Chet Haze N-Word
Chet Haze N-Word
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Tom Hanks' Son Refuses To Stop Saying The N-Word

Apparently, Chet Haze thinks it's ok for white peoople to say the N-word... because "it's 2015."

Tom Hanks' son Chester Hanks obviously does not care about being politically correct. After garnering backlash for his use of the N-word, the rapper — who goes by the name Chet Haze — explained why he refuses to stop saying it.

“The majority of ya’ll are not going to get this because the history is still so fresh in our country,” he explained. “But hip hop isn’t about race. It's about the culture you identify with.”

In addition to posing his argument, Haze also wrote a lengthy caption, explaining that he slings around the infamous term because to him, it’s a form of spreading “love” and expressing a sense of brotherhood among all:

If I say the word nigga I say it amongst people I love and who love me. If I say "fuck yall hatin ass niggaz" it's because that's really how I felt at the time. And I don't accept society getting to decide what ANYBODY can or can't say. That's something we call FREE SPEECH. Now I understand the older generation who grew up in the Jim Crowe era might have strong feelings against this. And that's understandable... But what I'm saying is this is 2015... And even tho we are still far from where we need to be and black people are still being literally KILLED by a RACIST and fucked up system... We have also reached a point where the word can no longer have a negative connotation if we so choose. And who is to say only black people can use it? The way I see it, it's a word that unifies the culture of HIP-HOP across ALL RACES, which is actually kind of a beautiful thing. It's a word that can be used out of camaraderie and love, not just exclusively for black people. What's the point in putting all these built up "rules" about it. It's time to let go. You can hate me or love me for it, but can't nobody tell me what I can or can't say. It's got nothing to do with trying to be a thug. It's about the culture of the music. And that's all I have to say about that (no pun intended) lol. It's all love. Some people will get it, some people won't. Either way, Ima keep living my life however the fuck I want. ALL LOVE

SEE ALSO: Opinion: Why Are Non-Blacks Still Dropping N Bombs?

Whether or not he defines the N-word as a term of endearment—the masses will note that he is still a (highly) privileged white man, and racism (clearly) still exists. Check out Chet's very candid video below.

If I say the word nigga I say it amongst people I love and who love me. If I say "fuck yall hatin ass niggaz" it's because that's really how I felt at the time. And I don't accept society getting to decide what ANYBODY can or can't say. That's something we call FREE SPEECH. Now I understand the older generation who grew up in the Jim Crowe era might have strong feelings against this. And that's understandable... But what I'm saying is this is 2015... And even tho we are still far from where we need to be and black people are still being literally KILLED by a RACIST and fucked up system... We have also reached a point where the word can no longer have a negative connotation if we so choose. And who is to say only black people can use it? The way I see it, it's a word that unifies the culture of HIP-HOP across ALL RACES, which is actually kind of a beautiful thing. It's a word that can be used out of camaraderie and love, not just exclusively for black people. What's the point in putting all these built up "rules" about it. It's time to let go. You can hate me or love me for it, but can't nobody tell me what I can or can't say. It's got nothing to do with trying to be a thug. It's about the culture of the music. And that's all I have to say about that (no pun intended) lol. It's all love. Some people will get it, some people won't. Either way, Ima keep living my life however the fuck I want. ALL LOVE.

A video posted by LA / WORLD WIDE (@chethanx) on

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The Body Of Ohio Activist Amber Evans Was Found In The Scioto River

The body of 28-year-old Amber Evans was found in Ohio's Scioto River Saturday. (March 23) Evans, a beloved activist, had been missing since January 28.

According to reports, Evans' body was found by Columbus Police. The activist worked with several social justice organizations including the Juvenile Justice Coalition in which she was promoted to executive director.

Evans was reported missing in January following a dispute with her boyfriend of 10 years. Local authorities did, however, say her boyfriend has been cooperative.

“Since the beginning of the investigation that there were no known domestic violence issues in Evans’ relationship and there was no reason to suspect foul play,” the Columbus-Dispatch reports.

*UPDATE 3/24/19: The body recovered yesterday, Saturday, 3/23/19 has been positively identified as 28yo Amber Evans. The family has been notified.While this is not the outcome we hoped for, we understand this brings closure for the family. Our thoughts & prayers go out to them. https://t.co/YF2iAS4LSN

— Columbus Ohio Police (@ColumbusPolice) March 24, 2019

Evans went to work the morning of Jan 28 and left at 5:30 PM after feeling sick. A security camera at a local store captured her purchasing cold medicine and a Snickers. Evans' abandoned car was found later that evening in the Scioto Mile area with her purse in the track. Her cell phone was located the next day in another part of the Scioto Mile.

Tonya Fischer, Evans' mother, took to social media to express her appreciation for the outpouring of support.

“I’m coming on here as a mother who has just found out that I lost my first-born child,” Fischer said, choking up as she spoke. “I love you all, and you all know I’m more than willing to accept all that you have to give... but just give me a moment. Just a moment. Give my family a moment.”

 

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Jessica Hill

The Father Of A Sandy Hook Shooting Victim Committed Suicide

The father of a first-grader killed during 2012's Sandy Hook school shooting committed suicide.

Jeremy Richman 49, was found dead inside his office space Monday morning (March 25). Local authorities said the medical examiner's office has not confirmed a cause of death.

Richman, a trained scientist, and his wife Jennifer Hensel launched the Avielle Foundation after his 6-year-old daughter Avielle Richman. The foundation is committed to providing funding for the neuroscience behind compassion and violence.

In a 2017 interview with NPR, Richman discussed the heartache he and his wife experienced in the years following Avielle's murder. “It was like a ghost limb syndrome, you know, where you keep thinking ‘Where’s Avielle? Do we need to pick her up?’” he said. “And every day you’d have this [realization] that I don’t have a child, and I don’t have to parent. That was just brutal.”

Richman also said with each new shooting, it just resurrected raw emotions.

“Right after Newtown we had the Boston bombings, and then we’ve had Charleston, Orlando and over a hundred school shootings, some of which make the national news and some don’t,” he said. “Every time this happens it breaks a heart and it chokes us up. To be honest, though, now it comes with a fair degree of frustration and anger because things aren’t changing fast enough. I really get sick of ‘thoughts and prayers,’ and ‘our hearts go out.’ That’s not going to change anything. What I need to hear is: ‘My heart is broken, and my boots are on the ground to fix it.’ ”

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The famous Leonardo Da Vinci painting ' The Mona Lisa' is seen on display in the Grande Galerie of the Louvre museum on August 24, 2005 in Paris, France. Dan Brown is the author of numerous bestsellers, including Digital Fortress, Angels and Demons, and Deception Point. His acclaimed novel 'The Da Vinci Code'has become one of the most widely read books of all time. (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

Father Who Also Doubles As A Sketch Artist Surprises Daughter With Stunning Portrait Of Her As Mona Lisa

The Mona Lisa has seen many variations over the years from Lego mosaics to a "Melanated Mona." The latest remix comes from a talented sketch artist who recreated the iconic painting by switching out Mona with his daughter.

On Saturday (March 23), Laurence "Sketch" Cheatham posted a video of his daughter's reaction to his homage. While using his daughter's own stunning photograph, Cheatham's elegant take almost left his daughter speechless. "That's me! Oh my gosh, I'm the Mona Lisa," she said in awe. "[This is] so cool. Thank you. Oh my gosh. How did you do that?"

In between her amazement, Sketch shared how it took three months to create his now-viral image. His talents don't stop with the new Melanated Mini Mona Lisa. A quick look at his Instagram page shows his life-like portraits of celebrities like Beyonce, Rihanna, Drake and the late Tupac Shakur.

He's also lent his talents to social justice with a poignant sketch called "The League." The image includes an angelic look at victims of unjust police killings like Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner, Sandra Bland, Samuel DuBose and Michael Brown.

Take a look at the adorable viral video and amazing work from Sketch below.

 

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Been a while, but I’ve been working 💪🏽 Had to trade the pencils in for the paint brushes. Learned a few new tricks, and relearned a few old ones. Now watch this . #2k19 🏆 #art #painting #artist #sketch #art_spotlight #paint #instaart #painter #artoftheday #arts_help #paintings #artwork

A post shared by Laurence Cheatham (@thisissketch) on Feb 20, 2019 at 9:37am PST

 

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Painting my daughter as Frida Kahlo 💐🙏🏽 House full of #art Photo credit @charliedrizzle #paint #fridakahlo #painter #canvasart #painting #artlife #canvas #artist #artwork #paintingoftheday #paintings #artistsoninstagram #instaart #artsy #arts #paintingwithatwist #artists

A post shared by Laurence Cheatham (@thisissketch) on Mar 14, 2019 at 2:32pm PDT

 

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#repost of my #pencildrawing of @iamcardib One of my favorite drawings I did this time last year. #cardib

A post shared by Laurence Cheatham (@thisissketch) on Mar 21, 2019 at 3:56pm PDT

 

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"The League" Please share this with your friends. I want to get this drawing out as far as it can go. Recently, I found a picture of this man holding this sign and it spoke to me. This drawing was inspired by the recent tragedy of Sandra Bland. I wanted to honor those who lost their lives and at the same time show that not everyone is racist and that we're not alone in this. Peace to Sandra Bland, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Samuel DuBose and the many others. Feel free to tag and share. #justice #sandrabland #ericgarner #samueldubose #trayvonmartin #michaelbrown #art #drawing #blacklivesmatter @caradelevingne

A post shared by Laurence Cheatham (@thisissketch) on Aug 11, 2015 at 7:01pm PDT

 

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Pencil work from last year #art #2pac #drawing #sketch @losangelesconfidential

A post shared by Laurence Cheatham (@thisissketch) on Dec 16, 2016 at 9:16pm PST

 

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Back to using pencils. #charliemurphy #art #arts_help #pencil #sketch #artist #artistsoninstagram #draw #drawing #artwork #artlife #sketching #sketchaday #drawingoftheday #artsy

A post shared by Laurence Cheatham (@thisissketch) on Apr 18, 2017 at 5:21pm PDT

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