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50 Cent Says '4:44' Was Like "Golf Course Music"

"I liked the sh*t, but I'm gonna keep it 100: the sh*t was too smart."

Despite 4:44 achieving platinum status and it being lauded as a great comeback album, JAY-Z has received his fair share of detractors. Recently, 50 Cent reviewed 4:44 on Instagram and dubbed Hov's latest offering "golf course music."

I listened to Jay sh--, that 4:44," 50 began, "I thought the sh*t was aight. I liked the sh*t, but I'm gonna keep it 100: the sh*t was too smart. I felt like I was supposed to be wearing glasses and tie a f**king sweater around my waist. It was like Ivy League sh*t."

Then, 50 acknowledged that though JAY-Z released a solid album, that he no longer should proclaim himself as the best, because of his age. "I'mma tell you the truth: Ni**as is hot out here. They don't wanna hear that sh*y. They just wanna have a good time. F**k that. You can't be the best rapper at 47, because the new ni**as is here," said 50.

He added: "I ain't gon' hold you up. That sh*t was like golf course music."

Since 4:44 was released last week, Kanye West reportedly severed ties with JAY-Z's streaming service Tidal. In addition, Future and Boosie BadAzz took offense to some of Hov's lyrics and responded with jabs of their own on social media. Watch 50's video below:

This article originally appeared on Billboard.

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ROBYN BECK

Drake, Boogz, Gilla And Other Toronto Artists Talks Toronto Gun Violence In New Documentary

Mustafa The Poet commissioned some of Toronto's brightest stars to speak candidly about the city's growing gun violence. Against a black backdrop Rax, Gilla and the Six-God himself Drake, all discuss losing a peer senselessly to the streets.

Titled Remember Me, Toronto the somber 11-minute documentary shed a light on the emotional after effect gun violence has on the victim's loved ones. “They don’t know the pain I’ve been through,” Boogz from Malvern said. “The friends I’ve lost.”

Drake attributed the city's violence--which boasts more than 98 homicides and 406 shootings in 2018, making it Toronto's bloodiest year on record-- to feuds passed down generationally. "In a lot of the situations in the city it's passed down by elders, people don't even know the logistics of the beef or why or what really happened, it's just I am conditioned to hate this area of this group of people, " he said.

While street life may be glamorized in some artist's music, Baka NotNice noted the consequences of that lifestyle are far from braggadocious.“You know that feeling when you get the cuffs put on you and you get put in the back of the car. It’s not a game when that happens It’s for real,” he said.

The "God's Plan" rapper also discussed the power street credibility has on the male ego. "It's a daunting path to try and be the biggest and baddest from your ends," Drake said.

Reflectively, Gilla said all this death could be a great teacher in a perfect world.

“I wish we could push a button so that everyone we lost to street life, they’re back, but everything that happened that led up to this sh*t we can remember, and all the pain and sh*t that we still felt we can still feel it and now we have a chance to be like ‘Yo, do we really want to do this sh*t again?'

Check out Remember Me, Toronto Shebib scored documentary above.

 

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R&B Singer Andre "Mr. Rhythm" Williams Passes Away At 82

R&B singer and producer Andre Williams, who was best known as Mr. Rhythm, has passed away, Pravda Records confirms . The entertainer reportedly passed away on Sunday (Mar. 17) at the age of 82.

"It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of legendary artist Andre Williams," the Chicago-based label wrote in a statement on Facebook. "He died this after in Chicago at the age of 82. He touched our lives and the lives of countless others. We love you Dre."

William's manager, Kenn Goodman, told Billboard that the singer lost his battle to colon cancer while staying in hospice care. "He was diagnosed two weeks ago with colon cancer that spread to his lungs and brain," Goodman said. "After that his body started shutting down pretty quickly. But [he] was committed to trying to sing and record again."

Born Zephire "Andre" Williams, he moved from Alabama to Detroit as a teen in the early 1950s to launch his  music career. He gained local attention after winning the first place prize at the Warfield Theatre's amateur night show eight weeks in a row.

Williams then signed to Fortune Records and took over as the lead vocalist of the group, The Five Dollars. The group was later renamed Andre Williams and the Don Juans and released the top-10 charting single "Bacon Fat."

He would later go on to produce and record tracks including "The Stroke," "Humpin' Bumpin' & Thumpin'," the Five Dutones' "Shake a Tail Feather" and other Fortune Records singles like "Jail Bait" and "The Greasy Chicken."

In his later years, Williams continued to make music. He toured through Europe in 2001, 2005, and 2006, as well as produced a handful of indie compilation albums and group records. Williams was inducted into the Michigan Rock and Roll Legends Hall of Fame in 2012.

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Gilbert Carrasquillo

UPenn Grad John Legend Talks "Rigged" Education System Amid Cheating Scandal

John Legend is weighing in on the college admissions cheating scandal that rocked Hollywood and the wealthy community earlier this month. Legend specifically discussed the challenges with America's education system while attending the iHeartRadio Music Awards in Los Angeles last Wednesday (Mar. 13).

While Legend highlighted the wrongdoing in the parents who reportedly paid and bribed their children's way into elite schools, he suggested that people focus on the bigger picture. "I went to a good school," Legend, who studied English with an emphasis on African-American literature at the University of Pennsylvania, said. "I think it's a longer conversation because I think a lot of people look at this rightly as fraudulent and dishonest."

He continued: "But the bottom line is, the system has been rigged for wealthy people for a long time," he continued. "The admissions system rewards people's parents being wealthy and people's parents having gone to a certain school. There's a lot of legal ways to do that that still aren't really that fair to a lot of other people."

As previously reported, the U.S. federal prosecutors charged 50 people who were allegedly part of a secret college admissions scheme. Wealthy parents, including Full House star Lori Loughlin and Desperate Housewives' Felicity Huffman, allegedly paid more than $25 million to a "college admissions counselor" who used the money to fake test scores and bribe college officials.

Shortly after the news broke, Chrissy Teigen made fun of the situation by posting a an image of a professional soccer team with her and husband John's faces Photoshopped on two of the bodies. She was referencing court documents that alleged Loughlin paid to have her daughter appear to be a recruit for the University of Southern California's crew team.

The FBI is still pursuing the investigation.

does this look real? we are trying to get into harvard @jenatkinhair @mrmikerosenthal @johnlegend pic.twitter.com/jpcNGq2mVi

— christine teigen (@chrissyteigen) March 13, 2019

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