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Haiti's Ambassador To The U.S. Responds To Donald Trump's Controversial Statements

There are very few things that the POTUS can do to surprise the world now. 

There are very few things that the POTUS can do to surprise the world now. The entirety of the presidency (almost a year, now) has been quite reflective of his beliefs which are, most often, in direct opposition to general opinion. But overt statements of xenophobia are still disturbing as proven by the latest Trump “scandal.” The statement, many agree, is characteristic of him for all of its impulsivity but still difficult to stomach when examining foreign affairs.

In a private White House meeting on Thursday (Jan. 11), President Donald Trump reportedly remarked that Haiti and African nations are “sh*thole countries.” The reaction was prompted by a request for protection of immigrants from Haiti, African nations, and El Salvador as part of a bipartisan immigration plan. “Why are we having all these people from sh*thole countries come here?” he reportedly asked. “Why do we need more Haitians? Take them out.”

Journalist Yamiche Alcindor spoke directly with Haiti’s ambassador to the U.S., Paul Altidor. Appearing on MSNBC, Alcindor told Rachel Maddow, “Haiti is taking formal steps to let President Trump know they are upset.”

Alcindor further discussed the frustrations of a perplexed Altidor who brought up the history of Haitian relations with the U.S. Volunteers from the country fought alongside the U.S. in the Revolutionary War.

In the Oval meeting, Trump went on to suggest that the country should be negotiating the entry of more immigrants from places like Norway whose prime minister he met with on Wednesday (Jan. 10).

Apparently, President Trump’s reaction to the upcoming deal left Congress members from both parties in shock, if not for the statement itself, then for the flippancy with which he declared it. Senator Dick Durbin of Illinois spoke on his bewilderment, calling the language used, “heartbreaking.”

The statement echoes one reportedly made last year about Haitians having AIDS and Nigerians over-occupying America, never returning to their “huts.”

When word got out, Trump rose to his own defense immediately, tweeting: “The language used by me in the DACA meeting was tough, but this was not the language used.” Later in the morning (Jan. 12), he deflected the blame, tweeting: “Never said anything derogatory about Haitians other than Haiti is, obviously, a very poor and troubled country. Never said “take them out.” Made up by Dems. I have a wonderful relationship with Haitians. Probably should record future meetings - unfortunately, no trust!”

Late last year, Trump's administration put an end to a temporary residency program given to Haitian immigrants, permitting 60,000 Haitian citizens to live and work in the U.S. safely after a magnitude-7 earthquake in 2010. This does nothing for the proof of his "wonderful relationship" with Haiti, unfortunately.

Although he has repeatedly hammered into the heads of the people that he’s no racist or xenophobe, he’s uttered slurs since his election and his supporters have done the same. Many have pleaded the POTUS’ case, too, suggesting repeatedly that his election was not about racism but, wasn’t it? It marked the vulnerability exhibited by whites when a black man stepped in to lead the free world for eight years. “Post-racial” got too close for comfort. And the speeding car left its drivers behind.

Officials from Kenya, South Africa, Nepal, and Mexico all had a few words for Trump, proving that the acknowledgment of human rights has not seized to exist in any place but the White House.

If nothing else, this is a confirmation of the POTUS’ transparency.

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Despite the iconic items being nixed from the museum, items gifted to AIDS victim Ryan White by Jackson will remain on display. The song ‘Gone Too Soon’ was written after White died in 1990. The young boy idolized and befriended Jackson as he battled his illness.

“Ryan’s family found Michael Jackson’s kindness to them to be an important part of Ryan’s story, and the pictures of Michael displayed in that exhibit will always be an integral part of the Ryan White story,” the museum continued.

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Additional assets belonging to McFarland were deemed "untraceable" by authorities. However, Vulture reports that in court papers, feds were able to obtain a few important things. "$240,000 in a bank account" was found, as well as “two large boxes containing Fyre-branded T-shirts, sweatshirts, shorts and other clothing items that were intended for sale at the Fyre Festival,” per court filings.

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