Roscoe Dash Says He’s Not A Lyft Driver, But A Family Member Is

As capitalism continues to tighten its grip on America, the idea of middle class has decimated, only leaving room for the wealthy and those of struggle life (points to self). Alternative employment in the United States has skyrocketed over the past few years with 40 percent reporting “contingent” gigs in 2015. This means contracted, temp and self-employed individuals are making moves to not only take care of themselves but their families.

READ Shaq As An Undercover Lyft Driver Is Proof There’s Still Good In The World

So it wasn’t too surprising to see a screenshot of what appeared to be Jeffery Lee Johnson Jr., widely known as Roscoe Dash, as a Lyft driver to a customer in Atlanta this week.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BVYLthQFvc6/?hl=en

What’s more surprising are those who mocked the artist for reportedly taking up a new job. Endless Lyft requests have filled the comment section of his Instagram with other digs. Regardless of the jets and jewelry flaunted by those in the game, making money in the music industry is rather difficult, especially when you’re stereotyped as a southern-turn-up rapper. In a statement to VIBE, Dash says that’s not quite the case. The rapper explains that family and friends have borrowed his Tahoe for work with Lyft.

“Now, I want to make sure I say there is NOTHING wrong with being an Uber or Lyft driver. Although this was not me who was actually driving, I HAVE A FAMILY,” he wrote via email. “I have two daughters to provide for and a whole other collection of people relying on me to support them. For somebody to tell me that others trying to do the same thing are wrong to do so is simply just not okay. “

Although he has no written affiliation with Lyft, Dash plans to utilize its services to share his new music with unsuspecting passengers. He even offered another ride to the customer who thought he was an actual driver.” My team and I want to offer him a ride to make up for the cancelled ride of which I think he wanted to happen very badly,” he said. “I still won’t be driving (sorry Twitter haters, the allegation is simply untrue), but I WILL be in the car. I will also sit in on random rides provided by Lyft playing songs off of my upcoming album and meeting with fans throughout the course of this weekend. It’s important to take the high road, no matter the situation. Rather than choosing negativity, I CHOOSE MUSIC!”

The 27-year-old shot to fame in the late 2000’s with the jams “All the Way Turnt Up,” “Sexy Girl Anthem,” “Show Out” as well as his collaborative work with Waka Flocka and Big Sean. His solo work helped create the “turn up” era of the already heavy southern imprint on hip-hop culture.

In the midst of his come up, Dash found himself battling for proper credentials on some of his collaborative work. In 2012, he accused Wale of not giving him writing credit on the Grammy-nominated single, “Lotus Flower Bomb” with Miguel. He also claimed he wasn’t properly credited on Kanye West’s G.O.O.D Music compilation, Cruel Summer.

He also was left defending his first single “All The Way Turned Up,” which many believed was a track by Travis Porter. Speaking to Billboard in 2015 about his project Dash Effect 2, the artist spoke highly of his new independence and leaving his beefs behind. “Now I’m about three to four weeks in as a completely independent artist, not having that ball and chain, to an effect,” he said. “It’s time to show the world what I’ve been doing for however long and just reach back with the music that I want to be able to make.”

It isn’t known what happened to his plans for DE2, but the artist released the lengthy project Glitch in 2016 with features from Waka Flocka, Big Sean, and Juvenile. He’s also continued to promote his music on social media.

While Dash isn’t connected to the company, other acts have be honest about their former position with the company. Speaking to VIBE in 2016, Sir The Baptist shared how his time as a Lyft driver helped him meet future collaborators. “I was an upcoming artist and would drive 12 hours each day,” he said. “I had a mobile recording studio under my seat and would put all of the money back into studio time, advertising and advancing my career. I was also using Lyft as a tool, not just to get money, but to build relationships with my community in Chicago. I would take the stories from my Lyft rides and use them in my songwriting and inspiration. I would estimate that nearly 50-60 percent of my team is comprised of people I met while driving and using Lyft.”

Although Dash has no plans to go behind the wheel as a Lyft driver, this situation has allowed him to use the shared-ride service to advance re-navigate his career.

READ Sir The Baptist Reflects On Past Career As A Lyft Driver On “Driver Appreciation Day”

READ Sir The Baptist Reflects On Past Career As A Lyft Driver On “Driver Appreciation Day”

Tags: lyft, roscoe dash