G Herbo Discusses Debut Album ‘Humble Beast,’ Tupac And Conversations With Fans (Watch)

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Some rappers are skillful at rapping about the dangers of the underworld. And that’s cool. But some of these MCs lie. And they’re good at telling lies. But it’s an up close and personal experience when listeners actually believe rappers who offer unique tales of the unforgiving corners. Enter Chicago native G Herbo, a honest-to-god lyricist who is refreshingly unclichéd.

READ: Interview: G-Herbo Wants To Buy His Chicago Neighborhood One Day

G Herbo’s lucid exploits about his East Side neighborhood come from a place of frustration with living in the abyss of poverty. His honest aggressiveness is the result of shootouts, gang violence and the murders of foes as well as Herbo’s close friends such as Fazo and Kobe. In fact, the Chi-city rapper dedicated two mixtapes to his deceased brothers with Welcome to Fazoland and Ballin’ Like I’m Kobe, respectively.

After releasing a host of projects since stepping in the game back in 2014, the rapper born Herbert Randall Wright has managed to gain a solid core following by continuing to tell important yet harrowing stories that many black youths can relate to. His growth is evident. Despite his removal from his 150 Rock Block (due to his success as a rapper), Herbo is able to rap about street issues without recycling the same tired stories. Not an easy feat.

READ: A Conversation With Chicago’s Lil Herb About His New Music, Dipset And Dream Collabo

With his debut album, Humble Beast, a few days away, G Herbo sat with VIBE to discuss his new project, his study of the culture, the late Tupac, risking his life in the streets and missing studio sessions during the recording of his freshman mixtape, Welcome to Fazoland.

“The reason I say it’s my favorite [Welcome to Fazoland] is because it came out so good, and I ain’t even give a f**k about rap when I made that sh*t,” Herbo says. “I ain’t even care. I cared about rap, I wanted to rap, but I was in the streets. I was missing studio sessions, missing everything, high off drink, risking my life every day while I’m recording this sh*t. My homies getting killed, I’m coming to the studio the next day recording songs.”

During the second part of our interview, the 22-year-old shared his opinions of the different types of street guys one may encounter, and wanting to leave his fans with something of substance when he meets them.

“When people see me, I want to leave them with something. I’ve been out here in New York on some late-night sh*t at three, four in the morning in Times Square, talking to people for 40 minutes because they asking me questions,” Herbo says.

READ: G Herbo Releases ‘#S4MF2: Road To Humble Beast’ EP

With Humble Beast set to arrive on Sept. 22, the streets can finally exhale as one of their very own explains how thug life can actually make one unpretentious.

And we believe you, Herbo.

Tags: G Herbo