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Tia Mowry Confirms A 'Sister, Sister' Reboot Is In The Works

*Cues theme song* "Oh, Sister Sister, never knew how much I missed ya'."

Everyone’s favorite twin duo is working their way back to our televisions—and no, we’re not talking Mary-Kate and Ashley. Tia Mowry confirmed with Nylon magazine on Wednesday (May 31) that she and her sister, Tamera, have been working on a reboot of their hit comedy series, Sister, Sister, but admits it’s harder than either of the women anticipated.

“We’re looking, right now, for a producer and a writer, someone who can kind of be a leader of the pack in regards to running the show,” Tia Mowry began. Apparently, people aren’t sticking to the idea as swiftly as the duo would hope.

“I thought people would kind of be jumping on it, but it’s a lot harder than my sister and I thought it would be. Everything in my career has always been a challenge.”

The mom of one plans on continuing to seek “out more fun and inspiring ways to get people in the kitchen.” Currently, Mowry is host to Tia Mowry At Home on the Cooking Channel where she prepares fast and healthy meals, despite her busy lifestyle.

Upon reminiscing on her favorite moments on the show with the likes of Taraji P. Henson, Kobe Bryant, Gabrielle Union, and more, Mowry admits she’d want her character, Tia Landry to replicate her actual life as a mother and wife. Unbeknownst to many, the Mowry twins would sit with the producers and update them on what was going on in their lives and use that as material for the show.

“A lot of people might not know this, but every year at the beginning of the season, me and my sister would sit down with the producers and tell them what’s going on with our lives in real life, and they would turn those into stories.”

When they couldn’t experience regular things other teenagers would do because of the show, they’d fill in the gaps on their script and live vicariously through their characters. Little did they know, most of us watching were living vicariously through them whether it came to their fashion or Tia’s on-screen boyfriend, Tyreke Scott. So, if the show does come to light, it’ll be every 90s kids dream come true.

#tbt sister,sister party days

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VIBE Vixen- Karissa Maggio

Best Of VIBE Vixen's Boss Talk Podcast: Saweetie, Amara La Negra And More On Making Boss Moves

VIBE Vixen's Boss Talk podcast amplifies the voices of women and she/her-identifying individuals in their respective industries as they discuss their journeys toward becoming the bosses we know today. From their demeanor and confidence and persevering through life’s pitfalls to make a name for themselves in their own way, being a boss is much more than 'just running sh*t.'

We rounded up some of our favorite pieces of advice from our first few episodes! Our bosses so far have ranged from rappers (Saweetie and Kash Doll), to authors (Karyn Parsons) to activists (Peppermint). Each of the bosses invited on the show have had some incredible journeys, and we thank them for giving us insight into how they've become the bosses they are today.

Whether they're thanking their mothers for inspiring them to be their best (like Amara La Negra), or chalking up some boss moves to being their authentic selves (Bevy Smith), this retrospective episode focuses on the awesome words these bosses have shared with us thus far.

Listen below to our "Best Of..." episode as well as all of the episodes of Boss Talk Podcast. Be on the lookout for new episodes coming soon.

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Like Mother, Like Daughter: Blue Ivy Danced To 'Before I Let Go' At Her Dance Recital

Every so often, we get glimpses into the life of Blue Ivy Carter. The first-born child of Beyoncé and JAY-Z has proven to be a natural-born performer. Over the weekend, the seven-year-old performed in a recital for her dance school- the Debbie Allen Dance Academy.

While it’s still way too early to determine what Blue will do for a living, if all else fails, she could definitely follow in her mother’s footsteps.

A video emerged of one of the routines Blue performed in the recital, which was to her mother’s rendition of the song “Before I Let Go.” Ms. Carter was in the front for the routine, and showed off some pretty impressive moves, including the Electric Slide, the “floss” and a split.

“Blue ivy dancing to the song she choreographed*,” wrote one Twitter user, while another wrote “Nice of Blue Ivy to invent dancing.”

Fans of Blue Ivy were dubbed “The Ivy League,” and ever since footage of the little girl hitting some moves with ease emerged, they haven’t shown signs of slowing down.

Check out Blue’s routines below.

Blue Ivy dancing to Beyoncé's song “Before I Let Go” 🔥💕 pic.twitter.com/bj63d4RpfX

— Blue Ivy Source (@blueivysource) June 16, 2019

Blue Ivy dancing to “The Pink Panther” during the annual Spring Concert at the Debbie Allen Dance Academy 💕 pic.twitter.com/R8h084nEaj

— Blue Ivy Source (@blueivysource) June 16, 2019

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CNN Sparks Backlash For Article On White Woman Named LaKeisha

Over the weekend, CNN ignited a debate after they highlighted the story of a woman from a small town in western Ohio with an “ethnic-sounding” name.

LaKeisha Francis is a blonde-haired, blue-eyed bartender who did not know that her name was “stereotypically black,” as her parents believed it was just a beautiful name that they wanted their daughter to have. However, as she grew older, she realized that her “ethnic-sounding name” was making life difficult.

“I was joking with my co-worker one day and said, 'I'm just going to tell them my name is Emily so I can avoid all of this,''' Francis says of the comments she receives in response to her name, which range from snickering to disbelief from others due to her appearance.

“So if black-sounding names are looked at with such suspicion, why do some black people persist in using them?” one of the questions raised in the article read. “And where did the practice start in the first place?”

Later in the article, CNN reveals that LaKeisha is married with two kids who bear non-traditional names as well, and that she has “learned to live with being black for a minute.”

“A name doesn't make a non-Black person 'Black for a minute,' that's a trash take,” wrote one Twitter user in response to the article. Another wrote “I don’t know what you were trying to accomplish with this when black folk faced with ethnic names faced more consequences than a white chick name lakiesha.”

Where do you stand on the topic? Let us know in the comments, and check out a few opinions below.

Read it twice just to make sure I didn't miss anything the first time. And sure enough it was worse the second time around. A name doesn't make a non-Black person "Black for a minute," that's a trash take. S/n: Jamal while a somewhat common name in the Black community is Arabic. pic.twitter.com/O6HXYeM66M

— IAmDamion🎤 (@themorganrpt) June 16, 2019

I don’t know what you were trying to accomplish with this when black folk faced with ethnic names faced more consequences than a white chick name lakiesha. I’m sure with her complexion she still got the American protection!

— H Boog (@HankDon_1) June 16, 2019

I don’t know what you were trying to accomplish with this when black folk faced with ethnic names faced more consequences than a white chick name lakiesha. I’m sure with her complexion she still got the American protection!

— H Boog (@HankDon_1) June 16, 2019

I don’t know what you were trying to accomplish with this when black folk faced with ethnic names faced more consequences than a white chick name lakiesha. I’m sure with her complexion she still got the American protection!

— H Boog (@HankDon_1) June 16, 2019

I don’t know what you were trying to accomplish with this when black folk faced with ethnic names faced more consequences than a white chick name lakiesha. I’m sure with her complexion she still got the American protection!

— H Boog (@HankDon_1) June 16, 2019

She can change her name. But we can’t change the color of our skin or the hate they have for us.

— Sh (@shersweety) June 16, 2019

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