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Mila J And Future Have Only One Objective For The Night On New Single 'Freaknic'

::slow body rolls::

Mila J isn't a timid woman. The Left Coast native made a name for herself last year with her M.I.L.A. (Made In Los Angeles) EP and now, Jhene Aiko's big sister is back with a sensual new hit.

SEE ALSO: New Video, Mila J Featuring B.o.B "Champion"

Tapping Future for the hook, "Freaknic" is exactly what you expect the song to be about. Mila J and Future only have one objective: to please and be pleased by the other.

SEE ALSO: Bobby Brackins Nabs Too Short, Mila J and IAMSU For "Hot Boy (Remix)"

Spin the track and hit your body roll.

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Gerald Walker

Premiere: Gerald Walker Releases 'Can't Drive A Parked Car'

Rappers have shown entrepreneurial spirit for as long as many of us can remember, starting or buying into clothing lines, alcohol companies, and more. But Chicago rapper Gerald Walker is looking to pair his music with a different world: fragrances.

"In a noisy world where anxiety and stress run rampant I wanted to do something about it. While in Marseille, France this summer I had a⁣n idea of merging smooth, soothing music with fragrances," Walker told VIBE.

"Today that idea is a reality. I’m thrilled to introduce: the Ayọ Fragrance + Design Studio. 'Ayọ' means 'Joy' in Yoruba and every fragrance seeks to catalyze that very emotion through smell."

“Can’t Drive a Parked Car” is a slinky, synthy record that sees Walker prophesying about pursuing one's goals while avoiding procrastination and excuses. It appears on Ayọ Volume One, which will be released on January 3rd, 2020. To get scents that accompany the music, visit http://ayostudios.com.

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Courtesy of Crudo Means Raw

Premiere: Crudo Means Raw And Mabiland Reunite For Jazzy Single "La Titular"

R&B in Español isn't a new exploration, but rapper/producer Crudo Means Raw and vocalist Mabiland's latest collaboration makes it feel scared and fresh. The Colombian artists have joined forces once again for "La Titular," a thoughtful blend of dembow-funk and jazzy chords guaranteed to entice a body roll or two.

Crudo views the track as a moody rap number which makes sense given his inspirations like a Tribe Called Quest, CL Smooth and Sade. In addition to notes of love on "La Titular" it's also one of self-reflection. “La Titular" came at a time when we both found emotional stability and a couple of complicated queens," Mabiland tells VIBE VIVA. "It is also true that it emerged at a time of many changes where in progress; both changing as people, and somehow everything was also in a transition. I always enjoy being able to work with a man I am a fan of and who I call a friend." The two scored a hit last year in the Afro-Colombian fusion space and beyond with “La Mitad De La Mitad,” leading Crudo to collaborate with Juanes and former high school classmate J Balvin.

"All over the city, they were banging that track in nightclubs,” he told Rolling Stone about the track. “It would be the 2 a.m. part of the party where it gets really grimy and ratchet, and they would play my song.” If "La Mitad De La Mitad" is the turn-up, "La Titular" is definitely the futuristic Quiet Storm turn down. Other players on the track include guitarist Byron Sánchez and Las musas (Sandra Moore , Amuna y Alie) on the chorus.

 

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LA TITULAR @mabiland x @crudomeansraw de aleteo en Medellín el próximo 7 de diciembre. Boletería en: www.salallena.com @salallenacom @cooltoarteycalle @madradio.co Dj invitados: @tesheeee @tornall Visual x @ednadaism

A post shared by Mabiland (@mabiland) on Oct 30, 2019 at 11:03am PDT

Enjoy "La Titular" below.

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Devi Love and Charlamagne tha God attend AfroTech 2019 at Oakland Marriott City Center on November 08, 2019 in Oakland, California.
Robin L Marshall/Getty Images for AfroTech

At AfroTech, Black Tech Innovators Ban Together To Make Their Voices Heard

Entrepreneur Delane Parnell made history last year after his esports software company PlayVS raised $15 million for its Series-A funding round, making it the largest Series-A ever raised by a Black founder in consumer internet. In September of this year PlayVS, which provides a platform for competitive high school esports competitions, again made headlines when it announced that it raised an additional $81 million in funding from a group of notable investors that included Adidas, Samsung, Sean “Diddy” Combs, and the Los Angeles Dodgers. Over the course of 15 months, the company raised a combined total of $96 million in funding to expand the business and a 27-year-old Parnell, who serves as the company’s CEO, became one of the most talked-about Black founders in tech.

During a time when only 1 percent of venture capital funding is going to Black founders and only 0.2 percent of venture capital funding is going to Black women founders, Parnell’s recent success represents an anomaly in the tech startup world. Despite a major increase in press concerning the lack of access and opportunities that Black founders in tech receive and an incredible growth in minority-focused venture capital funds and resources, the PlayVS founder remains a part of a small but growing crop of Black millennial tech founders that have created innovative business solutions so desirable that even the predominantly white-male dominated tech world has been forced to recognize and support them.

Blavity Inc. Founder and CEO Morgan DeBaun is also a member of this burgeoning class of Black millennial startup founders making noise in the industry. Last year, Blavity Inc., which owns Black millennial media and event platforms Blavity, Shadow and Act, Travel Noire, 21 Ninety, AfroTech, and Summit 21, raised a $6.5 million Series-A funding round and grew the company from one office and 30 employees to two offices and over 80 employees. DeBaun, who founded media company Blavity Inc. in 2014 with her three co-founders Jonathan Jackson, Jeff Nelson and Aaron Samuels, is vocal about the struggles not only Black tech founders face but the ones Black tech employees experience working at large white tech companies. Last month, DeBaun once again had a platform to speak on these issues during Blavity’s fourth annual AfroTech Conference, a tech conference geared toward Black millennial founders.

 

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#AfroTech has information and knowledge for everyone. You can find advice from other founders, VCs to pitch your company to, or the tech talent you may need to get your idea going. Don't miss out on new connections that can help you succeed. #linkinbio #careeropportunities #careergoals #venturecapitalist #founders

A post shared by AfroTech (@afro.tech) on Aug 21, 2019 at 5:19pm PDT

AfroTech was created in 2016 as an event to highlight Black tech innovators and provide more opportunities and information for them to succeed. The first three years of the conference took place in San Francisco, Calif., the U.S. epicenter of technology startups. This year, the festival was moved to Oakland, Calif., a strategic move meant to honor a city with a rich Black history and patronize the small Black businesses, that despite aggressive gentrification, are still operating today. During the second weekend of November, Downtown Oakland hosted 10,000 Black tech innovators from around the U.S. looking to form meaningful connections, learn from one another, and celebrate the rising profile of Black people in tech.

One of AfroTech’s primary missions is to address the lack of information Black millennials have about the technology industry. The dozens of high-profile guest speakers, which included Parnell, The ShadeRoom founder Angelica Nwandu, lawyer and political commentator Angela Rye, and media personality Charlamagne Tha God, were carefully selected to provide Black founders, college students, and employees access to knowledge that would better equip them to lead successful tech careers. Across four different stages, speakers shared their experiences and advice on venture capital funding, coding, the cannabis industry, media, and blockchain.

“We don’t always have the vocabulary to frame our success so that we can have opportunities like getting venture capital,” DeBaun tells VIBE prior to taking the main stage at day one of AfroTech. “Part of AfroTech is creating information so that people know how to talk about what they are already doing. We don’t have to change much besides just the vocabulary and breaking down some of the biases we have been taught about ourself.”

Although knowledge plays a big part in enabling Black people in tech to receive greater opportunities, a supportive and well-connected network pipeline is another key factor necessary to fuel the group’s success. In tech, warm introductions and word of mouth rivals technical skills and ability during the job selection process. Ivy League and country club connections make it difficult for non-white people to penetrate the exclusive tech veil. A harsh reality that new diversity and inclusion departments and new executives are apparently working hard to change.

 

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Reports revealed #Al's discriminatory instincts — including mislabeling Black people as gorillas — are only getting worse. What can we do to improve the future of artificial intelligence and remedy the tech industry's diversity problem? #Tech #Afrotech #Al #artificialintelligence

A post shared by AfroTech (@afro.tech) on Aug 23, 2019 at 12:47pm PDT

“Unfortunately we have been trained to have a mindset of deficit, that we can be one of only,” says DeBaun about the lack of representation in tech spaces. “The vision of AfroTech is that we show that it’s an abundance, it’s unlimited potential, unlimited power. So if you have access you should give it to someone else. That’s your duty and your responsibility because you wouldn’t have gotten here if someone hadn’t given you access most likely. AfroTech is actually designed to try to speed that up.”

AfroTech’s socialization component may be the most valuable part of the weekend. Dozens of high-profile tech companies from Google to Twitter, Lyft to YouTube, sent representatives to set up booths to recruit potential job candidates and share valuable information about its diversity efforts. Diversity-focused venture capital firms like Harlem Capital Partners and Precursor Ventures were also engaged with founders and swapped business cards during the conference’s designated networking periods. For Black people who did not attend an Ivy League school or grow up with a country club membership, these moments provided a valuable and direct pipeline to the world’s largest companies.

AfroTech’s opportunities for connection and knowledge distribution did not simply end once the conference did. The AfroTech app, website, and Slack channel have continued to provide helpful resources and opportunities for Black people in tech to communicate with one another. With platforms like AfroTech, Black Women Talk Tech, Black Girls Code and Black Founders, Black people in tech are provided with opportunities to not only empower themselves in this industry but support and empower other Black people in the process.

 

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"A lot of the opportunities I have is because I invited myself instead of waiting to be invited. I don’t often wait for people to validate whether or not I should be in the room. I make that decision myself. In this world, you can’t be afraid of “no” or “sorry, I can’t help you”. You let that be fuel to keep going no matter what. 👊🏾" - @carterlove⠀ ⠀ We found this story in our mentions and just had to reshare these inspirational vibes! We know many #BlacksInTech can wait forever to "be invited" to the table, so it's so important to be the change and invite ourselves! ✊🏾Or better yet, make our own 💁🏾.⠀ ⠀ What are some ways you invite yourself to opportunities? Let's talk about it!👇🏾

A post shared by AfroTech (@afro.tech) on Nov 20, 2019 at 5:31pm PST

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