Stacey Dash Says Kanye Shouldn’t Apologize In A New Op-Ed

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While Barack Obama was running a second term, Stacey Dash was one of the more vocal African-Americans that showed support for Republican candidate Mitt Romney. As of late, Kanye West for support of President Donald Trump has landed him in the middle of controversy. This might be why she felt inclined to publish an op-ed on her website, saying West should be unapologetic about his free thought.

“Good for Kanye West for standing up to these people. They [Democrats]  don’t deserve a blank check, and the days of us writing them one during each election year are coming to a close. We are not victims or unworthy of our own opinions. We are individuals,” Dash wrote.

Yeezy made headlines when he posted pictures of a signed Make America Great Again hat and a selfie with Trump. Chance The Rapper (who later apologized for intervening) did what they could to stand by Kanye’s side, but Dash took it a step further.

In her op-ed, she speaks on the public condemnation for supporting Romney. She believes Obama, and the Democratic party as a whole, didn’t do much for black people, particularly those at the bottom of society’s financial totem pole.

“That’s the plantation mentality in a nutshell: no demands for real results, while settling on lofty words about the great compassion of a leader and assuming that he or she will do what’s right for the country, even if there is no evidence that’s actually happening,” Dash wrote. “Even having an opinion that differs with mainstream Democrats is an invitation for abuse.”

She charges the “political establishment and liberal Hollywood are not helping Americans succeed” by putting members of society into categories created by racial stereotypes and implied some black people have bought into it.

“Liberal Hollywood places people into categories according to racial stereotypes, requiring blacks to shuck and jive for them, perpetuating segregation and division. Identity politics are used to tell people which candidates to vote for,” she said. “This is modern-day segregation, by force, but the liberal elite in Hollywood can act as though they’re ‘supporting’ black Americans while keeping them on the plantation.”

Do you think Dash has a point? Read the full essay here and sound off in the comments.