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A Judge Ruled A Neo-Nazi Who Admitted To Being Able To Make Bombs Is Not A Threat

A judge ruled that Brandon Russell, who authorities say has a framed photo of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh on his dresser, can be released on bond.

A Florida U.S. Magistrate said a Neo-Nazi who admitted to being capable of making a bomb was not a threat, and ruled he can be released on bond Friday. (June 9)

Investigators found guns and ammunition inside Brandon Russell's home along with a framed photo of convicted Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh on his dresser, yet Judge Thomas McCoun III doesn't think there's "clear and convincing evidence" Russell is a threat to the community.

The 21-year-old was charged in May 2017 with unlawful storage of explosive materials and possession of unregistered destructive devices. Federal officials learned of Russell through his roommate, former Neo-Nazi Devon Arthurs. Arthurs, who has reportedly converted to Islam, is in jail for killing his other two roommates who he said disrespected his faith.

Arthurs told authorities that all four of them shared a Tampa apartment as well as a Neo-Nazi belief, prior to him converting. According to The Washington Post, Arthurs was arrested May 19 after police found his roommates Jeremy Himmelman, 22 and Andrew Oneschuk, 18 with gunshot wounds to the head and upper body. Russell, according to court records, was outside crying.

After searching the property, authorities found bomb making materials and hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HTMD) in the garage. Russell admitted he's a white nationalist but would use the HTMD when he was a student at the University of South Florida in 2013 to boost DIY rockets.

Russell also told authorities he purchased two hunting riffles and ammo  in his hometown of Hammond, FL and while the judge said the purchases were concerning, he did not think it was enough to deny Russell bond. Prosecutors requested he bail be postponed for three days in hopes to submit another motion to change Judge McCoun's mind.

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72 Philadelphia Cops Moved To Desk Duty After Racist Facebook Posts

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The Philadelphia Inquirer reports advocates published a database that cataloged the posts in late May. Although all 72 officers haven't been disciplined yet, Philadelphia Police Commissioner, Richard Ross expects the officers will face internal consequences and several to be fired.

“Of all the things we have to contend with in this police department, of all the issues that we have to deal with, this is one we certainly could have done without,” Ross said during the press conference Tuesday (June. 18).

Ross' comments were made after a violent Fathers Day weekend that resulted in 28 people shot and five people dying.

With 3,100 posts tracing back to the Philadelphia cops, the investigation is being conducted by the department's Internal Affairs division and Ballard Spahr law firm. The racist posts were brought to light thanks to the Plain View Project. Founded in 2017 by a team of Philadelphia attorneys, they created a research database of social media posts made by officers in the community that displays violence, racism, and bigotry.

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Each post is being analyzed closely as they have to consider if they are protected by the First Amendment. If protected, there will be no further actions. If not, the next steps will be discussed.

Philadelphia Police Departments social media policy states that their employees "are prohibited from using ethnic slurs, profanity, personal insults; material that is harassing, defamatory, fraudulent, or discriminatory.”

It has not been announced how long the investigation will take.

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Maleah Davis' Casket Decorated With "My Little Pony" Rainbows

Maleah Davis' family laid their little girl to rest in a private ceremony, despite her disappearance and subsequent death meriting public attention. The 4-year-old's final resting place was a casket decorated as "My Little Pony."

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The cause and manner of Maleah's death has not be determined.

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Mitch McConnell Doesn't Support Reparations...And Water Is Wet

Reporters asked Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnel (R-KY) about his stance on reparations as the topic has become a hot-button issue during the 2020 presidential news cycle. On Tuesday, (June 18) the 77-year-old said he doesn't think paying the descendants of slaves "is a good idea."

"I don't think reparations for something that happened 150 years ago for whom none us currently living are responsible is a good idea," McConnell responded. "We've tried to deal with our original sin of slavery by fighting a civil war, bypassing landmark civil rights legislation. We elected an African American president."

The timing of the question came a day before the House Judiciary Committee would have a hearing on the issue, reportedly, for the first time in a decade.

"I think we're always a work in progress in this country, but no one currently alive was responsible for that, and I don't think we should be trying to figure out how to compensate for it. First of all, it would be pretty hard to figure out who to compensate. ... No, I don't think reparations are a good idea," McConnell said.

The House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties held a meeting Wednesday (June 19) "to examine, through open and constructive discourse, the legacy of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, its continuing impact on the community and the path to restorative justice."

Between The World And Me author and activist Ta-Nehisi Coates attended the meeting and responded to McConnel's comments.

"We grant that Mr. McConnell was not alive for Appomattox," Coates said, speaking of the battle that ended the Civil War. "But he was alive for the electrocution of George Stinney. He was alive for the blinding of Isaac Woodard. He was alive to witness kleptocracy in his native Alabama in a regime premised on electoral theft."

Coates rose to literary stardom in 2014 when he laid bare the case for reparation in The Atlantic.

"McConnell cited civil rights legislation yesterday, as well he should because he was alive to witness the harassment, jailing, and betrayal of those responsible for that legislation. I am sure they'd love a word with the majority leader."

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