Machine Gun Kelly Accuses Eminem Fans Of Editing Booed "Rap Devil" Performance

This is getting out of hand. 

Over the past few years, we've seen rap beefs go to digital heights. From memes to fans creating challenges in favor of their favorite contender, today's digital age has played a heavy hand in changing the essence of one on one lyrical combat.

The practice seems to have slithered its way into Eminem and Machine Gun Kelly's rap bout. During his interview with the Breakfast Club on Thursday (Sept. 20) MGK questioned some of the instances that have happened since the start of their feud.

Just a few days prior, footage of Kelly being booed as he performed "Rap Devil" surfaced on social media. Shortly after, it was revealed that video may have been dubbed to include boos as well as "fans" lying on social media about went down at the show. Kelly explained that instance along with doctored ghostwriter credits has been done by Eminem fans or someone close to the rap legend to sway the narrative of the feud in his favor.

"The narrative is becoming a little unfair right now, I came in the ring as one person," he explained. "I never asked Puff to retweet a thing or get my celeb friends to post under my page. And here is this audience throwing banana peels in my corner. You fake edited boos into a performance into me while I performed "Rap Devil.' Not only did I not get booed, but I also step out in the crowd, Michigan included, as the song plays."

"I give 10,000 people a people a chance to do what they want to do and say what they want to say," he added. "You can't edit that narrative to be what it's not. I've seen fake edited ghostwriting credits, what are we doing here? There's a real video and there's a fake video."

Kelly is currently on tour with punk rock veterans Fall Out Boy. The rapper also dived into the history of his issues with Eminem, which were reportedly resolved after Kelly had a talk with Em's manager and current president of Def Jam, Paul Rosenberg. While things seemed to be smoothed over, the "Bad Things" artist says he saw red flags that made him think otherwise.

"We had settled it behind the scenes but as I start to go about my career, you start to go about these roadblocks," he added. "You can't just minimize it to Shade45, you got to think about it. Eminem is Interscope, Machine Gun Kelly is Interscope. This man has brought about millions of dollars to that building. I'm new, I just came to that building. Not only did that happen, but me and Yelawolf were beeing. He's an Interscope artist signed to Shady. I have his loyalists and he has his loyalists but the problem comes when people assigned to work for me aren't' working and are picking sides."

See more of thoughts on G-Eazy, those praising his lyrical abilities and his respect for Halsey below.

On G-Eazy:

Not only can he not rap, but he can't do math either. I mentioned Finland in a post. [In Finland], we took a bunch of drugs together. He told me, 'Dude, you rap circles around me, I could never rap as good as you.' But when you go on this Netflix Rapture series and say you're the best rapper in your area, it's not a fact. You make club records. You don't impact the youth to me or my soul.

On Eminem:

What Eminem said wasn't true. Jimmy Iovine and Puff conference called me at 9 am in the morning. We don't speak to him. We speak to his spokespeople. I don't know why people ride for this man so hard. It's a little weird. I'm a man of the people, I'm a vulnerable person.

If Their Beef Was Calculated by Interscope:

That would be great, that would be a great help. You took two weeks [to make "Kill Shot," I took two days [to make "Rap Devil"]. That's another funny narrative that I hear. I've sold over 20 million records. As me, as Machine Gun Kelly. It's very hard for me to accept that this career buzzed out of nowhere via him.

On Halsey:

I did (when asked if they had sexual relations). That was when me and her were rocking. I don't know why she keeps getting thrown in it. I didn't even say no names (in reference to his Funkmaster Flex freestyle), I don't know what everyone is so sensitive about it.

On Him Being Slept On: 

I can't help that I'm on point. I can't help that it took this to happen for the world to see my talent.

I think that's why I said if this is what it takes to show my talent off, I'm with it. I was raised by wolves, I was meant for this. I got energy for this. My track records for beef isn't Christina Aguleria or Mariah Carey. My track records are all gorillas. I've gone to war with nothing by gangstas, gorillas and 450lb security guards.

I think ultimately I owed hip-hop this moment because of how I came in was hip-hop. I had frustrations int he past but to be fair, the narrative chooses to tell is what the media hears as opposed to what the fans hear. There's always been bars. Now I'm looking like, 'See?'

Check out the interview above.

READ MORE: Machine Gun Kelly Was Not Impressed With Eminem’s Diss Track “Kill Shot”

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Nike Donates $5 Million To Obama Presidential Center For Athletic Facility

Former President Barack Obama teamed up with Nike to help build a brand new athletic facility at the Obama Presidential Center. The Nike-funded community center maintains the “open feel” of the presidential center, which is housed at Chicago’s Jackson Park, and includes a museum, library, and a forum for public meetings.

“The very presence of an athletic facility underlines how much the power of sport is woven into President and Mrs. Obama’s identities,” Nike’s Chief Social and Community Impact Officer Jorge Casimiro shared via Nike.com. “President Obama, after all, is famous for his NCAA brackets and his love of the White Sox, and the Obama family inspired kids everywhere to get moving.”

The Obama’s personally donated more than $1 million to the facility which has so far raised around $400 million in private donor donations since 2017.

“It’s all part of a new kind of presidential center: a place to inspire, a place to learn and a place to reflect, but also — as befitting a president who brought his love of hoops from the South Side of Chicago to the South Lawn of the White House — a place to grab some friends and get active,” added Casimiro. “As President Obama declared when he unveiled his plans for the center, “It wouldn’t be the Obama Presidential Center without a place to play some ball.”

The Obama Presidential Center is scheduled to open in 2021.

 

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Review: 'Bad Boys For Life' Proves To Be A Promising Crowd-Pleasing Throwback

“We ride together, we die together” never really made that much sense as a slogan, did it? Regardless, the line that epitomized the appeal of Bad Boys, the uber-violent action buddy cop franchise that turned Martin Lawrence and Will Smith into movie stars back in the mid-90s. Smith and Lawrence– now fiftysomethings– are back for a third go-round with surprising and enjoyable new tricks.

In 2003, the eight years between Bad Boys seemed like an eternity. But there’s been seventeen years between Bad Boys II and Bad Boys For Life—the former hit theaters before an iPhone ever existed, just as the so-called War On Terror was hitting full swing and a wide-eyed Beyonce embarked on a nascent solo career. If the buddy cop genre was on life support in the early 2000s, the formula is almost completely post-mortem in 2020; most buddy cop flicks in more recent times have been subversive spoofs (like 2010s The Other Guys) or unfunny one-offs (like the forgettable CHiPs).

This time around, Mike Lowry (Smith) and Marcus Burnett (Lawrence) face the realities of middle age. Burnett is happy to waltz into retirement and into “Papa” territory, exhausted from chasing kingpins. Lowry, on the other hand, is ever more of an adrenaline junkie than in the past; addicted to the thrill and holding on to a “bulletproof” playboy image that’s getting sadder and sadder—particularly when he’s forced to admit he wrecked a promising relationship with fellow officer Rita (Paola Nunez) and every time he peppers his bravado with Millennial-speak like “Turn up” and “One Hunnid.”

Lowry’s disappointment in Burnett’s desire to leave the force turns into something harsher after a shooting forces Mike to take stock and Marcus distances himself from his old partner. Of course, this is all just a set up for the duo to reconnect in the face of tragedy—along with a gaggle of new recruits led by Rita; including a computer geek who may or may not be a killing machine, a young tough guy who hates Lowry for apparently no reason, and Vanessa Hudgens.

Bad Boys For Life has more heart than the lunkheaded Bad Boys II, directors Adil El Arbi and Bilall Ballah don’t forego the departed Michael Bay’s formula for punchlines and hyperkinetic violence; there’s an opening knife sequence that’s almost gratuitously graphic, and an action set-piece on a bridge that may be the most ambitious in the series. There’s only a passing mention of Burnett’s sister (played by Gabrielle Union in the previous film) and an obligatory callback to II’s funniest moment involving his daughter, but a lot of the movie’s emotional core sits with Smith’s Mike Lowry. Smith plays his first action star with an almost meta-level of intensity.

He’s the sum of all Will Smith’s Will Smithiness in one character and gets to play with the idea of Lowry’s machismo persona. Together with the recognition that Lawrence isn’t really an action star (the film smartly turns his affinity for sitting and watching as Smith jumps headfirst into heroics into a running gag), it’s a good turn for the characters and helps elevate the second half of the movie after a somewhat rote first half.

As the film’s “big bad,” Telenovela action star Kate del Castillo isn’t given a whole lot to do, nor is Jacob Scipio as Armas, as her son and steely hitman, who is on the hunt for Lowry. Reliably familiar support from Theresa Randle as Burnett’s long-suffering wife and Joe Pantoliano as the perpetually-flustered police captain Conrad Howard reminds everyone that this is a Bad Boys flick, and the actors clearly relish jumping back into their long-standing roles.

But these films always work best when Smith and Lawrence get to quip lines back-and-forth while dodging bullets, and the easy partnership between the two remains intact, even when the film lags under its own clichés or the sentiment borders on silly. There’s a twist that feels especially contrived and so many self-referential moments where Marcus and Mike seem to almost know that they’re in a movie about Marcus and Mike (who say “Bad boys for life” as a wedding toast, really?), but there’s a breeziness to the proceedings that feels more in line with the easy fun of the 1995 original—as opposed to the frenetically hyperactive feel of its sequel.

Anyone who is excited to see Bad Boys For Life wants to go into it for what these movies have always managed to give their fans; just enough comedy sprinkled with just enough to story to justify eye-popping action sequences and RoboCop-levels of bloodshed. The buddy cop genre was always predictable, but the best of it—classics like Lethal Weapon, Beverly Hills Cop and, yes, the first Bad Boys film—has always been a fun night at the movies.

In that regard, Bad Boys For Life doesn’t disappoint. It’s coasting on the easygoing partnership of Smith and Lawrence, as it always has. 25 years ago, they were two of the biggest stars on television, making a somewhat unlikely leap to action stardom in a movie initially written for then-Saturday Night Live comedians Dana Carvey and Jon Lovitz that was being directed by a guy most people had never heard of. We may be a vastly different audience today than we were in the 1990s or 2000s, but there’s some fun in watching how different Mike and Marcus are too.

Franchises like Rush Hour and Lethal Weapon seem like big blockbuster brands of yesteryear, as a whole generation of moviegoers have grown up with vast comic book spectacles or rapid-chase car flicks overpopulated with musclebound tough guys. As such, Bad Boys For Life stands as a sort of throwback in popcorn entertainment; that reliable action-comedy that coasts on the chemistry and charisma of its leads—more so than otherworldly special effects or universe-building.

The constant mentions of “One last time” statements remind the audience that this could be the final go-round for Mike and Marcus. Big box office returns can reroute retirements, but if this is indeed the grand finale for Bad Boys, there are worse ways to go out. In a world where Lethal Weapon 4 and Rush Hour 3 exist (with talk of another in the Chris Tucker/Jackie Chan series coming down the pike), Bad Boys For Life should be praised for what it does manage to do so well. It’s fun, violent escapism that doesn’t ask too much of anyone. And sometimes that’s really all we need these movies to be.

Bad Boys For Life opens in theaters Friday, January 17.

Director(s): Adil El Arbi, Bilall Fallah Starring: Will Smith, Martin Lawrence, Vanessa Hudgens, Jacob Scipio, Alexander Ludwig, Kate del Castillo, Joe Pantoliano, Charles Melton, Paola Núñez, Nicky Jam, DJ Khaled.

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Odell Beckham Jr. #13 of the Cleveland Browns warms up prior to the game against the Baltimore Ravens at FirstEnergy Stadium on December 22, 2019 in Cleveland, Ohio.
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College Football Officials Pondering Policy Changes After Incident With Odell Beckham Jr.

A domino effect might be on the horizon after Odell Beckham Jr.'s encounter with LSU players and a security officer that led to arrest warrants and debates about possible NCAA violations.

Speaking to USA Today Sports Thursday (Jan 16) executive director Bill Hancock said officials from the College Football Playoff will investigate practices that allow non-players to engage with players on the sidelines during events such as the national semifinals and championship games.

“Being on the sidelines is a privilege,” Hancock told the outlet. “Along with any privilege comes responsibility, because the focus should be on the people playing and coaching in the game, rather than on any visitors. The CFP will be reviewing its policy for allowing guests onto the sidelines and into locker rooms at future games.”

While the LSU Tigers beat Clemson Monday to secure a spot in the national championship, all eyes were on the Cleveland Browns wide receiver for handing out money to players and slapping the buttocks of a Superdome security guard. The incident took place in the LSU locker room. It was initially reported that the money was fake but it was confirmed that the money was actually real.

Video of the incident went viral and just a few days later, New Orleans Police Department public affairs officer Juan Barnes confirmed that the security guard filed the complaint. An arrest warrant for simple battery was issued against Beckham Jr. on Thursday.

The NFL star and former LSU player possibly committed an NCAA violation "if it’s determined athletes with eligibility remaining received cash," USA Today Sports mentions. OBJ and his representatives are cooperating with authorities, the Browns said in a statement.

Statement regarding Odell Beckham Jr. incident: pic.twitter.com/7cN3jOLCj6

— Cleveland Browns (@Browns) January 16, 2020

LSU will now investigate the incident to confirm if any NCAA violations were committed and if it will affect any of the players seen in the video.

Many have pointed exactly why the officer was in the locker room in the first place. As the players were celebrating their big win, the security guard allegedly threatened the players who were smoking cigars in the locker room. Stephen A. Smith reacted to the news and the NCAA possible violation as "bogus."

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