La La Anthony Talks Battling Uniform Identity As An Afro-Latina Actress

La La Anthony’s roots in the entertainment industry are immersed in the urban sector. Often times, the sector is heavily-associated with the African American community. Identifying as Afro-Latina, you’d think this would benefit the MTV VJ-turned-actress, but it’s created greater roadblocks in her career.

The Power actress recently spoke with Latina about overcoming the issues in not being viewed as the typical Latina in Hollywood.

READ: Amid Divorce Rumors, La La Anthony’s Life Powerfully Comes Full Circle

“I definitely don’t feel like I’m what Hollywood thinks of when they think of a Latina actress at all,” the Brooklyn native told the mag. “They are imagining a different look, a different vibe. People still tell me, ‘You speak Spanish? You’re Spanish? You’re Puerto Rican? They can’t wrap their minds around it.”

Something that Anthony believes the industry neglects to understand is that Latinx identity is racially diverse. Pleading to help Hollywood understand that members of Latinx lineage comes in all “shades,” “textures,” and “colors,” the 38 year-old television personality reveals, “The industry just hasn’t been thinking outside the box when it comes to Latina women.”

“We come in all colors. My grandfather was extremely dark and from Puerto Rico, but his brother had blond hair and blue eyes. There are so many different shades, and I think Hollywood has yet to realize that.” – La La Anthony

READ: Dascha Polanco Believes Hollywood’s Obsession With “Fake Latinas” Disallows Black Latinas

Last month (June 12), Orange Is The New Black star, Dascha Polanco admitted to Vivala that she’s often pressured to conceal her Afro-Latina identity.

“We have to be ‘Fake [Latinas].’ And here’s the thing with ‘Fake Latinas’ – when you look at Latinas who are succeeding in Hollywood… [they’re] super thin and you can’t really tell if they’re Latina or not,” the 34 year-old actress told the site.

LISTEN: Reclaiming Blackness: NPR’s ‘Latino USA’ Dives Into What It Means To Be Afro-Latino