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Post Malone Continues To Ruffle Feathers: "There’s A Struggle Being A White Rapper"

GQ sat down with Post Malone for a new interview. 

As the Post Malone interviews continue to flood the Internet in 2018, he made some more comments that aren't sitting well with certain rap crowds. While talking to GQ, the New York-native discussed his desire to be known more than just a "white rapper," and to be taken seriously in his musical abilities outside of his sing-rap style of music.

READ: Post Malone Drops ‘Rockstar’ Latin Remix Featuring Nicky Jam & Ozuna

After speaking on his own personal struggles as a "white rapper," the rap Internet exploded on him per usual.

Read the excerpt from GQ below:

“I definitely feel like there’s a struggle being a white rapper. But I don’t want to be a rapper. I just want to be a person that makes music,” he says. “I make music that I like and I think that kicks ass, that I think the people who fuck with me as a person and as an artist will like.” He sighs.

Do you see that it’s political to be a black rapper?

“Yeah, yeah!” he says. “I mean…shit.”

And you also recognize that there are separate struggles that go along with race, right?

“Yeah,” he says, “of course.”

READ: Post Malone On Hip-Hop: “Who The F**k Am I To Tell You Don’t Listen To This”

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New Music: Rah-C Completes A Creative Rebirth With Flashy "Whole Life" Single And Video

The life of a creative can be a long-winding journey, full of various twists, turns, pitfalls, and alternate routes along the terrain. Many artists have attempted to stick to the narrow paths with the least resistance, but Rah-C is a 23-year-old promising prospect that's more comfortable taking the road less traveled and walking to the beat of his own drum.

Born in Queens, NY, where he spent his formative years, Rah's mother later moved him and his brother upstate to Accord, NY, due to his father "getting into some drugs and some dumb shit he shouldn't have been getting into." Despite the split, Rah's father remained a presence and influence in his life, helping introduce him to the arts at a young age through his own creative endeavors. "My dad was a musician, he passed away when I was 12, 13," Rah-C tells VIBE via phone. "But he was always playing guitar and always had music in the house so I always kind of grew up with that sort of mentality."

Around age 15, Rah-C, who had been bitten by the rap bug, began uploading songs to SoundCloud, albeit with a throwback, lyrical approach that showcased his talents as a raw spitter. "I was really trying to push forward with being an emcee and do all that," he says of that period. "I came up just strictly rapping and opening shows and was able to open up for DMX and Mobb Deep and I was really trying to be on my boom-bap, sample-heavy rap shit for a long time.

Sharing stages with some of the greatest rap artists of all-time and making show-stealing freestyle exhibitions on programs like Sway in the Morning helped bolster his reputation as a force to be reckoned with, however, he noticed himself veering into new creative directions along the way, where he felt compelled to explore his range as a vocalist and hone in on instrumentation as opposed to crate-digging, an evolution he says was purely happenstance. "I was gaining more confidence in my ability to sing and my ability to play instruments cause a lot of that, I didn't know how to do really for years," he explains. "And then I wanted to obviously explore that. I did so many songs sampling stuff and so many different styles of hip-hop production that I just was like, 'all right, I wanna try something else.'" 

 

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Wishing u all happiness 🌍 dark times show the worst of people and it’s easy to take this all for granted. This is what I do every morning to start my day right (water too) #guitar

A post shared by Rah-C (@rahclyrical) on Jul 12, 2020 at 10:47am PDT

The latest result of this experimentation is Rah-C's new single, "Whole Life," a pulsating, mid-tempo ditty that finds the multi-talent shooting his best shot at a potential companion atop a synth-heavy backdrop. The song, which will not be included on Rah-C's forthcoming debut album, finds him drawing from the slick lyricism of his past years and melding it with a melodic sensibility that's tailor-made for crossover success. "I was working during quarantine and this song...I was really just trying to make something fun and upbeat," Rah shares. "I was trying to get in rhythm with some more dance, rhythmic-disco sorta stuff and I was just trying my hand at all that to take my mind off everything that was happening outside."

Produced by Rah-C, with additional production by frequent collaborator Identite Crisis, "Whole Life" is the first step toward the unveiling of his debut album, which is slated to arrive in October 2020. With three more single releases planned between now and then, Rah-C, who lists The Flaming Lips, Paul Simon, and Kendrick Lamar as his three biggest musical influences, is primed to close out what has been a tumultuous year on a high note while getting the public familiar with his wide-range of talents. And with his propensity to veer off course, according to him, it'd be safe to assume that this creative pivot won't be his last. 

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Drake Debuts “Laugh Now Cry Later” Feat. Lil Durk

Champagne Papi hit fans with his second single in a matter of months.  “Laugh Now, Cry Later” arrived on Friday (Aug. 14) along with a cameo-heavy music video.

In the visual, Drake lives out his dream of being a professional athlete, complete with an oversized “draft day” suit (à la LeBron James in 2003). The 33-year-old rapper also shows off his range as both a dramatic actor (he sheds a tear, or two) and comedic actor.

Drizzy tapped director Dave Meyers for the music video, which features appearances from Kevin Durant, Marshawn Lynch, and Odell Beckham.

According to Drake's Instagram, “Laugh Now Cry Later” will appear on his forthcoming studio album, Certified Lover Boy.

 

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Laugh Now Cry Later off my next studio album CERTIFIED LOVER BOY 👌🏽 video link in bio

A post shared by champagnepapi (@champagnepapi) on Aug 13, 2020 at 9:02pm PDT

Drake’s last single, “Toosie Slide,” seemed tailored for the TikTok era and quickly shot to the top of the Billboard charts. “Laugh Now Cry Later” will likely make its way to the TikTok crowd, but the song offers a celebratory anthem perfect for the club, and other post-pandemic shenanigans.

Peep the music video below.

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Watch Ciara Celebrate Black Excellence In “Rooted” Video

Ciara connects to her roots and celebrates Black excellence in the music video for “Rooted.” Released on Thursday (Aug. 13), the up-tempo track, featuring Ester Dean, plays as a love letter to Blackness and a reminder that “everything you need to survive and thrive is rooted in you.”

The music video was filmed just two days before Cici gave birth to son, Win Wilson, and is the latest release under her record label, Beauty Marks Entertainment. A portion of the song’s proceeds will go to support Grantmakers for Girls of Color, a philanthropic organization “dedicated to cultivating investments in support of girls of color (Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian and Pacific American) in the United States.”

The inspiring music video ends with a note of motivation from Ciara, “To all my Young Rosa’s and Young Luther’s keep marching. Don’t stop fighting for what you believe in. To all my Black Queens and Kings, continue to plant and spread seeds of love, hope and pride in your tribe. Everything you need to survive and thrive is rooted in you. Stay rooted.”

Watch the music video for  “Rooted” below.

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