2017 NBA Finals - Game Five
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LeBron James Calls Donald Trump A "Bum"

LeBron James is standing in solidarity with Stephen Curry following Donald Trump's recent comment.

LeBron James is standing in solidarity with Stephen Curry following Donald Trump's recent comment. Given Trump's withdrawal of his White House invitation to the Golden State Warriors, James decided to weigh in on the matter in a viral tweet.

"U bum @StephenCurry30 already said he ain't going! So therefore ain't no invite," he wrote. Going to White House was a great honor until you showed up!"

Trump said it's an honor for a championship team to meet the president, and said Curry is "hesitating." The NBA champion previously said he planned to refrain from going to the White House, stating, "By acting and not going, hopefully that will inspire some change when it comes to what we tolerate in this country and what is accepted and what we turn a blind eye to."

Curry's teammate Kevin Durant also shared his thoughts on the president in a previous interview with ESPN. The Maryland native said he doesn't "respect who's in office right now," and "I don't agree with what he agrees with, so my voice is going to be heard by not doing that."

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Colin Kaepernick’s Team Sets The Record Straight About His NFL Career

Colin Kaepernick hasn’t given up on his dream of getting back in the NFL, per a statement released by his team on Thursday (Oct. 10). The 31-year-old athlete’s agent, Jeff Nalley, and public relations director addressed “false narratives” about the possibility of Kaepernick getting back in the league.

“There have been so many false narratives in the media regarding Colin, we believe it important to set the record straight, again,” the statement begins.

“Not a single team” has brought Kaepernick in for a workout since he walked away from the 49ers, although the Seattle Seahawks had him come in for a visit, the team didn’t work him out.

After filing a lawsuit accusing team owners of conspiring to blacklist him from the league Kaepernick, and his former 49ers teammate Eric Reid, reached a confidential settlement with the NFL in February.

Reid currently plays for the Carolina Panthers.

Nalley has reached out to all 32 NFL teams but received “little to no response” on Kaepernick, something that he’s never seen in his 25 years as an agent. He goes on to deny reports that Kaepernick set salary demands, and shares stats to prove that his client is “still good enough” to play football at the “highest level.”

The statement concludes, “In summary, it is difficult to think of another young player in NFL history with statistics and character as impressive as Colin’s not being given an opportunity to earn a spot on an NFL roster after what he has accomplished.”

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4 Things To Know About California's "Fair Pay to Play Act" That Benefits Collegiate Athletes

There's a new order on the horizon in the world of collegiate sports and it begins with California. On Monday (Sept. 30), the state's Gov. Gavin Newsom authorized the "Fair Pay to Play Act" that grants student-athletes the opportunity to profit off of their likeness and hire agents. That means a student at a California-based university or college can entertain endorsements without being penalized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The bill is set to go into effect in January 2023.

I’m so incredibly proud to share this moment with all of you. @gavinnewsom came to The Shop to do something that will change the lives for countless athletes who deserve it! @uninterrupted hosted the formal signing for SB 206 allowing college athletes to responsibly get paid. pic.twitter.com/NZQGg6PY9d

— LeBron James (@KingJames) September 30, 2019

The NCAA also issued a statement citing there's confusion brewing within the collegiate sports sphere. "As more states consider their own specific legislation related to this topic, it is clear that a patchwork of different laws from different states will make unattainable the goal of providing a fair and level playing field for 1,100 campuses and nearly half a million student-athletes nationwide," the statement reads. In 2017, the NCAA surpassed $1 billion in revenue for the first time.

NCAA statement on Gov. Newsom signing SB 206: https://t.co/laV4aT1Cpo pic.twitter.com/sCOOYZEkJd

— NCAA (@NCAA) September 30, 2019

Here are four takeaways from California's foray into the world of collegiate sports.

What Restrictions Are Now Placed On The NCAA? This leaves the NCAA without the power to ban an athlete or their respective university from a competition. California's student-athletes will gain the opportunity to market their name and likeness "to outside bidders." Community colleges, however, remain exempt from the state's law.

Other States Plan To Get In On The Action: Earlier this month, Brooklyn, New York's Sen. Kevin Parker recently advocated for the state to mandate that colleges pay its athletes, citing equity as the main root. "These young people are adding their skill, talent and labor to these universities," Parker said per ESPN. "You don't need the shortcuts and the end-arounds because now we're providing some real support for these student-athletes." Parker's legislation would require a collegiate school's athletic department to disperse 15 percent of its yearly ticket revenue to its athletes.

Before California's bill, the NCAA allowed tennis players to receive prize money no more than $10,000. Other student-athletes within the "Power 5" also are eligible to receive anywhere between $2,000-$4,000 in "cost-of-living stipends." The Power 5 conferences include SEC, Big Ten, Pac-12, ACC, and Big Twelve.

Here’s our recent segment on the law California’s governor just signed, which requires the state’s universities to allow college athletes to collect endorsement money. This sets up a huge showdown with the NCAA, which is now under pressure to allow ALL athletes the same rights. pic.twitter.com/mo5kstCVqT

— Rachel Nichols (@Rachel__Nichols) September 30, 2019

Professional Athletes Previously Voiced Concern Over The NCAA's Restrictions: In February 2018, LeBron James scrutinized the NCAA's longstanding practice of not compensating athletes and referred to it as a "corrupt" company following a string of college basketball recruiting investigations. James even produced a documentary on the NCAA that highlights the astronomical salaries paid to coaches and secret endorsements.

"I do know what five-star athletes bring to a campus, both in basketball and football. I know how much these college coaches get paid. I know how much these colleges are gaining off these kids," he said per ESPN. "I've always heard the narrative that they get a free education, but you guys are not bringing me on campus to get an education, you guys are bringing me on it to help you get to a Final Four or to a national championship, so it's just a weird thing."

While California's bill also allows athletes the right to seek out an agent, the NCAA tried to get ahead by implementing a rule stating agents who express interest in student-athletes looking to enroll in the NBA draft must have a three-year certification with the league, take a test at the organization's main office, and must've graduated with a bachelor's degree.

NCAA Believes California's Decision Will Blur The Lines Between Amateur And Professional Athletes: The Associated Press notes being a part of the NCAA is voluntary, meaning if the organization begins to impose bans or further restrictions on universities and colleges in California, those schools have the ability to part ways from the company and possibly form its own league. The NCAA took issue with the state's ruling stating the playing field will become uneven. “Right now, nearly half a million student-athletes in all 50 states compete under the same rules,” a statement reads. “This bill would remove that essential element of fairness and equal treatment that forms the bedrock of college sports.”

The organization reportedly asked California's legislatures to remain steady on passing the bill so that its committee can review its own mandate that allows collegiate athletes a similar opportunity.

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A view of the atmosphere at the Star-studded Adventure Ride hosted by Polaris Slingshot And RZR on September 12, 2019 in Tenmile, Oregon.
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Polaris' Slingshot And RZR Offer Unforgettable Behind-The-Wheel Experiences

Polaris is taking customers on a wild ride. The company behind more than 30 products including off-roading vehicles and snowmobiles offers up unforgettable experiences that cater to your inner adrenaline junky.

Earlier in the month, the powersports giant flew members of the press and social media influencers, including Snoop Dogg's son Cordell Broadus, rapper Bia and BMX rider Nigel Slyvester, to Eugene, Oregon for the Polaris All Out Adventure. The daylong event gave participants a behind-the-wheel experience with the Polaris RZR and Polaris Slingshot.

After being in business for more than 60 years, Polaris continues to expand its reach to include a diverse group of consumers. “[It's about] creating accessibility to power sports and an interest that maybe folks didn’t have before because they saw it as something that you had to be off in the woods [to do], or you have to be off in the snow,” Joey Lindahl- Marketing Manager, Customer Growth & Engagement told VIBE.

“We make all that stuff, too — but now this is another option and it is really something that we see resonate with a lot more people than maybe have been our other products in the past.” The company has seen “organic growth” among “young riders, women, and people of color,” added Lindahl.

Among the lineup of impressive creations, the Polaris Slingshot steals the show. The sleek, three-wheel autocycle reaches speeds of up to 130 mph and was designed by Tiger Bracy, Polaris' Senior Manager of Industrial Design.

Bracy has worked with Polaris for more than a decade and is among the small group of black designers in his field. And even after years in the business, Bracy still gets excited to see his designs go from paper to pavement.

“I’ve been doing it so long that I’m used to it,” Bracy shared with VIBE when asked of his reaction to seeing a Slingshot on the road. “I think the first time that I saw something [that I designed] it wasn’t on-road if was an off-road product. It wasn’t [about] seeing someone on it, it was it being manufactured and coming together. Because in my brain I can see this but it’s still on paper, once it's out and it’s there and people are enjoying it? [My] mind [is] blown.”

More customers have identified with the Slingshot than the company anticipated, which allows Polaris to learn more about a diversified group of buyers. Although the Slingshot doesn't have a specific target audience, it was designed to “reach a different buyer,” Bracy explained.

“It’s not for everybody,” he said. “It’s a polarizing vehicle in terms of how you drive it, how it looks, but we wanted to take that risk to go find a new area.”

See more in the video below.

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