Obama GQ Cover 2015 Obama GQ Cover 2015
Obama GQ Cover 2015
GQ

7 Things We Learned From President Obama’s GQ ‘Men Of The Year’ 20th Anniversary Cover Story

In GQ’s “Men of The Year” 20th anniversary issue, Barack Obama compares himself to sports figures when it comes to this whole “President of the United States” thing. Take Green Bay Packers quarterback, Aaron Rodgers, for instance, with whom he shares the ability to avoid “getting flustered in what’s around me.” Or NBA legend Michael Jordan, who embodies how to “to be in the moment, make the best decision you can, know that you’re going to get a bunch of them right, but a bunch of times you’re also not going to get it exactly the way you want it.”

All suited up and heading into his final minutes of the game, President Obama is more relaxed than ever (take his recent use of the term “pop off” for example). Owning his newly-displayed hold on the job of the “leader of the free world,” Obama chopped it up with Grantland founder Bill Simmons about his early days, what he has learned, his family, and all things in between. Reading like a robust discussion between old friends, Obama and Simmons swerve in and out of the heavy stuff, accenting the conversation with candid exchanges.

Though Simmons noted that President Obama was “measured,” the 44th POTUS still managed to answer a few telling questions. Peep seven things we learned from his latest GQ cover.

What he would tell himself back in 2008 before he became president:
“I would probably tell myself to communicate more effectively early on than I did,” “One thing I learned through some tough election cycles: You can’t separate good policy from the need to bring the American people along and make sure that they know why you’re doing what you’re doing.”

The only people he would pick up the phone for during a date with the First Lady:
"Malia and Sasha. [laughs] And maybe my mother-in-law. My national security adviser, Susan Rice, and Denis McDonough, my chief of staff. Those are the only people whose call I would take during a date night with Michelle."

Why he feels more confident towards the end of his second term:
"There’s no doubt that the longer I’m in this job, the more confident I am about the decisions I’m making and more knowledgeable about the responses I can expect. And as a consequence, you end up being looser. There’s not much I have not seen at this point, and I know what to expect, and I can anticipate more than I did before. [...] It’s a combination of me feeling looser because I’ve just been in this job a long time and have gone through some tough stretches. Not only do you not look like you have any fear, but you actually don’t have any fear. And I don’t at this point. The bets we made early on have paid off. Some of it does have to do with luck."

The worst moments of his presidency:
Think about 2013, right after I’d been re-elected: Our goal was to lead with a big push on immigration reform. And then, before the second inauguration has even happened, [the school shooting at] Sandy Hook happens. Which remains, by the way, the worst few days of my presidency. I went up and visited with those families and—you know, Bill, you’ve still got small kids. These are 6-year-olds, right? And you have 20 of them who’ve been massacred.

Why his response to Ferguson was different than his response Trayvon Martin:
"When the Trayvon Martin case happened, I had an honest response as a father that I think resonated with a lot of people. When Ferguson happened, there was a gap between how quickly we could pull together a police task force, recommendations. And so in that lag, it feels as if I haven’t spoken to the moment as effectively. I suspect that if I were to do it over again, there might be something I could say that would’ve crystallized it more effectively. But Ferguson—the case itself was tougher because people didn’t know what was going on exactly. In some ways the [Eric] Garner case in New York was clearer because you had on videotape exactly what had happened, and some of the subsequent cases have been more obvious."

Michelle Obama’s thoughts on him being president for longer than eight years:
"Anybody who thinks I could get away with telling Michelle I’m going to be president any longer than eight years does not know my wife."

His thoughts on if he got to run against Trump:
"I would’ve enjoyed campaigning against Trump. That would’ve been fun."

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John Singleton In Coma After Suffering From A Stroke

John Singleton is reportedly in a coma after suffering from a major stroke, TMZ reports.

The Boyz N the Hood filmmaker has reportedly been in the ICU since last weekend. According to legal documents obtained by TMZ, Singleton's mother, Sheila Ward, is asking a judge to appoint her temporary conservator of his work because he is "unable to properly provide for his personal needs for physical health, food, clothing, or shelter." Singleton was reportedly working on several projects and preparing to sign a lucrative settlement agreement at the time of his stroke, according to Ward.

As previously reported, Singleton suffered a stroke on April 17, after returning from Costa Rica. After experiencing problems with his legs, he reportedly checked into Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles where he suffered a stroke in his hospital room.

This story is developing.

 

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Goodbye Costa Rica... one of my new favorite places in the world.... so much to see so little time...

A post shared by JOHN SINGLETON (@johnsingleton) on Mar 6, 2019 at 1:07pm PST

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Bun B's Lawyer Provides Update On Attempted Armed Robbery Aftermath

On Tuesday (April 24), Bun B confronted an armed robber, who was later identified as 20-year-old DeMonte Jackson. The latter attempted to rob the legendary rapper's home but acted swiftly with his own registered firearm. When Bun B's wife, Angela "Queenie" Walls answered a knock on the door, a masked Freeman entered with his weapon but was later met with the Trill rapper's fire and was detained at a hospital while being treated for his wounds.

In a statement provided to XXL, lawyer Charles Adams said he doesn't expect charges to be filed against the Texas native. "In Texas, you can defend your home. And if an armed home invader breaks into your home and puts a gun at your wife's head, you can shoot the guy if he's still in your home," Adams said. "Honestly, this might sound cheesy, thank God that Bun had a gun. Thank God that he was courageous enough to defend his home and his wife [Queenie]. And thank God Queenie was courageous enough to not let the man go upstairs."

As Queenie led Jackson to the garage, Bun B, born Bernard Freeman, became aware of the incident from another part of the house and opened fire on Jackson. The latter was charged with one count of burglary plus two levies of aggravated robbery.

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Former Felons May Have To Pay Court Fines Before Voting In Florida

Florida made history when it passed Amendment 4 restoring voting rights to the state's nearly one million former felons.

However, on Wednesday (April 24) the GOP-House passed a bill that would require former felons to pay court fees, fine,s and restitution prior to voting. The Senate bill requires that just restitution be paid. If this measure is passed it could prohibit thousands of ex-cons from being able to vote.

The state reportedly also doesn't have a method to properly tally restitution and to create a system could cost millions. On Wednesday, the House considered a proposal by the Senate that would allot $2 million to hire more workers at the Florida Commission on Offender Review to review the applications of former felons.

That commission would then report their findings to local supervisors of elections.

“Obviously, the individual is responsible for determining whether they’ve completed all the terms of their own sentence,” Sen. Jeff Brandes “If they have questions, they should go to local supervisors of elections.”

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