South Florida To March For Black Women On 20th Anniversary Of Million Woman March

Women took to the streets in droves on the morning of January 21, 2017, in what was positioned to be a worldwide effort to champion women’s rights and protest our daily struggles and lived experiences.

In a country that continues to make it perilous to be female in far too many spaces, women and men, and even children from all walks raised their fists and picket signs in the name of equality, protection and liberty, making the rally the largest inaugural protest recorded in U.S. history.

READ: 10 Responses To The #WomensMarch That Clap Back At White Feminism

Like many political movements of the past, however, this year’s Women’s March on Washington was tainted with the historical erasure of  black and brown women and our varied (unique) forms of oppression. If you partook in any major city around the U.S., as a women of color, you soon found yourself conflicted aligning yourself with the very people (read: white, middle class women) who not only helped usher in the Trump Era, but have perpetually failed to recognize you.

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CREDIT: Facebook

In what marks the 20th anniversary of the Million Woman March that took place on the Benjamin Franklin Park Way in Philadelphia, South Florida is marching for black women off all walks, ethnicities and gender identities.

READ: Alicia Keys, Janelle Monáe And More Attend Women’s March In Washington D.C.

“Join the Miami Workers Center and several other community organizations as we center the experiences of Trans Black women, Black women struggling to pay rent, Black girls who are “pretty for a dark-skinned girl,” reads the Eventbrite description, “Black women who are under appreciated and underpaid, undocumented immigrant Black women living in fear of deportation, Black women with children in failing schools, Black women unable to bear children, Black women with visible and unvisible disabilities, Black women survivors of violence, Black women who do not have time to cry, Black women who make a way out of no way… all Black women.”

For more information about the march, visit here. To help with the financial burden of the march, visit here. To support as a local artist, visit here.