Kehlani Calls For Afro-Indigenous Peoples To Reclaim Their Legacy

Like many black and brown peoples, R&B superstar Kehlani isn’t here for the celebration of Columbus Day. Instead, she feels people of color should reclaim their legacy and celebrate their resilience in surviving colonization from Europeans.

The 22-year-old songstress took to Instagram on Monday (Oct. 9) to denounce the highly controversial holiday, and speak her mind on who Christopher Columbus was.

READ: Los Angeles Will Celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day Instead Of Columbus Day

“When you celebrate Christopher Columbus you are celebrating rape, torture, the robbery of land and culture,” she wrote. “You are celebrating pain, encouraging abuse and abusers, saying it’s ok to take what isn’t yours, and destroy in the process.”

When you celebrate Christopher Columbus you are celebrating rape, torture, the robbery of land and culture. You are celebrating pain, encouraging abuse and abusers.. saying it’s ok to take what isn’t yours, and destroy in the process. CELEBRATE TODAY BY TELLING THE TRUTH. When entering any land, any space or even any practice, you must honor what & who came before you. If you are indigenous take some time to learn… to fully understand your right to land, medicine, connection & being. Know that the ancient ways of your people were & are so strong that people felt they had to separate you from it. Our power lies in connecting again, in reclaiming, in taking back our rites of passage & practice of healing. Happy to be in Los Angeles for this historical time, and remember.. NO ONE IS ILLEGAL ON STOLEN LAND. Give thanks! 🙏🏼✨ #indigenouspeoplesday art by @ernestoyerena

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In recent years, U.S. cities like Seattle, Denver, Albuquerque and Los Angeles have nixed the holiday, renaming it Indigenous Peoples Day.

READ: Indigenous Protesters Are Fighting For All Their Land

Kehlani also encouraged her fans of Afro-Indigenous descent to look deep within themselves, and start nurturing their ancient healing practices and overall power as a people.

“Know that the ancient ways of your people were & are so strong that people felt they had to separate you from it. Our power lies in connecting again, in reclaiming, in taking back our rites of passage & practice of healing,” she continued. “Happy to be in Los Angeles for this historical time, and remember.. NO ONE IS ILLEGAL ON STOLEN LAND. Give thanks”