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15 Kendrick Lamar Quotes That Showcase His Musical Authenticity

K. Dot remains as one of the realest MCs in the rap game. 

Since Kendrick Lamar became the poster boy of West Coast rap thanks to hard-hitting rhymes on projects like his 2012 major label debut Good Kid, m.A.A.d. City, last year's masterpiece To Pimp a Butterfly --- and of course 2017's DAMN, it has become clear the 29-year-old's wisdom extends beyond the mic. The Grammy Award winner has a flair for making a statement, especially in the rare times he gives interviews.

As Lamar's visceral and raw lyrics touch on the experiences of a kid growing up in Compton as well as a Black man in America today, the SoCal emcee manages to keep his cool and walk on the path of consciousness. Below are some of Kung Fu Kenny's wisest words on remaining true to yourself.

Billboard (2017)
"It’s a personal connection [with fans] and the experience of freedom [with DAMN]. When I say “freedom,” it means creating, being able to do what I want, to where you feel liberation from it. They already have a personal connection, because I’m talking about issues in my music that not only I go through, but the audience is going through."

Ebony (May 2015)
"If I can use my platform to carry on a legacy and talk about something that’s real, I have to do that, period."

Complex (October 2012)
"These songs, they come naturally for me to write off the experiences I grew up with and the things I been around. It was just what we were going through. It’s easy for me to write [real] stories rather than making up a crazy story.”

Spin (October 2012)
“You can’t take a person out of their zone and expect them to be somebody else now that they in the record industry. It’s gonna take years. Years of traveling. Years of meeting people. Years of seeing the world.”

The Fader (October 2015)
"I just want to be myself and not have any fraudulent points. It'll never be anybody from where I'm from that can put out a faulty statement about who I am or what I've done or how I've grown up. You'll never be able to do that, because everything is 100 percent real. People closest to me know it, and people on the outskirts know it. I always wanted to just keep that authentic, never want to have any weak points in my career, or in my character and who I really am.

Noisey (March 2016)
"It's a hundred percent real. I don’t even think I can make music where it's fabricating a story that's not mine. From Compton I could've easily came out and said, 'I did this, I did that, I killed a whole bunch of n---as…' Just giving out fact where I'm from. That ain't me. I’d rather talk about my reality."

The Guardian (June 2015)
"I find myself to be quite confident as a person but you’re going to have that piece of doubt in the back of your head because we’re human. We all have it. It’s just I like to address it and not keep it bottled in, because I don’t know what it could turn into.”

Coveteur (March 2016)
“Personally, I just like a more classic, comfortable feel. You know, it just represents my personality. It’s just a representation of who I am, another extension of what I represent and my own personality. Do what always represents you.”

Acclaim (October 2012)
"I don’t just wanna be a popular person, I want my music to always live because that’s what’s gonna drive your legacy."

TIME (December 2015)
"I want to continue to have something that’s not microwavable in a world today where our attention span is pretty much lost. We need something that we can hold on to, so in doing that, I’m [going to] continue to make the music I want to make and say the things I want to say, whether you agree with it or not."

2DopeBoyz (February 2016)
"You have to be confident enough to know that the message will get to the people around the world and they will understand it. That’s a gift that God [sic] put in me to continue to talk about these things. The message is bigger than the artist."

Interview Magazine (May 2013)
"I still know who I am and I haven't let everything consume me. But on the other end, I have to know when I'm me -- when I go out in public, to the person that sees me on TV and has a conception of who I am. That's the only catch. That's the flip side to it. But I think whatever pressure I feel all comes from me, from within. I always was that person who was hard on myself and challenged myself no matter what I was doing, whether it was passing third grade or playing basketball."

Interview Magazine (May 2013)
"I try my best to stay away from social media as much as possible. [Laughs] When you go on your Twitter or look down your Timeline and it's all great positivity -- I love that. But at the same time, it can really divert you from what your purpose is or what you're trying to do. And I've seen artists get caught up in that. I've seen some of my friends get caught in that. Whether you're a small celebrity or a grand celebrity, it really triggers something in your brain, seeing all that stuff ... So I'm real aware of it."

Mass Appeal (April 2015)
"My new meaning for "keepin’ it gangsta" is totally different from the usual. It’s really about takin’ care of your family, handlin’ your business, and puttin’ positive energy out there where everybody can benefit from it, not just yourself."

GQ (October 2016)
“I used to consider the listener. But now I'm in a space where if I'm not inspired, I can't really do the music. I can't feel it. I put in enough hours to be able to pen a hundred-bar verse on the spot at any given moment. But for me to actually feel an idea, it has to come from me. And a lot of times, I have to block out different needs and wants just for my own selfish reasons. But at the end of the day, it comes out where, whether you like it or not, you know it comes from a real place. It's gonna feel unapologetic, uncompromising, and it's gonna feel me.”

This story originally appeared on Billboard.com.

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Courtesy of Inayah Lamis

Premiere: Inayah Lamis Busts The Windows Out Of Toxic Love In Visuals For "Best Thing"

Breakups are never easy but let Inayah Lamis heal your heart with her cheeky video for "Best Thing." Inspired by true events, the Houston native sings about bitter feelings about love gone astray.

The emotional ballad is simple in production thanks to the presence of an acoustic guitar, allowing Lamis to show off her vocal chops. Reminiscent of 2000s R&B gems like "I Wished You Loved Me" by Tynisha Keli and recent classics like Tink's "Treat Me Like Somebody," Lamis finds the right words that almost anyone can relate to.

"The track “Best Thing” was birthed from a realtime heartbreak," she tells VIBE. "I went into the lab and wrote it while I was ending a relationship that had a strong hold over me. I literally cried in the booth as I was singing it. My hopes are that every woman or man that has been emotionally broken and taken for granted by a lover will feel comfort in knowing that leaving was the best thing they ever did for themselves."

Thanks to her around the way aura, the video plays off her personality with the presence of "Smakie Lamis" taking Lamis out of her sad girl feels over her deceitful partner, allowing her to hop in the whip and bust out some car windows–even if it's not her beau's car. Directed by Michelle Parker, the video also plays up Lamis' Houston swag as she rides around town in a candy green whip.

The budding singer knows how important her songwriting plays a role in her relationship with fans. Lamis previously shared a bit of her writing style with Refinery29, while opening up about the importance of body positivity.

"Anytime something impacts my life, I write it down and make a song out of it," she said. In her previous visuals for "Suga Daddy," the singer turned up the sexy for a good reason. "I've displayed my confidence as a chunky girl in this video. So many people have things to say about curvy, bigger girls. I feel like we're in a space now where we're able to finally have a voice and be free, and still be sexy. Particularly with the wardrobe, I wanted to show some skin, to show those curves, those back rolls, those fat little pockets I got underneath my chin and shit. I wanted to make sure I displayed that and rocked the hell out of it, confidently."

Lamis is gearing up to release her debut EP S.O.L.A.R. (Storytelling Over Lyrics and Rhymes) on Dec. 13. The singer hopes to share more stories her fans will appreciate and the masses will adore. Her come-up is a digital grassroots movement thanks to her remake of Ella Mai's "Boo'd Up" in 2018 leading to her debut studio single  "N.A.S.," an acronym for "Ni**as ain't S**t."

 

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BEST THING CHALLENGE 🔥 -Stream/Download my new song BEST THING -DM me your videos -No instruments -No music -Just you & your voice -#Bestthingchallenge

A post shared by Aʅʅ I Nҽҽԃ Iʂ Oɳҽ Mιƈ... 🎤 (@inayah_lamis) on Nov 18, 2019 at 12:05am PST

Taking things up a notch, Lamis announced the #BestThingChallenge to welcome fellow sangers to show off their vocals.

Before diving into the challenge, enjoy the visuals for "Best Thing" below.

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Premiere: Lambo Anlo Praises Women Hustlers In 'Blac Chyna' Video

Stripper-turned-entrepreneur Blac Chyna is one of the more polarizing figures in black music and reality TV, but Washington DC artist Lambo Anlo pays homage to her in his new video.

On "Blac Chyna," Lambo uses melodic rhymes to tell the story of a woman who uses her hustle, her beauty and her body to go from "section 8 to a palace." He speaks from a place of admiration for her focus, and the visual is a one shot video that shows him playing piano as the backdrop for a crew of gorgeous women of different complexions.

"It's the story of a female who grew up in an impoverished environment, taking any step she can to get where she wants to be in life," Lambo Anlo told VIBE. "For the video, we wanted to showcase the various cultures and races of women that go through this same struggle."

"I wanted to make an intimate video that juxtaposes two different types of people in more of a veiled style than what's traditionally expected," director Dillon Dowdell told VIBE.

Yazid Britt, director for creative services and marketing at Rostrum Records, noted that instead of simply casting a lookalike of the song's namesake as the lead, they wanted to go deeper and connect with viewers.

"It was an easy suggestion to just place a literal version of Blac Chyna as the female lead, but in many cases people see themselves through celebrities and that's what we set out with director Dillon Dowdell. There is a Blac Chyna in every culture.”

Watch the video for "Blac Chyna" above.

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Jaden Smith Paints The City Pink "Again" In New Video

Jaden Smith released the brand new music visuals for his record, "Again," featuring his alter ego SYRE.  The song is taken from his latest album ERYS, which dropped earlier this year.

Here, in the new visuals, Jaden uses his typical pink-colored theme, as the video kicks off with him spray painting his pink car with his MSFTS imprint before breaking out into a dance on top of the car.

The rapper seems to be sporting a new triangle-shaped face tattoo on his right cheek, which is probably just for the video, and may or may not be a reference to that illuminati-pyramid he was building in his parents backyard.

In other Jaden Smith news, the actor is slated to play a young Kanye West in Omniverse, an anthology that examines perception through the eyes of Mr. West.

Watch the video above.

 

 

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