Bebe Rexha And Lil Wayne Dance The Day Away In "The Way I Are" (Video)

Guys, Bebe and Weezy just want to dance with somebody. 

Bebe Rexha and Lil Wayne spread their joy with the world in a cheerful new video for their new single, "The Way I Are (Dance With Somebody)."

The Brooklyn-born singer's new hit samples Whitney Houston's "I Wanna Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me)" continues the mantra of the upbeat jam. Rexha falls in line with dancers of different ethnicities throughout the video, and Tunechi serves up a verse followed by a little auto-tuned vocalizing.

Hit play above, and get your groove on.

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Brando

NEXT: Emotional Oranges Sing Tales Of Modern Love Behind Mysterious Blinds

As of late, New York’s Brooklyn Steel has acted as a safe space for budding performers of the R&B flavor to bring live music to the fans. On a brisk fall evening, fans of Emotional Oranges follow stickers that act as breadcrumbs to the venue. It’s a perfect treat for them given the anonymous nature of the presumed duo. Singles like the flirtatious “Motion” and “Personal” not only offer reasons to slide to the dance floor but an ode to their ability to marry disco blends, instrumental productions, and 808s, resulting in a very special cocktail of modern R&B.

When members known as "A" and "V" take the stage in front of the sold-out crowd, they’re imaginative in every way. The venue turns into a mood ring of sorts as their silhouettes are met with lavender hues during “Built That Way,” blue for “Your Best Friend Is A Hater” and a somber red for “Corners of My Mind.” They may be a wonder, but the stories heard on the aforementioned tracks reflect the ins and outs of modern love. Ins being the adrenaline of meeting someone new in a two-star bar and the outs being the situationship that follows it. Fantasies of what love should be and reflections of what it could have been flooding the Emotional Oranges' debut project The Juice Vol. 1, giving listeners honest storytelling. It’s something producer/engineer “A” and female vocalist “V” pride themselves on.

“I think a lot of our music stems from real experience, not just other people’s stories, but our lives as well,” V says a few moons later in the VIBE office. Their most daring songs like “Hold You Back,” a back and forth about a woman falling for another girl while in relations with a guy came from a simple conversation between the two. “Hold You Back” as well as songs from their newly released follow-up, The Juice Vol. 2 aren’t built for the radio or a speakeasy, but for listeners who enjoy a bit of spritz in their R&B.

“It goes back to the expectations,” A says. “People get in the studio and it's a writer setup with another writer. The expectation is a song for the club, or a deep song or something for the “quintessential” album, but with us, there's none of that.”

Due to their anonymity, Emotional Oranges don’t worry about playing up their personality or staying in a sound bubble. Their mysterious allure comes with creative freedom. “I think it actually helps us do things faster,” V continues. “Vol. 2 was written in two weeks. A lot of the production takes 5, 6, 7 months, but in terms of ideation that process was super fast.”

The Juice Vol. 2 continues to toy with their style of intentional R&B; songs like “Don’t Be Lazy” jump right to the punch. “Let me lick and taste it,” the two sing with other tracks like “West Coast Love” pays homage to East Coast legends A Tribe Called Quest’s 1990 jam, “Can I Kick It.” There’s also “Iconic,” that toys with the sounds of Miami’s 90s underground. Produced by Dante Jones of THEY., the track aligns with the Los Angeles-based duo's mission of keeping their music free-flowing.

A and V of Emotional Oranges came to be in 2017 but the group moved as a collective comprised of “normal people” in 2015. Those people included songwriters and producers, leading many to wonder just who made up the group. Speaking to Noisey earlier this year, EO shared how their debut single “Motion” doesn’t feature V, but another vocalist. "If you listen real carefully, on our first single ‘Motion,’ that’s our first singer. She's an A&R at a big label. The rest of the songs are our new singer," they said at the time. “We've all worked regular jobs. We're very regular people. And we came together for one unified vision. I tried a lot of things in my life that didn't work. I tried to put so many things together. It just came down to authenticity.” Some of the things that didn’t work were trying to bend towards a label's passive-aggressive suggestions.

“When you have labels telling you who you are as an artist, that doesn't work,” A says. “It might work for a song but not for the longevity of your career.” He also shared how artists should be mindful of the relationships they have with a label, a notion that might not be on the mind of a green artist. “It's not the idea of a label it’s the idea of someone telling you that you have to compromise your integrity in order to get to the next level, you have to eliminate that and eliminate the expectations of it to make money off of this tomorrow,” he says.“But for us, I think it's very liberating. We’re releasing music we love and not being given a deadline or told what to wear. To free yourself from all these things has been the most liberating for us.”

With their loyal and true fan base known as the “citrus squad,” Emotional Oranges got to experience just how deep their influence has been. Their fan merch with the simple words “emotional” across the right side of their tees and sweatshirts were later seen in the stores of Forever 21 without any credit. “I take it as a compliment,” V says. “They always copy what’s hot.”

Merch:

 

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- 🧡 Emotional Oranges 🧡 🍊 9/14/19 🍊 Tags: #emo #grunge #makeup #edgy #emomakeup #grungemakeup #dark #aesthetic #tumblr #tumblraesthetic #outfits #black #bandtees #rock #music #skinnyjeans #selfie #mirrorselfie #smokeyeye #eyeliner #alternative #alternativeaesthetic #sad #dark #nepali #canadian #explore #explorepage #emotionaloranges #chiiild @hellochiiild @emotionaloranges

A post shared by Rae 🏳️‍🌈 (@x_raepanda_x) on Sep 17, 2019 at 3:07pm PDT

Forever 21:

They’re also one of the artists who provide a phone number for their fans. It’s not a way of funneling data for EO, but instead, a way for them to get to know their squad. “Even at the shows, they’ll come backstage and tell us their names. One time, there were four different couples in Toronto who bought meet and greet tickets twice," V recalls. "They spent $150 each twice in three months. They all said, ‘Do you remember us?’ and it’s like, ‘Of course!’ Moments like that have been great.”

“They’ll also tell their family members to come to shows,” V adds while asking A about a Texas-based fan who shared his love for EO with his twin sister from Durham. That curious person then became a fan, stretching the Emotional Oranges family a little further.

As their music continues to reach lovers of soul and today’s modern R&B, Emotional Oranges are holding on to the elements that actually matter. From storytelling, funky beats and universal perspectives, they have a gift of making it all work. “I think we haven't pigeon-holed ourselves, or put ourselves in a box,” V ironically says as she toys with an orange from our snack area. “I think we kind of live outside the box. We can really play, which I think is fun since where we go from here is up to us.”

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Emma McIntyre

Anderson .Paak Talks Homelessness, Modelo Partnership And ‘Oxnard’ Criticism

Any fan of Anderson .Paak knows that despite revered, Grammy-nominated albums like his breakout 2016 album Malibu and his 2019 LP Ventura, you haven’t truly experienced his music until you’ve seen him live. When he’s performing with his band the Free Nationals, he’s truly in his element: his vocals are electric, he easily transitions from belting on the microphone at front stage to delivering drum solos in the back, and you can see his wide, toothy smile from anywhere in the audience. And whenever the Oxnard, Calif. native takes the stage, he never forgets the life circumstances he’s escaped and survived.

Over the next week, the multitalented musician is teaming with Modelo and the International Rescue Committee for their Fighting Chance concert series. .Paak will perform in three benefit shows in San Francisco (Nov. 13), Atlanta (Nov. 15), and Brooklyn (Nov. 17) to aid refugees, immigrants, and people in need – all issues that the singer/rapper has personal connection with. VIBE spoke to Anderson .Paak about homelessness, music’s greatest beggars, criticism of his album Oxnard, and new music with Chance The Rapper and the Free Nationals.

VIBE: Tell me about this new partnership with Modelo.

Anderson .Paak: Really excited to be partnering with Modelo and International Rescue Committee. Modelo and the IRC are providing a fighting chance for immigrants, for refugees and Americans, so they can be great out here when it comes to all over the world. I’m happy to be linking up with them because I share a similar story. There was a time when I didn’t have much and I didn’t have a place to stay, and all I wanted to do was the music but I didn’t have the resources. A lot of people lended a hand so that I could have that bridge, and I see Modelo is trying to do the same. So I’m hyped about what we’re doing with these benefit shows – one in Brooklyn, one in Atlanta, one in San Francisco – for the cause.

 

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Everyone deserves a fighting chance. Learn how you can help @ModeloUSA, @iheartradio, @RESCUEorg in supporting refugees, immigrants and Americans in need. Visit ModeloUSA.com/fightingchanceconcert for more. #ModeloFightingChance #Ad #For21+

A post shared by Andy (@anderson._paak) on Nov 8, 2019 at 11:28am PST

What’s the backstory behind when you were homeless?

Right when my wife was pregnant with my first son, Soul, I was doing cover gigs, gigs here and there, playing for other artists. I was working on weed farms and doing all kinds of crazy stuff. Right when that happened, I wanted to fully commit to the music thing. But at the same time, that’s when I moved out of my sister’s spot, she couldn’t afford to have us there anymore. It was a key time where I was floating around, didn’t have a spot to stay. We were finishing up the first project, and I was working with people like Sa-Ra, really working closely with my boy Shafiq Husayn, and working closely with my boy Dumbfoundead. These are people who offered up their couches, their studios, their places to me and my family while I got things together. It was vital, it helped me get to the next phase of my career. If I didn’t have that, I probably would’ve devoted my energy to making ends meet, and Lord knows what kind of things you can get into when you’re trying to make money. But I got to focus on my passion, and everything followed after that.

Sitting down with Modelo, I got to talk to some of the people they’re working with. Hearing their stories, I saw that common thread and I related to that. Even for someone coming from Mexico, someone coming from Africa, I could see people being out there and not having resources. To have any sort of help is important and makes a difference.

Many people reading this may not have dealt with homelessness personally. What do you think is something about homelessness that people can’t truly understand until they’ve been there?

Not everybody starts off homeless. You eventually get to that place. Someone may have a passion. One thing leads to another, he doesn’t have the resources, and he doesn’t have someone to help him get out of that hole. Anything can happen. People get removed and they get numb to the fact and forget that so easily that could be them. Or if they want to start something in a whole different territory, but they don’t have any family out there or nothing. A lot of people can relate to that. I think people being numb to that is where the problem is. They think they can’t relate because they see someone who’s literally homeless in the street. But it’s getting away from that. It’s being able to connect with that person and knowing that if you have something to offer, then there’s no reason not to offer that up because you get what you give. They’re at that point of homelessness, and that’s when people go towards acts of crime to help feed themselves. It doesn’t have to get to that point.

Has growing up in California given more perspective when it comes to immigrants?

Absolutely. It’s a part of my whole story, even going back from my mom being from Korea, adopted by black Americans who were out here in the ‘50s. She had no clue of her original family. She starts her own produce business, which is built on immigrants, Mexican workers who are going out there and making millions for companies that have to have their produce all the time. That’s what I came up on. That’s my moms. Then meeting my wife, she comes out here and she wants to be a musician, so she has to get residency permits and she comes out here with no family, she meets me and we start a family. That brings me back to my culture that I never knew. So it’s incredible, very near and dear.

 

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You and a friend could win a trip to catch my Modelo Fighting Chance show in NYC, Sunday, 11/17 at Brooklyn Steel. Enter for your chance to win at iheartradio.com/modelo #ModeloFightingChance #Ad, #For21+

A post shared by Andy (@anderson._paak) on Oct 16, 2019 at 1:43pm PDT

On Ventura, the song “Come Home,” you said, “no one even begs anymore.” Who are the all-time greatest beggars in music?

Oooh, the all-time greatest beggars. You’ve got Lenny Williams. “Oooh, oh oh oh oh.” K-Ci and JoJo? “Baby I want you back.” You’ve got groups: Boyz II Men, The Delfonics, The Temptations, Dru Hill. Even Bruno, he gets in his begging bag, catching grenades for girls and stuff. He’s probably the biggest one, he topped the charts with that one. (laughs)

I was thinking of Keith Sweat. He be begging, man.

(imitates Keith Sweat singing “Twisted”) “Baby baby, I know!”

If you had to make a Mount Rushmore of R&B and soul singers, who would be on it?

I’d do Stevie Wonder, I’d do Ray Charles. I’d do Prince. I’d do Aretha Franklin. Sh*t! It’s just four? (revisits the list) Yeah, everybody’s represented.

You had a really strong start with your first several albums. Malibu, Venice, NxWorries. Oxnard wasn’t as well received by critics. Did that criticism impact you while making Ventura?

Says who?! Nah, it was good. It was part of the grand scheme of things. People have their expectations that I would never be able to reach after Malibu, and it’s a blessing to be able to say that. I never thought Malibu would be received the way it was. It took us all around the world, it changed our lives. Going into the next project was rough because like, we’re touring now, I’m always making music but I’m making the music I want to do and I’m not necessarily trying to let the fans dictate where I go. As an artist, I have to figure out how I’m going to take them with me; that was the point of the beaches thing. But these different things were happening in my life at the same time as Oxnard. I never was thinking about first week sales or being on Billboard; all these things were kind of new. This was my first debut with Dre where all these things were becoming factors now. I thought it was great. It gave me something else to achieve. But I knew it was going to be this kind of thing where, “he’ll never be able to live up to (the previous album),” I could feel that energy. So I was like, I’m going to make sure I have two albums ready because Kanye and all these dudes have their big album and everyone wants to put them in this box. At that point, as an artist, there’s a big thing you have to do where you go against the grain. F**k em. Some people just fall in and see what they’re good at, and repeat it. Some people can do that, but I’m not really like that. I like to do different things.

I did two albums: I’m going to have Oxnard, that’s what I wanted to do. I’m the same man, new car, having fun, action-packed. I’m really working with Dre, not just talking; Dre’s involved in everything from the production to the mix to the art. I’m going to have another album that I feel like is a mix of where I should be going and what people want from me. If I have to do something in the parameter of making it beautiful and something I can play with the Obamas, my mom, with the hood people, and the nerd people, I’m going to have it ready to go, but I want to be able to do these at the same time. That didn’t become clear to me until I was making Oxnard and working so closely with Dre. I need to have this ready as well, and it’s going to be a perfect balance.

I also wasn’t used to taking criticism, really. You put out stuff, and people love everything you put out. Then you try to do something different. People were taking jabs at it. Like, wow. But at the same time, it was my biggest Billboard charting joint. (Ed. note: Oxnard debuted at no. 11 on the Billboard 200, his highest at that time of his career; his follow-up, Ventura, debuted at no. 10.) My biggest first week ever. You can’t have one without the other, I realized. That was a big learning experience, too. If they hate, let them hate and let the money pile up, like 50 Cent said.

I actually enjoyed Oxnard, but I still had that question.

It’s crazy how a handful of people can skew an artist. Artists are so close to their fan base now than ever before. There’s pros and cons with that. If people don’t like it, that makes artists feel like it’s complete trash. A lot of people still f**k with it, and some people don’t. That was my first album where I had that energy, where people felt so passionate on either side. That’s striking a nerve.

You were recently on Rhythm + Flow with Chance The Rapper. What was that experience like? Also, I read that you guys were working on other records aside from the show. When can we hear those records?

Rhythm + Flow was fun, to be in front of hungry musicians and young artists. I always love doing that. They were taking advice, they were all really respectful, and it made me appreciative that I can have a career like this where people even see me as worthy of giving advice. Chance, we got a lot of records, but he’s obsessed with video games and stuff. I hope he puts some of that stuff out sometime. But if he keeps inviting me to Netflix, I’m there, too. I’m still pissed I didn’t get to meet Cardi that day. It was fun experiencing that with the new kids out there.

You said that hopefully Chance can put out that music you guys made. Why can’t you?

He better! But I’ve got enough problems. I’m putting out the Free Nationals [album]. They’re a pain in the a**, but they’ve got some great music. You would never think individuals as rowdy as them would put out such sophisticated music, but that’s the beauty of it, it’s a contrast. We’re gearing up for that

What’s the story behind the Free Nationals?

They’ve been my band since day one. The core of it was me, Jose Rios, and Ron Tnava Avant. We used to play cover gigs, then they started playing my original music, and the band started to grow from there with Kelsey Gonzalez, Callum Connor. They’ve been part of my production since Venice, since before that. Now they’ve ventured off and wrote their own album together, and some great artists have been involved with it: Syd, my brother Mac Miller, Kadhja Bonet, they dropped a single with J.I.D. It’s dope man, they’re finally done with the project so I’m excited to be able to help with it.

How did you figure out who you wanted in the band and settle upon a group you were happy with?

There was a time where all of us were just coming up and playing together. Before we were doing big shows we just liked to be around each other, link up and play. No one had to tell us to link, we just would do it all the time. That’s how you kind of know. Years go by, and it’s just the same dudes. There were times where [multiple members would say], “we’re going to kick this [member] out, we hate him.” It never happened, we just stuck with each other. Those are your bros. We meet a lot of bands that we admire, like the Red Hot Chilli Peppers and Earth Wind and Fire, and these bands are still playing and really doing it. They still talk to each other. You meet them backstage, and everybody seems to be chill. That’s a beautiful thing to have in your career. There aren’t many bands anymore. Not many bands that are playing instruments, everybody pushes bands to the back. So it’s dope to be a part of this wave that’s pushing toward people with instruments and being a band.

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Ride Through Queensburg Projects With Bo Trill In "Queensburg Baby" Video

To so many young black men and women, hip-hop is much more than entertainment. Hip-hop is real life; the guns, violence, sex, drug sales, drug addiction, and bravado. Too many of us black men are so hurt, frustrated and disconnected from society that we need something, anything to hold on to. And for us, hip-hop is the one thing that we can own and connect to.

Today (Nov. 12), I ran across a video titled "Queensburg Baby" by Bo Trill. Trill, a rapper from the Laurel, MS., which is also my hometown, follows the well-worn path of spitting lyrics about hustling, gun-play and bagging someone's girl. Nothing is wrong with this. And if you know me, then you know how much I enjoy gangsta music, accurate gangsta music. Hip-hop comes from the streets, and unfortunately many of us black and latino men understanding is rooted in street politics and language. So much of what I know about life comes from the streets; the streets of Laurel.

With Unoski TV working the camera lens, viewers get a glimpse of these, well, Queensburg babies (no pun intended). QB is a small section in South Laurel. Here, in these grimy visuals, seeing these QB shorties brandishing guns bigger that are Lil Bow Bow, I was damn near moved to tears. From my 31st floor office in Times Square, I watched Bo Trill's "Queensburg Baby," looking at the faces of these young men, I literally remembered the countless nights, and days that I sold crack, cocaine and pills with some of these guys family members. Their OG's are my homies.

Seeing Bo Trill and his fellow-Queensburg Babies, as well as their aggression, machoism, their honest ignorance, and the urgency to trap dollars, and desperately hold on to something in this white man's world, I feel that shit. I totally understand everything about these Queensburg babies. They are from the city that sent me to prison.

I'll probably get in trouble for this post in the morning, but I'm from the streets of Laurel, trouble is what I do. I'll accept whatever trouble follows, if any, because what Bo Trill has to say, and what he doesn't have to language to say it, is just as important as what Kendrick Lamar and J.Cole has to say. And, I'm in a position to give a voice to the voiceless.  And more importantly, once the homies in Laurel see this video on Vibe.com, this small, what's a small feat to many, is big for my city, and just one more thing that we, Laurel babies have to hold on to.

Watch "Queensburg Baby" above.

Rest easy Justin "Muncy" Mack, and major salute to my OG, Larry Locc.

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