kevin abstract

Kevin Abstract Makes It Known He's An Artist With Something To Say In Self-Directed "Empty" Video

Press play. 

It's rare to discover a full-fledged artist but Kevin Abstract, the frontman of hip-hop boyband Brockhampton, is just that.

After releasing his acclaimed debut album MTV1987 in 2014, the 20-year-old has returned with a new song entitled "Empty," which also has been paired with a cinematic visual he directed. With his suburban Texas upbringing serving as Anytown, USA, he captures his Gen Y life with lyrics like "I hate my yearbook photo/ I hate my passport/ I hate my last name/I hate everything it stands for."

For the visual, Abstract also teamed up with Michael Uzowuru, who has worked with the likes of Frank Ocean, Earl Sweatshirt and Vince Staples.

With "Empty" being  just a first taste of his forthcoming album American Boyfriend: A Suburban Love Story, it's a great indicator of the greatness to come from Abstract whose uncompromising point of view speaks volumes.

 

 

From the Web

More on Vibe

Boosie Badazz Represents The Bottom Of Baton Rouge, La. In "Southside Baby" Video

Boosie Badazz is coming off the release of Bad Azz Zay, a project produced entirely by Zaytoven. As Badazz' life goes, the "Wipe me Down" rapper is in the studio prepping his next album, Talk that Shit.

To get the ball rolling on the his forthcoming project, the Baton Rouge native released the music visuals for "Southside Baby," a nod to his old neighborhood, which is known as The Bottom.

As the camera pans everyday hood life of dice games, old timers providing laughs with their dancing, and frolic little kids who do not understand that they are poor, Boosie raps:

"Know you heard about that Dirty South Know you heard about we ain't gon' talk, we shoot it out/Know you heard about that trap life, them cold and black nights/And all my n***as that ain't get to make it out."

A couple weeks ago, Boosie joined forces with ATL's Trouble for their collaboration on "Ain't My Fault," a single that samples Silkk the Shocker's 1998 cut "It Ain't My Fault" featuring Mystikal.

Watch the video above.

 

Continue Reading

Ride Through Queensburg Projects With Bo Trill In "Queensburg Baby" Video

To so many young black men and women, hip-hop is much more than entertainment. Hip-hop is real life; the guns, violence, sex, drug sales, drug addiction, and bravado. Too many of us black men are so hurt, frustrated and disconnected from society that we need something, anything to hold on to. And for us, hip-hop is the one thing that we can own and connect to.

Today (Nov. 12), I ran across a video titled "Queensburg Baby" by Bo Trill. Trill, a rapper from the Laurel, MS., which is also my hometown, follows the well-worn path of spitting lyrics about hustling, gun-play and bagging someone's girl. Nothing is wrong with this. And if you know me, then you know how much I enjoy gangsta music, accurate gangsta music. Hip-hop comes from the streets, and unfortunately many of us black and latino men understanding is rooted in street politics and language. So much of what I know about life comes from the streets; the streets of Laurel.

With Unoski TV working the camera lens, viewers get a glimpse of these, well, Queensburg babies (no pun intended). QB is a small section in South Laurel. Here, in these grimy visuals, seeing these QB shorties brandishing guns bigger that are Lil Bow Bow, I was damn near moved to tears. From my 31st floor office in Times Square, I watched Bo Trill's "Queensburg Baby," looking at the faces of these young men, I literally remembered the countless nights, and days that I sold crack, cocaine and pills with some of these guys family members. Their OG's are my homies.

Seeing Bo Trill and his fellow-Queensburg Babies, as well as their aggression, machoism, their honest ignorance, and the urgency to trap dollars, and desperately hold on to something in this white man's world, I feel that shit. I totally understand everything about these Queensburg babies. They are from the city that sent me to prison.

I'll probably get in trouble for this post in the morning, but I'm from the streets of Laurel, trouble is what I do. I'll accept whatever trouble follows, if any, because what Bo Trill has to say, and what he doesn't have to language to say it, is just as important as what Kendrick Lamar and J.Cole has to say. And, I'm in a position to give a voice to the voiceless.  And more importantly, once the homies in Laurel see this video on Vibe.com, this small, what's a small feat to many, is big for my city, and just one more thing that we, Laurel babies have to hold on to.

Watch "Queensburg Baby" above.

Rest easy Justin "Muncy" Mack, and major salute to my OG, Larry Locc.

.

Continue Reading

Come To Yonkers With Styles P In "Brand New" Video

Styles P is coming off the release of his S.P. The Goat: The Ghost of all Time. The veteran rhyme-slinger is still putting in work.

After recently dropping a loosie titled, "Brand New," the L.O.X. member unveiled the song's video. Shot by Benjie Filmz, SP the Ghost takes us past Uptown to the Yonkers. Keeping to his usual g-code, the rapper born David Styles shares rules to manhood and moral guidance, while reminding you that he'll still catch a fade with anyone willing to indulge.

Last year, after the release of his G-Host album, Styles P spoke to us about dealing with his aggressive persona.

"So, I always had the idea, before I even thought I could make it rapping, my shit was: 'how am I going to get this bread? 'How am I going to get to this next block?' It's that kind of mentality that gives you a warrior mentality. I gotta do what I gotta do--I’ll light this shit off, or I’ll poke this man. I’ll do whatever I gotta do to survive. But you have to learn that doesn’t make you more of a man. It doesn’t make you less of a man. It’s an aspect that you have to deal with."

"It’s exhausting. It’s too exhausting," Styles said about always being aggressive. "Going over there with my strap,  getting my other strap. What the fu*k am I doing? I have kids. I have a home. Why am I even going to this place if I got to go like that? Enjoy your freedom, enjoy the air, enjoy money, enjoy family, enjoy just fu*king being able to not worry. I used to hate not having a gun on me. For years, I’ve never not had two guns on me. That sh*t was wearing me down--mentally. And it even starts to attract energy you don't need."

Watch the video above.

Continue Reading

Top Stories