chamillionaire-michigan-family-1516384836 chamillionaire-michigan-family-1516384836
Getty Images

Chamillionaire Offers Financial Support to Michigan Man's Family After His Deportation

Chamillionaire extended a helping hand to the family of Jorge Garcia, who was recently deported.

Recently, two topics that one may never think of in tandem have crossed paths: Hakeem “Chamillionaire” Seriki and DACA. The rapper, best known for his 2005 hit, “Ridin’” may have been laying low for the past 13 years in terms of music, but he’s still active in other circles. He’s been navigating his way through the tech industry, saying very little while working on his plan to get wealthy, not rich, as he shared with Noisey last year. If you knew the background story for Seriki’s initial claim to fame, his retreat to Silicon Valley wouldn’t be too surprising at all.

The rapper is all about audience engagement, so he cut out the middleman and went straight to rewarding fans using gamification. For example, fans were rewarded with signed albums and merchandise for sharing his music videos, which essentially jettisoned the need for a record label and maximized his profits.

And he remained engaged. The Houston entrepreneur launched the Robin’s Heart Foundation for the victims of Hurricane Harvey last September. Seriki has resurfaced again to come to the aid of the family of 39-year-old Jorge Garcia, a man who was recently deported after 30 years in Michigan. The story has gotten a lot of attention since reporter Niraj Warikoo of Detroit Free Press covered the deportation extensively on Monday. Warikoo emphasized the ill-suited label, “criminal” as Garcia never had so much as a traffic ticket. If nothing else, the story is demonstrative of the Trump administration making good on their promise to zero in on “immigration reform.”

Having read the moving story, Seriki reached out directly to Warikoo with hopes that he could be put through to the Garcia family. Warikoo took a screenshot of the email and posted it to his Twitter, opening with, “This is not a joke,” embracing its incredibility.

But it's true—Warikoo had the receipts to show it. Needless to say, the tweet went viral, but that’s not exactly what Seriki had in mind.

“I assumed this would be a private conversation, and I was hoping that I would be connected to the family, but unfortunately, neither happened," Seriki said in an interview with Business Insider. "It looks like the story of this family's unfortunate situation is gaining some traction, so at the least, I'm happy to see their story getting the attention that it deserves."

Hopefully, Warikoo will connect Seriki with the Garcia family soon but he’s yet to supply a comment or status update on the matter.

From the Web

More on Vibe

Rich Fury/Getty Images for Fashion Nova

Cardi B Reportedly Plans To Trademark "Okurrr" Catchphrase

Cardi B continues to utilize all avenues of making longterm dividends. According to The Blast, the "Red Barz" rapper filed for a trademark of her infectious catchphrase "okurrr."

The news site states the mother-of-one will imprint the slogan on T-shirts, jackets, caps, dresses and other clothing items. She once described the phrase as a cold New York City pigeon, and it was featured in one of her first brand commercials with Pepsi that aired during the Super Bowl.

In a February 2019 cover story for Harper's Bazaar, Cardi B discussed her rise to fame and how her focus shifted from paying attention to gossip fodder to making longterm money moves that'll benefit her family.

"I feel like my life is a fairy tale and I'm a princess—rags to riches, people trying to sabotage. Before, I cared about everything—relationship, gossip," she said. "Now I don't feel like I have the time to please people. I don't care about anything anymore—just my career and my kid."

On the music side, the Bronx native recently released her collaboration with Bruno Mars titled "Please Me." The single serves as a follow-up to the remix of Mars' "Finesse" which took over the charts in 2018.

Continue Reading
Getty Images/Reddit

Producer brandUn DeShay Accuses Joey Bada$$ Of Failing To Pay For Beats

The migration of popular mixtapes from today's top rappers to streaming platforms has left room for error for those who produced the music we adore. This seems to be the case for Joey Bada$$, who has been accused of failing to pay for productions services by Chicago's brandUn DeShay.

DeShay, who also goes by the music alias of Ace Hashimoto, took to Reddit Wednesday (March 20) to share the lack of communication he's had with the Brooklyn's rapper camp over unpaid services. The songs in question are "School High" and "Last Cypher," tracks that were included on Pro Era's breakout compilation mixtape, Peep the Aprocalpyse. Originally released in 2012, the project featured members of the popular posse like Nyck Caution, Kirk Knight and the late Capital STEEZ.

Posted on the Hip Hop Heads channel, DeShay acknowledges the beats were free considering they were on free projects. With the move to platforms like Spotify, Tidal and Apple Music, the producer explained how he wasn't contacted for clearances or payment.

"I never asked for bread because technically no one was getting paid," he said. "Until recently (December 12/23/18) Joey re-released the PEEP the Aprocalypse mixtape on all streaming platforms. Therefore generating bread off streams and DID NOT ask my permission, did not do splits or even work out a deal to just buy my share of the publishing from me."

"I hate takin s**t like this public cuz usually I think that s**t is corny asf," he added. "But I'm still tryna avoid taking this to court to retrieve the [payment]. I hope Joey reaches back so we can figure this out... the "producer x rapper" relationship in Hip-Hop deserves some success stories."

Prior to his Reddit post, DeShay posted his frustrations on Twitter back in February.

https://twitter.com/acehashimoto/status/1098791440765743104

VIBE reached out to DeShay who declined to provide a statement on the matter. We also reached out to Joey, who hasn't responded at the time of the  DeShay, who was also an original member of Odd Future, has produced the early projects of numerous acts like SZA, Chance The Rapper and Curren$y.

DeShay went on to share how he had a proper business dealing with the late Mac Miller when it came to his debut mixtape, Macadelic.

"He contacted me first about “Aliens Fighting Robots” and sent me paperwork!!!," he said. "We agreed on a price, permissions, splits and that was it. Everyone went home happy and you can now stream Macadelic on Spotify rn. Mac Miller handled his business properly. Be like Mac Miller."

Like DeShay previously stated, the relationship between rappers and producers has always been rooted in miscommunications and questionable deals. Producers like Kenny Beats and Bangladesh have expressed their frustrations over unpaid beats, specifically Bangladesh when it comes to his work with Lil Wayne. With streaming becoming a profitable tool for all aspects of song creation, the relationship should be mended sooner than later.

Continue Reading
Hagen Hopkins

New Zealand Has Banned The Sale Of Semi-Automatic Guns And Riffles

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced Wednesday (March 20) the nation would no longer sell semi-automatic guns and riffles. The sweeping legislation went into effect one week after an Australian man opened fire and killed 50 Muslim men, women and children.

"Today I am announcing that New Zealand will ban all military-style semi-automatic weapons. We will also ban all assault rifles," Ardern said at a press conference.

Prime Minister Arden said the new law would take effect Wednesday (March 20) at 3 PM local time and said dealers "should now cease" selling the guns.

"We will ban all high-capacity magazines. We will ban all parts with the ability to convert semi-automatic or any other type of firearm into a military-style semi-automatic weapon. We will ban parts that cause a firearm to generate semi-automatic, automatic or close to automatic gunfire," she continued.

The prime suspect in the attack reportedly obtained a gun license in 2017 and began purchasing more guns in the most following.

"This is just the beginning of the work we need to do," Ardern said.

The prime minister also noted that there are many in New Zealand who obtained their weapons legally and haven't used them for violence. She said a buyback program will be implemented at local police stations ensuring gun owners receive proper compensation for their weapon. Penalties will be put in place for those who don't participate.

The program may cost between $100 million and $200 million, but Prime Minister Arden says it's necessary "to ensure the safety of our communities."

Continue Reading

Top Stories