DJ-Broadus
Family Of DJ Broadus

Family Of Florida Man Killed In Execution-Style Shooting Demands "Honest" Police Investigation

Dominic "DJ" Broadus was shot in the back of the head three times. 

The family of an unarmed Florida man who died in an execution-style shooting earlier in the month, are demanding that authorities arrest the person who pulled the trigger.

On the afternoon of Feb. 3, Dominic Jerome “D.J.” Broadus II, a 31-year-old Jacksonville native described as a “storyteller” who was “loved”, “loyal”, and a “great dad,” was found dead in the back of a home located at Southern States Nursery Road outside of Macclenny, Fla.

Although Broadus’ family isn’t “100 percent” sure of what happened to him, the fact remains that he was unarmed and shot “three times” in the head, “at close range.”

“Initially they told us nothing,” Chioma Iwuoha, Broadus’ cousin, shared with VIBE of how authorities in Baker County handled the investigation. “That’s why we made a call to the community, because police weren’t answering our questions.”

Broadus’ father, Dominic Jerome Broadus Sr., identified his son via a photo shown to him by authorities. The family didn’t physically see his body until three days after he was killed, Iwuoha said. She also pointed out that Broadus’ car was towed after he was killed, and that his father had to pay $330 to get it back.

At approximately 3:45 p.m., officers responded to a call of a shooting at the home where they found Broadus' body in the back of the residence, according to reports from police and the medical examiner.

Also at the home was Gardner Kent Fraser, the son of a former Florida sheriff’s deputy. Fraser was  “escorted” to the sheriff’s office where he was questioned and released.

While Broadus was considered an “outsider” in Baker County, Fraser is a longtime “well-connected” resident, a message on the “Justice 4 DJ Broadus” Facebook page reads.

“The fact that our son was an outsider in Baker County and the suspect is a longtime, well-connected, Baker County resident, gives us great concerns about the fairness of the process,” the message, which was posted on Feb. 13, explains. “As parents, our hopes are that a thorough, honest, and unbiased investigation will be conducted.”

At least one other person was at the home where Broadus died, but according to The Root, the Baker County Sheriff’s Office redacted the person's name from the police report, as well as further details about the crime scene. Broadus' cell phone was also never recovered.

Last week, Broadus' family held a town hall meeting regarding the case.

Founded in 1861, and named after a Confederate senator, Baker County is a community with a legacy of  racial disparity. A mural featuring KKK members still hangs inside the Baker County Courthouse, despite a 2015 petition to have it removed. Last May, Baker County made national headlines after a photo of black students at Baker County High School with nooses drawn around their necks, began circulating on social media.

And when it comes to gun violence and unarmed black victims, the Fraser family has it’s own history. In 2009, Fraser’s father, deputy Ryan T. Fraser, was fired for shooting an unarmed black man while responding to a robbery call. Although Ryan claimed he thought the alleged suspect had a gun, former Jacksonville sheriff John Rutherford, concluded that the officer’s actions were “unacceptable.”

Ryan became the third Jacksonville officer involved in a shooting that Rutherford fired when he took office in 2003. Meanwhile,  Ryan found another job working in law enforcement in Macclenny, and retired in 2017.

Amid talk of a conflict of interest, and to maintain transparency, the Baker County Sheriff’s department turned over the Broadus case to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. But authorities have yet to make an arrest, and the family says that they’re not being updated on the status of the investigation.

In the meantime, Broadus’ loved ones have launched a You Caring account aimed at raising $100,000 to pay for an independent autopsy and legal expenses.

Iwuoha believes that Broadus will become a “catalyst” for change in the legal system within Baker County.

“A lot of people in the community are tired of the nepotism.”

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Mississippi Mayor Willing To Pay Drug Dealers And Gang Members To Leave

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The amount of money is reportedly $10,000.

Espy was adamant about his desire to divorce the city of criminals. "But make no mistake about it, we are asking those three groups of people; if you are just simply a criminal, if you are a gang member or a drug dealer, move out of this city now.”

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“We encouraged [potential criminals] to stay in our city and become great citizens. We will also be putting an etiquette class in place for these people. And we have skill sets to prepare them for jobs coming to the city of Clarksdale.”

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Justice For Junior: Testifying Witness Says Hit Has Been Placed On His Life

Kevin Alvarez, one of several Trinitarios gang members responsible for the barbarous June 2018 murder of Lesandro "Junior" Guzman-Feliz, was indicted on murder charges.

However, after striking a deal with the prosecution, which involves flipping on his co-conspirators, Alvarez pled guilty to manslaughter and conspiracy and faces 25 years in prison. According to the 20-year-old, a death sentence has been placed on him for "doing something bad" like snitching to cops.

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He then explained that he was the one who pushed the bodega door open, helped to drag Junior out and repeatedly punched and kicked Junior in the head while he was down. Junior tried to tell him he wasn't the person they were looking for, but Alvarez and co. didn't listen.

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Florida Teacher Arrested For Carrying Knives And Loaded Guns In Classrooms

A fourth-grade teacher at Starkey Elementary School was arrested Monday (May 20) after authorities found knives, a 9mn Glock with seven rounds of ammunition and other weapons.

According to reports, the 49-year-old had the weapons, including a six-inch fighting knife and a two-inch finger knife, in classrooms with students.

Reportedly, Starkey Elementary School principal saw Betty Soto behaving suspiciously as she carried the backpack with her wherever she went.

Law enforcement arrived on campus after being notified by the principal. They interviewed Soto and found the weapons. The teacher reportedly was let out on bond at 9 PM Monday night and when asked by reporters why she brought the weapons to school she attributed it to Gov. Ron DeSantis.

"Ask Desantis," she answered. "Ask your governor."

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Soto reportedly will not be returning to Starkey Elementary School.

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