Raury-Boycotts-Docle-Gabbana--1497976424

Raury Gave Dolce & Gabbana A Piece Of His Woke Mind By Pulling Off A Runway Protest

"They’re using the sh*t out of us, we’re not scapegoats," the artist said of his daring act of righteousness. 

Raury, holder of good vibes and black excellence, is on quite a journey since reaching his 21st earthstrong. A part of his career path recently lead him to Men's Fashion Week in Milan where he decided to make a bold political statement by staging a protest in a fashion show he was invited to participate in.

Speaking with GQ, the singer-songwriter explained exactly what prompted him to pull a fast one over fashion giants Dolce & Gabbana. The artist, who also holds a strong following on social media, says he was invited to take part in the designers' Spring-Summer ’18 millennial-themed runway show with a bunch of social media cool kids. While the show took place on Saturday (June 17), Raury says he did a little research on the brand the day before and discovered their strong allegiance to First Lady Melania Trump.

D&G heads Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana faced public scrutiny for dressing Trump and even released a $245 t-shirt mocking the outcry which read, "Boycott Dolce & Gabbana." They didn't stop there as D&G released an ad with teens protesting the brand a la Kendall Jenner/Pepsi vibes.

Fueled with the new information 24 hours before he was set to walk in the show, the artist explained how he was personally offended by D&G. "It was a troll. Me, as a young man from Stone Mountain, Georgia, the birthplace of the Klu Klux Klan, I really felt this mockery of boycotting," he said. "Who knows, if boycotts didn’t happen, if Rosa Parks and M.L.K. didn’t step up…who knows if I would even exist. Boycotting matters. Boycotting is real. Dolce’s entire campaign says it’s not real. I know that if I walk out there and support or endorse anything that sits next to Trump—or support someone who even makes dinner for Trump or whatever—then that means that I support Trump also. I have to let people know that I don’t support Trump and I don’t support those who are trying to undermine the voice of the people."

In the final moments of the show, Raury took of his D&G garb, baring his skin with the notes, "PROTEST", "DG GIVE ME FREEDOM," and "I AM NOT YOUR SCAPEGOAT" on his chest. "I felt like Dolce & Gabbana was literally trying to use the youth to wash their hands of any sort of heat from anyone who wants to protest against them," he said. "They’re using the sh*t out of us. We’re not scapegoats. You are not about to wash your hands with us."

At the end the show, the "Devil's Whisper" artist hopped of stage, left the clothes behind and tried to leave the building. Raury is hopeful that his stance is seen by those who know their power in their influence. "Show your true colors. And if you show your true colors, sh*t like this might happen to you," he said. "That’s just the truth. If your message is cool, then it’s cool. But if it ain’t, millennials are going to come and let you know. And we won’t let up."

Since the release of his 2015 projects All We Need and Indigo Child, the Atlanta native has gained co-signs from Andre 3000, Miguel and Kanye West. He was also a part of the XXL Freshman class that year with GoldLink, Def Loaf and Vince Staples.

Check out the rest of the interview here.

From the Web

More on Vibe

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

LeBron James Announced As A&R Of 2 Chainz's 'Rap Or Go To The League' Album

When he's not on the court, LeBron James spends his time posting videos of him vibing out to some of rap's most recent singles. Now, he's taking his ear for standout cuts a step further by becoming the A&R for 2 Chainz's forthcoming album.

On Mar. 1, the Atlanta native's Rap Or Go To The League project will hit streaming services and music store shelves after being teased for some time. "It's been quite the journey to get here," the "Spend It" rapper wrote on Twitter Tuesday afternoon (Feb. 19). "All night studio sessions, reflecting, & opening up on these records or as I call it therapy! This is my each one teach one body of work, I wanna celebrate black excellence!"

An Apple Music documentary will also accompany the album's debut. In a 60-second teaser, viewers witness Chainz and James in the studio discussing the possibility of a deluxe album and selecting guest artists for features. Rap Or Go To The League is Chainz's fifth studio album, what's being described as "his most personal, most lyrical, most soulful to date."

The soundscape arrives after Chainz released two EPs last year: The Play Don't Care Who Makes It and Hot Wings Are A Girl's Best Friend.

It’s been quite the journey to get here. All night studio sessions, reflecting, & opening up on these records or as I call it therapy! This is my each one teach one body of work, I wanna celebrate black excellence! ..... “Rap Or Go To The League” the album A&R by @KingJames 3/1 pic.twitter.com/08Y2fYKJ6X

— Tity Boi (2 Chainz) (@2chainz) February 19, 2019

Continue Reading
Model Slick Woods poses backstage for the Savage X Fenty Fall/Winter 2018 fashion show during NYFW at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on September 12, 2018 in Brooklyn, NY. (Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Savage X Fenty

Slick Woods Celebrates Mom's Release from Prison

After the birth of her son Saphir in September of 2018, and making headlines after walking Rihanna's Savage x Fenty A/W Show during New York Fashion Week while in labor, Slick Woods has more reasons to celebrate now that her mother has been released from prison after 17 years.

"Cried a lot," the 5'10 model wrote on her Instagram post featuring her mother. "Me n' mom, fresh out after 17 years in prison."

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Cried a lot 😳 Me n mom, fresh out after 17 years of prison 😴

A post shared by @ slickwoods on Feb 18, 2019 at 6:45pm PST

Since the age of four Woods was raised by her grandmother between Los Angeles and Minneapolis, after her mother was sentenced to prison for manslaughter. Unfortunately, Woods life at the age of seven shifted bumpier after her grandmother divorced her husband and the two found themselves spending time in cars and motels. The unofficial face of Fenty eventually became homeless and was on track to what many felt was the same path as her formerly incarcerated mother.

"I was in a place where I didn't believe in anything, so I was susceptible to evil energy," Woods said in an interview with E.S. Magazine in 2018. "I'm so easily turned. It's not something I'm proud of," she continued. "And when everyone in the world is telling you that you're going to be just like your mother, and then you're behind bars..."

Thankfully for Woods, after a stint in jail of two to three months at the age of 18, she was able to choose a different path for herself, and a year later she modeled for Kanye West in Yeezy, allowing her to one day provide for her mother once she was released from prison.

"Being a gang member, everyone expected her to not be the best mum," Woods said in an interview with Elle Magazine back in 2018. "But my mum was very hands-on with me as a child. My mummy read to me in the womb," she said. "And she's proud because she knows that everybody expected me to be exactly what she was. She went to prison when she was 19. I became a model at 19. And I can take care of my mother when she gets out."

Continue Reading
Moses Robinson/Getty Images for Neighborhood Awards

Steve Harvey Says He "Misspoke" During Mo'Nique Interview

Earlier this month, Steve Harvey and Mo'Nique sparked a debate on social media following their interview on the former's daytime talk show. On the subject of money opposite integrity, the comedians engaged in a discussion that left some viewers scratching their heads concerning Harvey.

Now, in an interview with E! News, the Family Feud host is expressing his repentance over his statements. "My only regret in the whole thing was I misspoke. In the heat of the discussion, I used the word 'integrity,' when really I was talking about the method in which she was going about things, and that's the only thing," Harvey said. "I just want my young fans, the ones who look up to me, who consider me a role model in everything to know that I misused the word 'integrity' in the wrong context."

The statement in contention surrounds Harvey's claim that as black entertainers in Hollywood, "we can't come out here and do it any kind of way we want to," referring to how Mo'Nique decided to call out those in show business that she feels placed obstacles on her path. The 62-year-old continued to state that money is the name of the game.

"This ain't the black man's game, this ain't the white man's game. This is the money game," he previously said. "And you cannot sacrifice yourself. The best thing you can do for poor people is not be one of them." Mo'Nique responded by stating integrity used to be the root of anyone's actions, but "we've lost integrity worrying about the money." Harvey retorted by stating if he takes up a cause and his career begins to suffer, then it'll affect his children and grandchildren. "There are ways to win the war in a different way," he said at the time. The interview surrounded Mo'Nique's fight for equality in Hollywood and the comments she made to have her voice heard.

Watch the full interview below.

Continue Reading

Top Stories