeable part in the show, but more so as a reinforcement of the time period. In this episode, the sounds of the time guide the audience and take them deeper into the character than what they see on the screen.

In the episode’s opening, soul singer Harry Krapsho lets us know “I don’t care about money too much” and “I don’t have a dollar to my name, and if you don’t mind I’d like to keep it the same” on his song “Don’t Worry.” Those sentiments play as a Black man, whom we don’t realize is Mo, exits a bus in Los Angeles, California. Before we find out Mo wasn’t money-hungry in his past — and formerly known as Roland — the sweet sounds of Harry Krapsho let us know.

Candace deceptively persuades Mo to abandon his principles by smoking weed and going against the Black Panther Party’s wishes, as Sandy Szigeti’s “Make Believe World” scores the scene. After, the plot twist minutes later, the song is a shrewd act of foreshadowing by the showrunners. But, It’s the late, great Nina Simone’s rendition of the 1967 song “I Shall Be Released,” written by Bob Dylan, that expands the Black Monday world.

 

Near the end of the episode, Candace’s true identity is revealed while she’s looking into the eyes of the men and women who seem to have put her in such a position. When Nina’s voice wails out “I remember every face of every man who put me here,” Candace’s motives become more complex. Black Monday lets the music leave you with the thought that Candace may have been compromised by the FBI, and in order to avoid jail time, she would have to turn in her fellow Black people. The steely resolve in her final words to Mo — “I told you, ‘I got you.’”— further complicates that theory and adds an engrossing richness to Candace’s character.

Black Monday could’ve left Nina Simone’s rendition for the climax of the flashback arc and the episode would still be great. But, Nina returns for one last “I shall be released” after Mo sends Dawn packing following her revelation to Mo about who she really loves. The image of Dawn piercing her lips and steadying her gaze on the countryside instead of being shocked into submission by Mo’s thoughtless decision, while Nina belts out her hope for release, is a moment of Black perseverance we would’ve never thought a show like Black Monday would make a focal point in such an important episode.

The episode also ends with an uncharacteristically sentimental Mo reverting back to his selfish ways at the same time Ms. Simone sings about “release.” And just like that, one four-minute song helps set up the emotional stakes at hand in the final two episodes of Black Monday’s first season.

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Amar'e Stoudemire Wanted To Sign J. Cole To His Hypocalypto Label

In a cover story for GQ, J. Cole opened up about his views on peeling back the layers of wanting to stay out of the spotlight, changing his life in order to be ready to raise his firstborn, and the importance of his fans. While those topics were addressed, a revelation that speaks to Cole's beginnings was also shared.

When the 34-year-old artist promoted his first mixtape The Come-Up, his manager and longtime friend Ibrahim "Ib" Hamad helped to get the 2007 project in the minds of music labels, writers, and other tastemakers throughout the industry. Hamad's cousin, Amin El-Hassan, also extended a helping hand. He worked for the Phoenix Suns at the time and assisted with introducing Cole's music to the NBA players.

Now-retired, one of those athletes that wanted to take Cole's career a step further was Amar'e Stoudemire. The 36-year-old planned to sign the Fayetteville native to his record label Hypocalyto, a feat El-Hassan believed was great news, but, "Ib said, 'Oh, thanks, man, but we've got some bigger fish to fry.'" What they had cooking was a deal with Jay-Z's Roc Nation and the rest is history.

Another revelation concerning music and the accolades that an artist can receive, Cole mentioned that not winning 2012's Best New Artist award at the Grammys was actually a blessing. "It would've been disastrous for me, because subconsciously it would've been sending me a signal of like 'Okay, I am supposed to be this guy,'" he said. "But I would've been the dude that had that one great album and then fizzled out."

The "Love Yourz" rapper continued to state that if it's meant to be, he will one day win a gramophone. "I'm not supposed to have a Grammy, you know what I mean. At least not right now, and maybe never," he said. "And if that happens, then that's just how it was supposed to be."

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Connecticut School Employee Resigns After Racist Grocery Store Video Goes Viral

A  Connecticut resident has resigned from her position at the Hamden Public School District after a video posted to Facebook shows her using racial slurs and spitting on two black people while at a local Shop Rite.

According to The New Haven Register, Corinne Terrone who was a clerk in the district's central office, is seen with her two children when the confrontation erupts. Terrone uses the N-Word three times and spits at a black man and black woman. It's unclear how the clash begins.

After Terrone's first use of the slur, the man on video rushes toward Terrone as she attempts to take her phone out and record. “Put your hands on me, come on!” she says. He then slaps the phone out of her hand. That's the only physical encounter between the two caught on video.

The Facebook post, which has received more than 180,000 views, overwhelmingly supported the black man and woman. A spokesman for the school wrote on the district's website that Terrone "has been separated from employment effective immediately.”

“While it appears as though this happened after work hours on Friday evening, the Human Resource Director contacted the employee and arranged an investigatory meeting with her. Shortly after final arrangements were made for the investigatory meeting, the employee rendered her resignation effective immediately.”

Due to the fact that Terrone's children were present during the verbal assault, the district filed a report with DCF services.

Republican State Sen. Len Fasano and state Rep. Joseph Zullo released a joint statement condemning Terrone's language and behavior.

“What we saw in this video is repulsive and deeply offensive and does not represent the people of East Haven or our values. The behavior is shocking and upsetting and has no place anywhere, including in our community,” Fasano and Zullo said in the statement. “We understand Hamden Public Schools has acted quickly to seek this employee’s resignation. East Haven police are also seeking more information and urging any potential victims or witnesses involved to come forward. Hate speech and violence will not be tolerated in our community.”

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