tyrese-dedicates-lets-get-it-on-to-daughter
Getty Images

Tyrese Dedicates A Modified Version Of "Let's Get It On" To His 10-Year-Old Daughter

While the 'Fast & Furious' actor sang some of the words to the classic Marvin Gaye song, many thought the song choice was awkward and inappropriate.

Tyrese's ex-wife Norma Gibson filed a restraining order against the singer/actor after she alleged he physically abused her and their 10-year-old daughter. Since then, the Fast & Furious actor has reportedly taken extreme measures to show Shayla he loves her. Whether it be wearing a hoodie that reads "Shayla Rocks!" or allegedly flying a banner over her school that stated "No matter what, daddy loves you, Shayla," the Black Rose artist is committed to showing his daughter how committed he is.

A judge has reportedly modified the restraining order and granted the 38-year-old permission to see his daughter. According to TMZ, Tyrese is allowed a six-hour monitored visit with Shayla. However, footage of Tyrese performing in Atlanta for their R&B Super Jam Saturday (Oct. 28) left many raising an eyebrow.

"I'm going to dedicate what I'm about to say to my baby, okay?" Tyrese said.

While Tyrese sang a modified version of Marvin Gaye's classic "Let's Get It On" many thought the song choice was inappropriate. One user said Tyrese was exhibiting the characteristics of someone having a public meltdown. While others wondered why of all the songs written ever, Marvin Gaye's "Let's Get It On" was the one he choose.

Are people overreacting? Or is Tyrese doing the most? Sound off in the comments.

From the Web

More on Vibe

Brando

NEXT: Emotional Oranges Sing Tales Of Modern Love Behind Mysterious Blinds

As of late, New York’s Brooklyn Steel has acted as a safe space for budding performers of the R&B flavor to bring live music to the fans. On a brisk fall evening, fans of Emotional Oranges follow stickers that act as breadcrumbs to the venue. It’s a perfect treat for them given the anonymous nature of the presumed duo. Singles like the flirtatious “Motion” and “Personal” not only offer reasons to slide to the dance floor but an ode to their ability to marry disco blends, instrumental productions, and 808s, resulting in a very special cocktail of modern R&B.

When members known as "A" and "V" take the stage in front of the sold-out crowd, they’re imaginative in every way. The venue turns into a mood ring of sorts as their silhouettes are met with lavender hues during “Built That Way,” blue for “Your Best Friend Is A Hater” and a somber red for “Corners of My Mind.” They may be a wonder, but the stories heard on the aforementioned tracks reflect the ins and outs of modern love. Ins being the adrenaline of meeting someone new in a two-star bar and the outs being the situationship that follows it. Fantasies of what love should be and reflections of what it could have been flooding the Emotional Oranges' debut project The Juice Vol. 1, giving listeners honest storytelling. It’s something producer/engineer “A” and female vocalist “V” pride themselves on.

“I think a lot of our music stems from real experience, not just other people’s stories, but our lives as well,” V says a few moons later in the VIBE office. Their most daring songs like “Hold You Back,” a back and forth about a woman falling for another girl while in relations with a guy came from a simple conversation between the two. “Hold You Back” as well as songs from their newly released follow-up, The Juice Vol. 2 aren’t built for the radio or a speakeasy, but for listeners who enjoy a bit of spritz in their R&B.

“It goes back to the expectations,” A says. “People get in the studio and it's a writer setup with another writer. The expectation is a song for the club, or a deep song or something for the “quintessential” album, but with us, there's none of that.”

Due to their anonymity, Emotional Oranges don’t worry about playing up their personality or staying in a sound bubble. Their mysterious allure comes with creative freedom. “I think it actually helps us do things faster,” V continues. “Vol. 2 was written in two weeks. A lot of the production takes 5, 6, 7 months, but in terms of ideation that process was super fast.”

The Juice Vol. 2 continues to toy with their style of intentional R&B; songs like “Don’t Be Lazy” jump right to the punch. “Let me lick and taste it,” the two sing with other tracks like “West Coast Love” pays homage to East Coast legends A Tribe Called Quest’s 1990 jam, “Can I Kick It.” There’s also “Iconic,” that toys with the sounds of Miami’s 90s underground. Produced by Dante Jones of THEY., the track aligns with the Los Angeles-based duo's mission of keeping their music free-flowing.

A and V of Emotional Oranges came to be in 2017 but the group moved as a collective comprised of “normal people” in 2015. Those people included songwriters and producers, leading many to wonder just who made up the group. Speaking to Noisey earlier this year, EO shared how their debut single “Motion” doesn’t feature V, but another vocalist. "If you listen real carefully, on our first single ‘Motion,’ that’s our first singer. She's an A&R at a big label. The rest of the songs are our new singer," they said at the time. “We've all worked regular jobs. We're very regular people. And we came together for one unified vision. I tried a lot of things in my life that didn't work. I tried to put so many things together. It just came down to authenticity.” Some of the things that didn’t work were trying to bend towards a label's passive-aggressive suggestions.

“When you have labels telling you who you are as an artist, that doesn't work,” A says. “It might work for a song but not for the longevity of your career.” He also shared how artists should be mindful of the relationships they have with a label, a notion that might not be on the mind of a green artist. “It's not the idea of a label it’s the idea of someone telling you that you have to compromise your integrity in order to get to the next level, you have to eliminate that and eliminate the expectations of it to make money off of this tomorrow,” he says.“But for us, I think it's very liberating. We’re releasing music we love and not being given a deadline or told what to wear. To free yourself from all these things has been the most liberating for us.”

With their loyal and true fan base known as the “citrus squad,” Emotional Oranges got to experience just how deep their influence has been. Their fan merch with the simple words “emotional” across the right side of their tees and sweatshirts were later seen in the stores of Forever 21 without any credit. “I take it as a compliment,” V says. “They always copy what’s hot.”

Merch:

 

View this post on Instagram

 

- 🧡 Emotional Oranges 🧡 🍊 9/14/19 🍊 Tags: #emo #grunge #makeup #edgy #emomakeup #grungemakeup #dark #aesthetic #tumblr #tumblraesthetic #outfits #black #bandtees #rock #music #skinnyjeans #selfie #mirrorselfie #smokeyeye #eyeliner #alternative #alternativeaesthetic #sad #dark #nepali #canadian #explore #explorepage #emotionaloranges #chiiild @hellochiiild @emotionaloranges

A post shared by Rae 🏳️‍🌈 (@x_raepanda_x) on Sep 17, 2019 at 3:07pm PDT

Forever 21:

They’re also one of the artists who provide a phone number for their fans. It’s not a way of funneling data for EO, but instead, a way for them to get to know their squad. “Even at the shows, they’ll come backstage and tell us their names. One time, there were four different couples in Toronto who bought meet and greet tickets twice," V recalls. "They spent $150 each twice in three months. They all said, ‘Do you remember us?’ and it’s like, ‘Of course!’ Moments like that have been great.”

“They’ll also tell their family members to come to shows,” V adds while asking A about a Texas-based fan who shared his love for EO with his twin sister from Durham. That curious person then became a fan, stretching the Emotional Oranges family a little further.

As their music continues to reach lovers of soul and today’s modern R&B, Emotional Oranges are holding on to the elements that actually matter. From storytelling, funky beats and universal perspectives, they have a gift of making it all work. “I think we haven't pigeon-holed ourselves, or put ourselves in a box,” V ironically says as she toys with an orange from our snack area. “I think we kind of live outside the box. We can really play, which I think is fun since where we go from here is up to us.”

Continue Reading
Courtesy of Skip Marley

Skip Marley Talks Working With H.E.R. On New Single "Slow Down" And Living In A Genreless World

Skip Marley's new single "Slow Down" is dripping with good intentions. There's a sultry yet soothing flirtatious energy between the singer and his very special guest, Grammy-winning singer H.E.R. The two complement each other well as they share lyrics of budding love.

Produced by Rykeyz, the track released Friday (Nov. 8) plays towards Skip's daily affirmations. "Love is limitless. Love has no boundaries. Love is almighty," he tells VIBE. "When you speak of it, it's very almighty. It's a luxury because it really has no limits. I'm a love warrior. I might keep that title for something (Laughs)." The singer-songwriter takes this energy into every song he's created. From his debut single "Lions" to collaborations with Katy Perry, Major Lazer and uncle Damian Marley, the grandson of Bob Marley is keeping the family's musical lineage strong and rooted in love.

Skip says the creative process of "Slow Down" came together quite smoothly. After writing the song with Nasir Atweh and Bibi Bourelly, he wanted a collaborator who could share his musical and loving energy. Enter H.E.R., who brought a dose of special lyrics and charm to the single. "As soon as I heard the [completed] track I was in love. I just grateful that she jumped on the track with me, it means a lot," Skip says.

Below, we chat with Skip about "Slow Down," how he manages to remain genreless and what we can expect from his debut studio album.

__

I love every nook and cranny of "Slow Down." How did the collaboration with H.E.R. come to be? 

When I made the song, I was looking and wondering who could be a feature and then I thought of H.E.R. because I love her vibe and her energy really. As soon as I heard the [completed] track I was in love. I just grateful that she jumped on the track with me, it means a lot.

I saw you both shared a stage recently. 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Big tings a gwan 🙏🏿Slow Down come FRIDAY ✊🏿 @hermusicofficial

A post shared by Skip Marley (@skipmarley) on Nov 4, 2019 at 7:45am PST

We did! She was performing with Ms. Lauryn Hill at the Hollywood Bowl. I was able to be a part of it and be able to sing. We were actually able to premiere the song there. That was the first time we played it live so that the moment was really nice. We were asked to sing a cover of "Turn Your Lights Down Low" too. That was crazy.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

let Jah moon come shining in 🌑

A post shared by Skip Marley (@skipmarley) on Oct 30, 2019 at 7:08am PDT

What I enjoy the most about your music is that there's no set genre. We talked to Damian Marley about this and he shared how important to be genreless.

Yes, you have to follow the spirit. You're free to create.

How important is that to you these days? 

Well, for me, it's always been important from the start. I just love music because it's seasoned with expression you know. I've always thought that I can connect with any genre of music as long as I feel a message or music you know, or like, the beats or whatever, you know. I've always been like that since learning how to play instruments and knowing hip-hop, reggae and the blues. It's just about knowing yourself and reaching your goals.

Who is someone from the past–living or dead–you'd like to work with? 

Jimi Hendrix, B.B. King, my grandfather (Laughs), James Brown, Jesus. The list is endless.

Can we expect a video to "Slow Down?"

Yes, we shot the video for it and I'm dropping an acoustic version of "Slow Down." It's more heartfelt. After that, we're looking towards the project which is very, very soon. We're thinking of January.

That's the best way to welcome the new decade. No pun intended but what is the vibe of the "Slow Down" video? 

The vibe is very street, very rural you know? There's a nice connection between a guy and girl, catching eyes for the first time. A lot of things happen and the next thing you know she's gone and I'm gone. I'm saying, 'Slow down, be in the moment with me. I saw you from across the room and I just had to say something.'

How do you view love these days? 

Love is limitless. Love has no boundaries. Love is almighty. When you speak of it, it's very almighty. It's a luxury because it really has no limits. I'm a love warrior. I might keep that title for something (Laughs).

Lastly, what can you share with us about the album? Is it a combination of songs you've been sitting on and new recordings? 

It's a bit of both. It's really trial and error with music. It's picking and choosing while fine-tuning the ones you really love. You'll know when it's right. There's no other way than right. You can't go left.

Continue Reading
Getty Images

Lil Rel Howery's Distaste For R. Kelly Stems From Working On The Set Of 'Trapped In The Closet'

Lil Rel Howery's acting journey kicked off in a very odd way thanks to his encounter with R. Kelly. The comedian paid a visit to Jimmy Kimmel Live! Wednesday (Nov. 6) where he looked back on his early days in Hollywood and how he lost respect for R. Kelly over the years.

The two crossed paths when Rel worked as a stand-in for Michael K. Williams' character on Trapped In The Closet. While on the set, he met another stand-in who happened to be a backup dancer for R. Kelly. The two had an enjoyable conversation but the woman refused to talk to him the next day. Her reason was very similar to the sentiments heard by other women who have crossed the singer's path.

"There was another stand-in, a young lady that was actually one of his background dancers too for a couple of his tours. We were just talking the whole time, getting to know each other, laughing, and having a good time," he recalled. "But every time she laughed, I found him just, like, staring at me. So we come back to set the next day right and she's not talking to us at all, right? At all!"

"I pulled her to the side and I'm like 'Yo, did I do something?' and she was like 'Nah, he doesn't want me talking to y'all' and I was like 'Who?' and she's like 'Robert!'" he added. "So she didn't talk to us the rest of the time we were filming it and it was just, like, it was just crazy and I remember him smirking about it."

But that wasn't the only time the two were in the same place. During a birthday party for the late John Singleton, Rel rejected an invite to meet R. Kelly.

"I guess he wanted to meet me and he sent somebody to me and we were all in this VIP area . . . 'Man, I'm good,'" he said. "That's a true story. I'm like 'I'm good' and the thing about it is, it wasn't even about the allegations with me. He was so extra like that sometimes and I ain't like that. Everybody knows I'm from the West Side of Chicago and I own who I am. That's too much, bro. Just come speak to me, fam."

Rel is currently promoting his HBO comedy special, Live In Crenshaw. The special debuts November 23 at 10 pm ET.

Watch the interview below.

Continue Reading

Top Stories