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Courtesy of Starz

The 13 Best Lines From 'Power' Episode 403 "The Kind Of Man You Are"

"If you die by lethal injection, will Yazmine even remember you?" Angela

Things have gone from bad to worse and Ghost is visibly beginning to unravel at the seams. In Power episode 403 titled "The Kind of Man You Are," Ghost is slowly being backed into a corner where he starts to contemplate the meager options he may have left. Sensing the desperation in his client, Proctor introduces Terry Silver to act as second chair. Silver boasts an impressive winning streak when it comes to suspected murderers facing the death penalty. Yet despite working to prove Ghost’s innocence, Silver--who isn’t short on arrogance and judgment--makes it clear he thinks Ghost is guilty of the crime.

While Ghost and Silver “warm up” to one another, the weight of his predicament and potential death sentence causes Raina to become an emotional mess, while motivating Tariq--who truly only wants a father figure-- to fall further into Kanan’s rabbit hole.

Taking heed to Proctor’s instructions, Ghost keeps quiet and keeps to himself while in prison, but his good boy act comes to an end, and if he wants his secret to remain a secret he’s going to have to take yet again another L. It’s not looking good for Ghost. Check out the 13 best lines from Power, episode 403 “The Kind of Man You Are.”

"I'm not here to judge your innocence brother, I'm here to save your life." Terry Silver

Viewers are introduced to Terry Silver who will act as second chair for Ghost's defense. The arrogant but skilled attorney was called on by Proctor for his track record, specifically as it pertains to those facing the death penalty. While Silver maintains he will work for the W, he makes it crystal clear he doesn't believe Ghost is innocent.

"Look Tommy, he lies about everything. I'm pretty sure he lied about this too." Tariq

Tommy takes Ghost's request of protecting his family to heart and begins taking a more active role with the children. While driving the kids to school and saying bye to Raina, Tommy questions Tariq about his poor behavior towards his mom. Riq makes it known he doesn’t care about helping his family and believes the worst about his father. Riq also suggests Tommy do the same.

"James isn't the type of guy that would kill somebody." Dre

The feds have taken Dre, Julio, Keisha and other known associates of Ghost in for questioning. Aware that everything they say can be used against Ghost (and themselves) they all keep their cool. Sandoval attempts to get Dre to give up useful information, but instead he sings Ghost's praises.

"When did James St. Patrick move out of the marital residence?" Angela

Angela sits with Keisha in the interrogation room and is armed not only with the law, but her self-righteousness. Keisha knows Angela already has the answers to the questions she's asking, but what Keisha doesn't know is Angela is attempting to craft an argument to break spousal privilege and force Tasha to testify against Ghost.

"The kids are blameless, John. Is that our goal? To put the kids in the system?" Angela

While Angela wears her poker face in the interrogation room with Keisha, she attempts to reason with Mak and the others when it comes to Ghost's children. Angela doesn't want to put Tasha on the stand because she knows if both parents are put in jail, the children will be placed in foster care. Mak however is only concerned with winning the high-profile case and views the kids as "collateral damage."

"Riq, let go!" Raina

Ghost's arrest and news of his potential death sentence has made headlines in the press and the blogs. While in school, a bully approaches Raina about her father being an alleged cop killer, and as she begins to cry, Tariq slams him against the wall. Riq showing signs of his father’s murderous ways, keeps a tight grip on the bully. Raina screams at Tariq to let go and when he finally does, he ditches school entirely.

"Yeah after, when he pulled me over that night like I told Angela." Ghost

Silver, Proctor and Ghost sit in the prison interrogation room and try and figure out a way they can get the DNA evidence thrown out. While going over the night in question, Ghost says the only time he interacted with Knox was when he pulled him over. It then dawns on Ghost it was then Knox was able to get his DNA on him. What was more surprising was the fact that Angela knew, and didn't notify the judge.

"You know those plans I was talking about? Well it's time. Ready to do some work?" Kanan

Kanan continues to sink his teeth further into Tariq, but now he's kicking it up a notch. Instead of just filling Riq's head with lies about his father and family, he's now priming him for a life of crime, and using his private school as a means to do it.

"If you never left Greg for St. Patrick, Greg would still be alive." Agent Bailey Markham

Friend and mentor to Knox, agent Bailey Markham stops by Angela's office to accuse her of getting Knox killed. While Mak believes Knox was the mole, Markham is on a quest to clear his name and restore honor to an officer who died in a line of duty. Markham insists Knox's death is Angela's fault and claims had she never began dating St. Patrick, he'd still be alive.

"You know exactly what you were doing. You just don't want anyone to know who you are. Right, Ghost?" Teresi

After confirming his suspicions that James St. Patrick is Ghost, Teresi confronts Ghost in the common area and tells him he's aware of his little secret. Ghost tries to play it off and says he's never heard of the name, but as soon as Teresi threatens to tell Mak, Ghost acquiesces to his threat and agrees to have Tommy deliver $20,000 to his home address every week for his wife’s cancer treatment, adding yet another problem to the list of never-ending problems he already has.

"If James said the traffic stop happened, it happened!" Proctor.

Terry Silver doesn't buy what St. Patrick is selling, but wonders why Proctor is so adamant about about proving James' innocence. Had it been up to Silver, he would’ve had Ghost take a plea deal a long time ago. Before Ghost enters the interrogation room, Silver tells Proctor he wasn't able to find any record of the traffic stop on the night in question, which only adds to his belief that Ghost is guilty.. Proctor reassures Silver if James said Knox pulled him over Knox pulled him over.

"If you die by lethal injection, will Yazmine even remember you?" Angela

Surprisingly, Valdes walks into the prison interrogation room asking to speak with St. Patrick alone. Ghost denies her request and while the two talk, Valdes tries to get Ghost to take a plea deal: life in prison. Up until now, Ghost was adamant about not confessing to Knox's murder, but when Angela questions his integrity as a man and whether or not Yazmine, his youngest daughter will even remember him if dies by lethal injection, Ghost contemplates the deal on the table.

"No baby girl. Nobody can kill your daddy." Ghost

After Tariq stormed out of school Raina chased after him and began crying. Photos of her littered the newspaper, which came to Ghost’s attention when Marshall hands him the paper. Ghost phones home to hear Raina is sobbing. As Tasha comforts her, she asks if he'll die in prison. Putting on a brave front but holding back his own tears, Ghost says no, but wonders if he just lied to his baby girl.

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Studio Finds No Inappropriate Behavior In 'Rookie' Afton Williamson Allegation

Back in August, former "The Rookie" star Afton Williamson publically outlined claims of bullying, harassment and sexual assault against the head of the show's hair department. Taking to Instagram, the actress alleged Sally Nicole Ciganovich and guest star Demetrius Grosse as the culprits. However on Tuesday, (Sept. 17) Entertainment One released a statement stating after an investigation was conducted, there was no proof to any of Williamson's claims. Williamson, took to social media to blast the findings.

“It’s heartbreaking for everyone on that set, past, and present, and for every actor out there who stands in the face of harassment, discrimination, assault, and injustice,” Williamson wrote. “As a black woman, an artist, an actor, in 2019, my speaking the truth, standing up for myself, and leaving an unsafe work environment changed things for a lot of people: black women, artists, actors, victims, and survivors of injustice and discrimination.”

Demetrius Grosse’s attorney, Andrew Brettler, called Williamson's claim "completely meritless."

"My client was libeled all over the media before any of the claims could even be verified. No one should publish serious allegations like these in such a reckless manner. Demetrius lost multiple jobs as a result of being falsely accused. We’re glad that the investigation has been completed and are grateful to eOne for its unwavering support. Onward.”

In a separate statement, ABC expressed gratitude the investigation was over.

“We are glad that eOne has completed an investigation into allegations on the set of ‘The Rookie.’ We are confident that eOne takes these matters seriously and that they will continue to look for the best ways to surface concerns and address complaints.”

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'Hustlers' Inspiration Wishes Cardi B Portrayed Her Instead Of Jennifer Lopez

Critics and fans have fawned over Jennifer Lopez's strong performance in Hustlers but one important figure wasn't impressed.

Speaking to Vanity Fair Wednesday (Sept. 17), Samantha Barbash admitted she enjoyed parts of the film that were inspired by her life, but most of it–like many adaptions of real-life events–was fabricated. Barbash refused to give her film rights to the producers of the film, leaving them to rely on the infamous New York magazine feature for the screenplay.

Barbash and former friend Roselyn Keo were arrested in 2014 for allegedly drugging men and stealing upwards of $200,000 from them during their employment at Scores, a gentlemen's club in New York.

Barbash pleaded guilty to conspiracy, assault, and grand larceny and served five years of probation. Keo took a plea deal in exchange for no jail time. The ladies reportedly indulged in the finer things in life with the money like cards and Hermes bags. The women have defended their actions after claiming the clients were beyond degrading in the club.

As Barbash watched the film with her family over the weekend, she was shocked at the inaccuracies. She tells the outlet that producers offered her "pennies" to be included in the film. She also says she never talked to Lopez about the role.

“I’m a businesswoman. J. Lo doesn’t work for free. Why would I? At the end of the day, I have bags that are worth more than what they wanted to pay me," she said. "She had my birthmark that I have. I used to have a piercing on the top of my lip. She had it on the bottom. She had a tattoo on her finger. I had it on my wrist.” But her mannerisms? No. I am nothing like that in person.”

The portrayal of her working relationship with Keo was also inaccurate, Barbash said. Social media posts of them partying together reflect a loving friendship but Barbash insists the film take on Keo (named Destiny and played by Constance Wu) was a lie. “She wasn’t a friend—she was a coworker.… There was no sisterhood—it was business and that’s it,” she said.

But the now-business owner praised Cardi B's performance. Although the rapper isn't in the majority of the film, Barbash wishes she was. “Her 10 minutes was a great 10 minutes…It’s funny because, when I first heard that the film was coming out, [my business partner] said [she wished] Cardi would have played me," she said. "Even though she is not an actress, she was in the strip club world and she gets it. She would have maybe played a better me. Not taking away from Jennifer. But just because Cardi was in the business.”

Hustlers proved to be a hit at the box office, grossing over $33 million in its opening weekend. Lopez has also received critical praise for her performance which could turn into nominations in the awards sector next year.

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Stanley Nelson Lays Bare The Complicated Cool Of Miles Davis

Miles Davis had it. Whatever it was, Miles Davis was the sole proprietor. The aura, skill, and style that oozed from Davis’ pores helped propel the trumpeter to stardom. His musical accomplishments were only made more striking by the swagger that garnished them. Davis’ cool, projected best on stage, was an unwavering confidence with a dollop of syrupy charisma. Even his voice, a sandpaper-like whisper, which came as a result of yelling after throat surgery, weaved its way into the mythological-like figure Davis became. To be frank, Miles Davis was a cool-ass motherfucker and he knew it.

Yet underneath Davis’ cool was a man equally tormented by the second-class citizenship his country forced on him, as well as his own personal demons. Standing up to the racist government sometimes proved easier than defeating his alcoholism and drug abuse. Those closest to Davis felt his venom whenever he bit, and graciously allowed their love for him to be a balm for the wounds he left. How could the same man who composed and performed Kind of Blue be responsible for the cruelty of those who loved him so?

Well, it’s complicated.

Director Stanley Nelson lays Miles Davis bare—his good, bad, and beautiful—to a new generation while crystalizing the jazz musician’s legend to longtime fans with Miles Davis: The Birth of Cool. Nelson’s latest demonstrates Davis' complexity and all that he endured.

Nelson invited VIBE to his 5,000-square-foot Harlem office to discuss Davis. Before getting into the nitty-gritty of the nearly two-hour film, Nelson offers a firm handshake and an even stronger espresso. He apologizes for not having much sugar but makes up for it with a Wicker basket full of snacks that sits atop his white granite kitchen island. I opt for cookies and sneak the last bag of white cheddar popcorn for the train ride back to the office.

As we walk past the stainless steel appliances and through the dining room, the September sun shines bright through windows striking the white living room walls. Several books about Frederick Douglass are neatly stacked on the dining room table. Nelson reveals the writer and abolitionist will be the subject of his next feature, but for now, the 68-year-old director is entrenched in promotion for Miles Davis, an artist he says “transcends music.”

In between sips of tea, Nelson explains why Davis will always be a figure worth examing,

VIBE: What is your definition of cool? Stanley Nelson: I think the definition of cool changes with the times. I think cool is a certain calmness and being ahead of the times. It’s also a certain sophistication, I think Miles Davis had for so much of his life personified.

What do you think are some of the ingredients that go into making a Miles Davis? I don’t think there are very many people, across all genres, who can compare to Miles Davis. Miles Davis did what he did for five decades and was a leader in so many different movements in music and in jazz. Miles Davis transcends music.

What do you mean when you say "Miles Davis transcends music?" Miles Davis transcended the music because he was a leader in the way he looked, in the way he dressed, in things he demanded as you can see in the film. He demanded that he be treated with an amount of respect. The fact that he had black women on the covers of his albums, all those kinds of things made Miles Davis so different from so many other jazz musicians, who we love and admire for their music. We love and admire Miles Davis for his music, but it wasn’t just the music that made Miles Davis special.

Miles was also undeniably a beautiful looking man, and this was in the 50s and 60s. Miles Davis had very dark skin which was something that was not in the general public how it was thought of, so Miles kind of flipped that on its head.

This is going to sound like a dumb question but I have to ask it anyway. Why did you decide to honor Miles Davis with this film? There are a lot of reasons for making this film. There are a lot of reasons for making any film so whenever filmmakers tell you there’s only one reason they’re probably just lying, or saying whatever their publicist wants them to say. For one, his music is so incredible I would say he is easily one of the most important musicians of the 20th century, maybe the most important, you can argue that in any genre. Two, I’m a jazz lover and three Miles Davis is a very complicated individual so it makes for a better film. It’s not a simple story. I also think as we got into the film that Miles Davis’ story isn’t only about music, but it's about being a black person in the second half of the 20th century in the United States and I think that’s what makes the film work on a different level than a lot of other jazz films.

Veering off from Mr. Davis for a bit, how do you decide which topics or events you want to turn into films? You’ve done the black press, you’ve done a story about The Black Panthers, you did a story about Emmett Till. How do you choose which one to make into a film?

One of the great lessons for me was the first film I made called Two Dollars and A Dream. It was about Madame C.J. Walker and it took me seven years to make the film and I realize at that point films can take a long time to make, to raise the money and actually get the films made, so it's really important that the film be important to me, at least, that’s part of how I think about films when I think about what to do next. I’ve also been afforded the opportunity to paint on a big canvas so I’m trying to make stories that are big. I’m not just making small stories.

Did you always have this mentality of making big stories? I think so. I think part of that was unspoken, not really something I thought of. If you make something you want it to be a success, you want it to be a big success especially if it's going to take seven or 10 years of your life.

Why was Carl Lumbly the one you picked to voice Davis? Carl Lumbly is a great actor and he’s someone that I knew. Carl did the narration for one of our other films a long time ago, so Carl is someone I thought of. We sent him a bunch of tapes of Davis’ actual voice, and he practiced and we got back to him in a week and asked him to give us his Miles Davis voice over the phone and when he did, we were like, that’s good. It wasn’t perfect, but we could make it work.

What I personally loved about the film was that you didn’t glance over Miles Davis’ bitter personality. I loved the interviews with Frances Taylor, but it broke my heart that the creator of Kind of Blue forced his dancer wife to drop out of West Side Story. Miles was not an easy guy.

That’s putting it mildly. I think it was important that we tell that part of the story. I think what makes his story so rich and emotional there’s that dichotomy with Miles. The man that made some of the most beautiful music ever created and then was so rough for so many people. How do those things exist? Miles basically ruined Frances’ career by pulling her out of this show.

Yes! He was abusive to her, and after a few years they broke up. Her career had been ruined. I think one of the things that was so great for us while making the film was that Frances was so resilient and so beautiful and so funny in the film. You realize he tried but he couldn’t break her. I should say that Frances passed away Thanksgiving of last year. It was such a joy to be with Frances and interview her.

What do you hope people who don’t know Miles Davis will take away from the film and what do you hope people who do know Miles Davis will learn? One of the challenges of making any film, especially a film about Miles Davis, some people come in thinking there’s everything to know about Miles Davis. Some people come in and say "Miles who? Why’d you drag me to the theater?" You’ve got to walk that line and tell everybody something new and also be entertaining.

My mission in this film is partly to entertain. I don’t care how much you know about Miles. If you walk into this film and it’s two hours long you’re going to learn something new, or it’s going to be told to you in a different way. Certainly you’ve never been exposed to Frances. Just being exposed to Frances in and of itself is a trip. Part of the job is to entertain and frankly, that’s what we’re trying to do.

Miles Davis: The Birth of Cool is in select theaters. Click here

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