Nicki Minaj Anaconda VMAs Twitter Rant
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“Anaconda” Was Not Nominated For Video Of The Year At The VMAs, And Nicki Minaj Is Not Pleased

Nicki Minaj takes to Twitter to express her displeasure with "Anaconda" not being nominated for Video of the Year at the 2015 VMAs.

Remember Nicki Minaj’s “Anaconda” video? Of course you do.

Yup, those bootylicious visuals for the rapstress’s on-wax nod to Sir Mix-A-Lot’s “Baby Got Back” rounded up the world’s attention by way of Nicki’s voluptuous backside. The nearly five-minute clip prompted a wave of parodies and memes, set a Vevo record for most views in 24 hours with 19.8 million, and still was not nominated for Video of the Year at the 2015 MTV Video Music Awards. And Barbie – you guessed it – is not pleased.

In a mini Twitter rant, Young Money’s first lady chalked MTV’s memory loss up to the fact that she’s a different “kind” of artist:

READ: And The 2015 MTV Video Music Award Nominees Are…

READ: 20 Questions About Nicki Minaj’s ‘Anaconda’ Video

At the height of its controversy, “Anaconda” raised eyebrows with the accompanying cover art and music video, and Nicki used a similar defense. Comparing the praise of the barely-there attire of Sports Illustrated models to her a**-tastic g-string photo, the rapper alluded to the unfair treatment of women of color with regards to nudity.

Does Nicki Minaj have a point? Was “Anaconda” worthy of that Video of the Year moonman?

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A Texas Woman Lived With Her Mother's Dead Body For Three Years

A Texas woman is facing two to 20 years in prison for living with her dead mother's body for three years.

According to CNN, Delissa Navonne Crayton's 71-year-old mother's corpse was found inside a room, while Crayton and her daughter dwelled in another room inside the home.

Investigators said Crayton's mother fell, hit her head and died a few days later. It appears as if the fall was accidental, however, Crayton's refusal to have her be seen by a doctor, assisted in her mother's death. A coroner's report

"From 2016 until July 7, 2019, approximately 3 years, Delissa Crayton resided in the residence with her daughter who was at the time under the age of 15," the Seguin Police Department said.

Crayton was arrested and charged with "Injury to a Child under the age of 15 through recklessly, by omission, causing to a child, serious mental deficiency, impairment or injury."

The second-degree felony also carries a $10,000 fine.

"This is an ongoing and active investigation being conducted by Seguin Police Department, the Texas Rangers, and the Guadalupe County Attorney's Office," the department said.

Police are expecting to level more charges against Crayton within the week.

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'The Lion King's' Florence Kasumba Teams Up With Bloomingdales For Glam Pop-Up

Inspired by the cinematic beauty of The Lion King, actress Florence Kasumba has curated a special pop-up with Bloomingdales featuring tribal threads and fits truly made for any fan of the celebrated film.

Announced by the retail giant last week, The Carousel @ Bloomingdale's: Style Kingdom celebrates the cultural significance of African fashion with pieces handpicked by Kasumba who voices Shenzie the hyena in the upcoming live-action film. The shop also features brands that empower communities with pieces sourced from multiple regions of the African continent as well as products featuring iconic characters and themes from the film.

"Being the guest curator for the Style Kingdom in The Carousel at Bloomingdale’s is an absolute thrill because I’ve been able to combine my love of fashion and film whilst connecting back to my African heritage,” Kasumba said in a press release. “I love how The Lion King can be interpreted through this new lens and connect with audiences in a unique and fresh way. I felt such a personal connection to the pieces I curated and I can’t wait for people to see the collections and the movie!”

African fashion labels to loom the shop from Florence's curation include, Maxhosa- a South African knitwear brand that celebrates Xhosa beadwork aesthetics made with the countries mohair and wool. Ghana-based line, Studio 189 and Nigerian menswear brand, Post-Imperial will also be featured.

While some pieces are gorgeous gowns and stunning earrings, there's also chill threads like graphic tees commemorating the film.

"One of our goals in collaborating with Disney to create Style Kingdom is to enable shoppers to experience the excitement and nostalgia of The Lion King in new ways. Florence's curation allows us to celebrate the film and African artistry while bringing inspiration and sense of discovery to our customers through a unique product mix, in-store events and visual moments," said Frank Berman, Bloomingdale's executive vice president and chief marketing officer.

Additional brands that empower communities will have items shipped from multiple regions of the African continent, that will also feature famed characters and themes from the film, the releases also stated.

Direct inspiration from the film will include pieces with familiar logos and color schemes. A Simba handbag, Pride Rock t-shirt, and a "The Circle of Life" water bottle will all be for purchase.

The Carousel @ Bloomingdale's: Style Kingdom will be open to the public from July 11th to September 2nd.

Check out the expansive collection here.

 

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Chiwetel Ejiofor Proves The Real Star Of The 'Lion King’ Is Actually The Villain

The bad guy makes the movie what it is. He tests the parameters of your empathy, understanding, and grace, forcing you to see what you’re made of.

This particular bad guy lets resentment fester and rumble in his belly, as his mighty and righteous brother merits admiration and reverence from faithful servants. When it comes to brains, he knows he has the lion's share, but it’s the permanent mark in the shape of a dagger slicing above his left eye that reminds him his brother is the sole proprietor of brute strength.

It's this same villain who deputizes himself among the others also tired of begging for whatever's left to orchestrate a felony so sorrowful, it plucks at your Adam’s Apple, pushing your screams and cries back into your throat because what’s done cannot be undone.

Chiwetel Ejiofor’s embodiment of the deceitful Scar is just that: a wondrous amalgamation of pain, defeat, rejection and will bursting onto the big screen in Disney’s live-action remake of the Lion King. Jeremy Irons’ 1994 version of the antagonist, while still deceptive, encapsulated a bit of theatrics and bounce. The only telltale sign of Scar’s venom was his flowing jet-black mane. Ejiofor’s 2019 portrayal is bloated with greed, anger and the need to control. The use of the word “bloated” is hyperbole, of course, as on-screen Scar is thin, almost emaciated and physically hungry for the dominance he feels he’s owed.

There’s no need to rehash the 25-year-old film. Moviegoers can be reassured to know director Jon Favreau stayed true to the movie’s heart. He often replicated important scenes detail for detail, including the quintessential opening sequence with the sun rising over the Pride Lands as zebras, antelope, rhinos and other wildlife assembled to meet and bow to the future king.

And while we know Mufasa dies, his live-action death stings even more.

As Hans Zimmer’s “To Die For” thunders, the wildebeest come running down into the gorge and your 10-year-old self tells Simba to run. Hope is still a possibility after Mufasa saves his cub and leaps from the stampede onto the rocks and climbs to the top. Then your 34-year-old self soothes your inner child, because what happens next—the grave offense Scar commits—is irreversible.

But what most miss about Scar, even after 25 years, is under all of his deplorable ways lies his one admirable quality: ambition.

Scar saw himself among the greats and envisioned a kingdom under his rule. He let nothing get in the way of his chosen destiny, including his weak older brother. Scar couldn’t and wouldn’t settle for being a knight, or a duke or a lord. Scar wanted to be king, so much so betrayal and murder were mere casualties in the race to rule Pride Rock.

Who among us has ever gone after our future with more reckless abandon?

Ejiofor understood this insatiable need to ascend to the greatness Scar believed he possessed, and he channeled that with his voice. The east-London native’s lilt took on whatever emotions needed to give way to Scar's true intentions.

Whether it be the flat, emotionless way he dismissed Simba into the den. (“I don’t babysit,” he sneers) or the way he let his words dangle in the air as he covertly described life as Mufasa's brother ("Others spend their lives in the dark...begging for scraps"), Ejiofor’s reinvention of Scar is more than just a voice over. It’s the inflated and arguably updated blueprint Irons left behind.

Ejiofor showed that to embody Scar meant more than reciting lines from a page. It meant whatever couldn’t be expressed through physical emotion seen on screen had to be demonstrated in the inflections, whispers, and passion of his voice. Scar’s lustful desire to outshine his brother and his brother’s memory was on full display whenever Scar was on screen and Ejiofor zeroed in on that, even from behind a microphone.

With fervor, and indignation Ejiofor’s portrayal of Scar proved why, without him, Simba would be nothing. Without Scar, Simba wouldn’t have to face his biggest foe or know how to. While Mufasa taught him compassion, loyalty, and love, Scar taught him to fight. Scar is a liar and a cheat and will stop at nothing to get what he feels rightfully belongs to him. And yet, as vile as Scar is, he's also the unintended teacher.

Ejiofor knew that deeper than his fury and his jealousy, Scar was more than just a bad guy. Scar was an instructor who made Simba and audiences examine themselves and Ejiofor’s performance underscores that. Does it feel good to give Scar his flowers? Of course not. I wouldn't spit on Scar even if he were on fire. But let’s face it, there would be no Lion King if Simba didn’t have to fight for his throne.

So to Scar and to all the bad guys who help us roar a little bit louder, thank you for the unintended lesson.

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