Barack Obama Barack Obama
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There's Nothing Wrong With Wearing The Same Tux To Every Event, Just Ask Barack Obama

For the past eight years—you know, not including president 45—we've ogled at the physical look of the First Family with open mouths, especially when they've had to doll up for galas, dinners and other black-tie events. If we take a moment to be honest with ourselves, though, we were primarily focusing our attention on the ladies: Michelle Obama and her daughters Sasha and Malia.

Their elegance was unmatched when it came to shutting down red carpets, donning gowns and accessories from prestigious designers like Versace and Givenchy to Jason Wu and Thom Browne. But what about President Obama? While his tuxedo probably was woven from the finest of threads, Mrs. Obama spilled a little bit of tea about her husband's wardrobe and fashion hack.

“This is the unfair thing—you talk about Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers—no matter what we do, he puts on that same tux,” she said at Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference on Tuesday (June 6). “Now, people take pictures of the shoes I wear, the bracelets, the necklace—they didn’t comment that for eight years he wore the same tux, same shoes.”

She said he was proud of it, too, and would tease her about how long it took for him to get ready versus her routine. That's called getting your money's worth. And now that he's added the word "former" to his title, Obama has the freedom to switch up his sartorial situation as frequently (or infrequently) as he wants to.

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It's Official: Joe Biden Announces 2020 Presidential Bid

After months of speculation and hints, former Vice President Joe Biden officially announced his bid for a 2020 presidency.

In a video announcing his run which was released on Thursday (April 25), Biden states that he wants to fix the issues in the country. What inspired him to run was Donald Trump’s response to the deadly 2017 white supremacist protest in Charlottesville, Va.

"In that moment, I knew the threat to this nation was unlike any I had ever seen in my lifetime," Biden says. The 76-year-old is also a former Delaware senator.

"I believe history will look back on four years of [Trump] and all he embraces as an aberrant moment in time," he continues in the video. "But if we give Donald Trump eight years in the White House, he will forever and fundamentally alter the character of this nation — who we are — and I cannot stand by and watch that happen."

In 2015, Biden stated that he would not be running for President, as he wanted to focus on healing from the loss of his son, Beau, to cancer. However, NPR reports that his family–especially his grandchildren– have “prodded” him to run.

He joins Kamala Harris, Cory Booker, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren as politicians who have thrown their hat into the ring for a Democratic nomination.

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Ugandan Man Becomes A Lawyer To Win Back Father's Land

When Jordyn Kinyera was 6 years old, his father lost his land after being sued by neighbors. At the time, his father was retired and didn't have many resources to fight the case.

For two decades, the case dragged on in court. However, on Monday (April 1) a Ugandan court delivered a final judgment in favor of Kinyera's father, thanks to Kinyera himself.

Speaking to the BBC Kinyera said seeing his father's legal woes inspired him to become a lawyer.

"I made the decision to become a lawyer later in life but much of it was inspired by events I grew up witnessing, the circumstances and frustrations my family went through during the trial and how it affected us," Kinyera said.

It took Kinyera 18 years to receive the education needed to become a lawyer. Yet despite how long it took for him to legally win the land back, he's happy.

"Justice delayed is justice denied. My father is 82 years and he can't do much with the land now. It's up to us children to pick up from where he left."

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Lori Lightfoot Becomes Chicago’s First Black Female Mayor

Lori Lightfoot scored a historic win in Chicago's mayoral race. The 56-year-old former federal prosecutor became the Windy City’s first black female mayor Tuesday (April 2), as well as the city’s first lesbian major.

According to the Chicago Tribune, Lightfoot, pulled into the lead grabbing 74% of the vote against her opponent Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle.

“Thank you, Chicago. From the bottom of my heart, thank you,” Lightfoot said in her acceptance speech. “Today, you did more than make history. You created a movement for change.”

Thank you, Chicago! pic.twitter.com/IimreRoBff

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“When we started this journey 11 months ago, nobody gave us much of a chance,” she continued. “We were up against powerful interests, a powerful machine, and a powerful Mayor. But I remembered something Martin Luther King said when I was very young. Faith, he said, is taking the first step even when you can’t see the whole staircase.

“We couldn’t see the whole staircase when we started this journey, but we had faith—an abiding faith in this city, in its people, and in its future.”

Lightfoot also vowed to break the city's “endless cycle of corruption,” and work to make Chicago “thriving, prosperous, better, stronger, fairer -- for everyone.”

Preckwinkle, a  72-year-old former teacher, leader of the city's Democratic Party and former City Council Member, congratulated Lightfoot on her victory and thanked supporters.  “It has been amazing meeting supporters from across the city, hearing your stories and sharing our vision for the future of Chicago,” she tweeted.

Chicago, which is the nation’s third-largest city, elected Harold Washington as its first black mayor in 1983. Lightfoot is now only the third black mayor to be elected in the city, and the second female mayor.

Lightfoot will be sworn in on May 20. Read her speech below.

“Thank you, Chicago. From the bottom of my heart, thank you. Today, you did more than make history. You created a movement for change.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“When we started this journey 11 months ago, nobody gave us much of a chance. We were up against powerful interests, a powerful machine, and a powerful Mayor.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

 

“But I remembered something Martin Luther King said when I was very young. Faith, he said, is taking the first step even when you can’t see the whole staircase.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“We couldn’t see the whole staircase when we started this journey, but we had faith—an abiding faith in this city, in its people, and in its future.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“We still have faith, we still are determined, and with this mandate for change, now we’re going to take the next steps together.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“Together we can and will finally put the interests of our people—all of our people—ahead of the interests of a powerful few. Together we can and will make Chicago a place where your zipcode doesn’t determine your destiny.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“We can and we will give our neighborhoods—all of our neighborhoods—the same time and attention that we give to the downtown. We can and will make sure our neighborhoods and our neighbors—all of our neighbors—are invested in each other.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“We can and we will break this city’s endless cycle of corruption, and never again allow politicians to profit from their elected positions.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“Together we can and will remake Chicago. Thriving, prosperous, better, stronger, fairer—for everyone.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

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